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Best practices and inspiration from fundraising experts

The DonorPerfect CommUNITY Conference explores how organizations like yours can move from transactional fundraising tactics to transformational fundraising strategies that focus on building relationships. All sessions are now available on-demand!

“WOW. WOW. WOW so much great stuff. Hardest part will be figuring out where to start tomorrow in implementing all the improvements we can make!”

Jennifer, Disability Resource Association

Spotlight Sessions

From Transaction to Transformational: 5 Steps to Human-Focused Fundraising

Speakers: Mallory Erickson

Description

You hear it all the time: “Fundraising shouldn’t be transactional.” But what does this actually mean, and how do we show up as transformational fundraisers instead? Transformational relationships help nonprofits raise more without all the cringe-y, sales-y, uncomfortable fundraising strategies. In this session, Mallory will break down the behaviors, habits, strategies, emotions, and language that make a relationship move from transactional to transformational. You will never fundraise the same way again.

Transcript

Lori Skibjak: Good morning and welcome to our first session. It's titled, From Transaction To Transformational: Five Steps To Human Focused Fundraising. Our speaker this morning is Mallory Erickson. Mallory helps nonprofits radically shift their donor engagement strategy. In fact, Forbes named her the number one female disruptor in the nonprofit sector. She is a certified Executive Coach, Fundraising Consultant, creator of the Power Partners Formula, and Host of the podcast, What the Fundraising, sponsored by Donor Perfect. Her technique helps reduce burnout among nonprofit employees and adds the human touch back into what should be a human-focused industry. Keep in mind before we get started that you have a handout that you can download and put into your briefcase. You need to put your questions into the Q&A section. We do have a general chat, which you can all greet each other, but please make sure your questions go into the Q&A. Mallory, the stage is yours. Mallory Bressler Erickson: Awesome. Thank you so much, Lori. Let's just start with busting a big myth. We hear this all the time, "Don't be transactional." Seriously, if you've been fundraising for more than a week, chances are someone has said this to you, "Don't be transactional." That's probably why you're like, "Yes, Mallory. That's why we're here." I don't think we actually understand what being transactional looks, sounds, and feels like. We think that being transactional means talking about money. Money is like this super bad word and we want to avoid the subject at all costs, especially when we're trying to build a relationship, but I don't agree. Talking about money is not what makes something transactional. Only caring about someone because of their money and their money alone is what makes a donor relationship transactional. When we go on these listening tours where we don't talk about money, but we're thinking about it the whole time and we aren't genuinely interested in what the donor is saying, but are just collecting data to input into our CRM system and then never use again, that's a transactional meeting, even if you didn't say anything about money at all. On the other hand, a meeting that does talk about investment and partnership, but is deeply committed to finding alignment and being ready to emit when it isn't there too, that's not a transactional meeting. Fundraising in a transformational way, a human centered way means that we're transparent, honest, respectful, and looking for mutually beneficial opportunities. It means we tap into empathy with all of our funders to see their pain points, interest goals. When those things align with the goals of our organizations, it's magic. When that's the genuine focus, the conversation around investment is an exciting one, because let's also be clear about something. Transactions are not inherently bad. A transaction is not the same thing as being transactional. Buying a house is a transaction, a transaction that people are so proud of and makes people feel great. Investing in a nonprofit can also feel really good, but only when the road to getting there is honest, open and partnership-oriented. If we haven't already met yet, it is so nice to meet you. My name is Mallory Erickson. I'm an Executive Coach and Fundraising Consultant. I'm the Creator of my signature course, the Power Partners Formula, and the Host of the new podcast, What The Fundraising. I'm so proud to have Donor Perfect as one of the podcast sponsors as well. Most importantly, I'm a fierce advocate for the nonprofit sector. I've spent the last 15 years working exclusively in it. While I love it and believe in its potential to transform the world, I also see the stigmas, taboos, and limiting beliefs that are holding this sector back, both structurally and insight each of us as leaders and fundraisers. I am here to kick off this amazing community conference today with how you can transform your fundraising right now. I am so grateful to Donor Perfect for having me today, and grateful for all of you and the work that you do to make this world a better place. Before we walk through all of this content together, I just want to say, I have been exactly where you are. Running a nonprofit, feeling like I needed to put on an appearance everywhere, that I had it all together. I often say that I was an accidental fundraiser, just getting promoted up through the ranks in nonprofit, found myself in a managing director role and then executive director role that came with multimillion dollar fundraising responsibilities. I hated fundraising and every day was a constant hustle. I was so burnt out and overwhelmed all the time. I got to a real breaking point where I actually did think about leaving the nonprofit sector, but instead I went through Executive Coach Certification, Behavior Change Training, How to Design Training, and even worked with folks at IBOM design thinking. Those experiences and frameworks, they are what turned into my course, the Power Partners Formula, and it is a fundamentally different way to show up as a fundraiser. It focuses on alignment, mutual benefit, showing up embodied and authentic and transformational fundraising is at its core. I'll be taking the principles we go over today from my course to walk you through these five steps. As Lori already mentioned, there's a workbook to help you follow along. I wanted to give you as much content as possible, which means that I wanted to give you an easy way to track and reflect later. You can go ahead and download that now and use it as we move through this content, or you can just sit back and listen. I am not going to be able to monitor the chat while we go, because I want to get through this content, or the Q&A, but I will make sure there's time for Q&A at the end of our session. When you hear the word transactional or transaction, I know I already did a little myth busting here, but what's the first thing that comes to mind typically. If you want, throw in the chat. While you're doing that, let me just define it for a second. A financial transaction is an agreement or communication carried out typically between a buyer and a seller to exchange an asset for payment or in this case, a donor and the recipient. It involves a change in the status of the finances of two or more business, organizational, or individual entities. Why am I even telling you this? Because making a donation is a transaction. It just is. Like I said before, the beliefs we hold about the actual transaction part being bad is straight up wrong. I just want to make sure that we're all on the same page, about the transaction of donating, not being a bad word or a bad thing. We need to address our limiting beliefs as a sector around that, but that's for another conversation. Today, we're talking about how to not be transactional and what that means. Being transactional, as I said before, is that you only see your donors for their money and your communications revolve around that, or even when they don't, we can all tell and feel that that's the energy or the purpose behind them. Energy is contagious. So many of the things I go over with you today are going to include the strategy for transformational fundraising and how to show up energetically aligned with the right behaviors and habits. Before we dive into my recommendation around transformational fundraising, I want to look at some of those transactional things. If you're looking at that list and you're feeling like, "Oh, oh," like you have this little pit in your stomach, I definitely do some of those things. Do not worry, I was 100% right where you are. I was doing so many transactional things in my fundraising because a lot of old school fundraising trainings teach us to do exactly that. They teach us how to communicate in one certain way with all of our donors, or to have us ask for donations way too much, or rely too much on certain donor data, but not looking at the holistic person. Or they have us rely on an established donor outreach process that's been set in place for some time. Might feel really good to set it and forget it, but that's not transformational fundraising. I'm going to walk you through five steps today to make sure your work with donors is transformational, not transactional. We're going to talk about in step one and two, how to tailor donor outreach to who your donors are and your alignment with them, and how to even understand that in a whole new way. We're going to talk about how to frequently communicate with donors about the right content pillars, including the donors impact, how to develop personal relationships with individual donors, and how to continuously optimize the donor journey to meet donors where they are in relation to your shared goals and the mission of your organization. I also want to mention, which you might already have a sense of is that my work always combines strategy, mindset, and behavior work, and habit design. As we move through these five sets, I'm going to be providing insight into my biggest recommendations, both from a strategy perspective, and I'll be calling out mindset traps or helpful habits along the way. We can't cover everything surrounding all five of these steps, but I want to give you the most valuable content I can in our 45 minutes together today to really inspire you to think differently about what transformational fundraising will look like for your donors inside your organization and in terms of you as a fundraiser. Let's dive into these steps. Take a quick sip of water. Step one of transformational fundraising is that you really need to actually understand your donors. This is the underlying foundation of transformational fundraising. It might seem obvious to you right now in the middle of this training, but let me tell you, the practices I'm about to talk you through about empathy, putting on donor lenses, getting curious, these are things I watch fundraisers and non-profit leaders forget when they get stressed and overwhelmed, which is, understandably, a lot of the time. I understand, as I mentioned before, the hustle of running an organization. I've been there too, but I want to talk to you about why it's so important for you to keep curiosity, empathy, and these donor lenses at the center of your fundraising work and in all of your fundraising meetings. First, let's talk about empathy. Empathy is our ability to see the world through other people's eyes, to see what they see, feel what they feel, and experience things as they do. We often confuse empathy with sympathy. We have this misconception in the non-profit sector that we are the most empathetic people there are, but actually, I don't always think that we're very good at empathy, especially with our funders. We don't know how to see the world or even our organization through their eyes. Empathy has to start with our desire and capacity to be empathetic. If you're sitting there in a super bad mood, really defeated because you just heard you didn't get a $100,000 grant you were 99% sure you were going to get, guess what? That's not going to be the easiest moment for you to feel empathetic towards the pain points of one of your major donors. That's okay. Feel your feelings, but having awareness around your feelings is a really critical step so that you can make the right decision about whether it's even the right time to have a certain meeting with the donor or send a certain e-mail. I'll say, even when things aren't as stressful as right after getting a no on a grant application, we still need to make the conscious choice to tap into empathy. You're running a mile a minute, handling way too many things, having way too many hats on all the time. It isn't easy to just shift into empathy when you're struggling. You need to consciously do it. Part of what will help you get there in addition to just having more awareness around it, even just me talking to you about it this way is going to start to allow you to tap into empathy more easily, but another core strategy here is releasing judgment and being more open-minded. We also need to step out of our constant hustle, scarcity mindset. There's no way we're going to be able to be empathetic if we're sitting in a meeting with a donor, but we're worried about something else at the same time. Honestly, it would be better to reschedule that meeting. I always require that my clients have a buffer time before funder meetings to get their energy in check and tap into empathy before they walk into that room or, these days, log in to Zoom. Really making sure that you're consciously activating empathy is the first step in being able to understand your donors better. Activating empathy then allows us to put on what I call donor lenses. What's the idea of a donor lens? Everyone sees the world through the beliefs, perspectives, thoughts of their own life. I'm wearing pink glasses, you're wearing green glasses, X foundation is wearing blue glasses. If I keep talking to you about the world, describing everything as pink, how on Earth are you going to connect with it? Think about it in a different way, look up at the screen. What if I was convinced that that was an elephant with glasses on, and I keep talking about the elephant? There's no way you're going to be able to connect with it. That's not what you see. Empathy allows us to put on the lenses of the people around us, to build deep understanding of the problems and realities of different types of donors and different groups of donors. Try to imagine what your organization looks like through their eyes. What are some of the needs and desires of these human beings? How does their relationship with your organization meet those needs? It's really important when you're putting on funder lenses, whether it's to help you design communications or events or meetings, that you're differentiating based on the type of funder and how their lens is different. One of the biggest mistakes I see is people communicating with corporate partners the same way as individual donors, the same way as foundations. These are fundamentally different people and different entities. They make decisions completely differently. We have to be able to put on those lenses if we're going to connect with them in a more real and authentic way. I also want to be clear about something. Being empathetic and meeting someone where they're at isn't about being donor-centric in a way that's harmful to your community. I'm a huge advocate and trainer around community-centric fundraising principles. You can have community-centric fundraising principles and still empathize with different groups of donors in your community, still talk to them uniquely, still meet them where you're at. If you're like, "Well, how do I get a sense of their lens? Okay, this sounds great and all, I want to put on their lens, but how do I know even what color glasses they're wearing?" you can get a sense from, really, looking at their websites, what are they saying in e-mails, what are some of the patterns in their language, what campaigns have they given to before? What are other actions or prompts they've taken over the years? Looking at that data, thinking critically about what that means, but the absolute best way to understand their lens is to meet with them one-on-one and go deeper. Which leads us to the third part of how to really understand your donors. The best way to understand the donor better is to get curious. I mentioned earlier about one of the things you need to do in order to really tap into empathy is to decrease judgment. The antidote to judgment is genuine curiosity. Ask genuine questions that allow you to build deeper understanding and alignment between your organization and the donor. I know sometimes I hear this from clients all the time, "We really want a script for a donor meeting," but getting a list of questions sometimes gets us into a trap of rote questions and answers instead of really getting to know the donor. Do you have a sense for who they are and what they care about? What problems in the world they're trying to solve? Do you know their story? So many of the suggested questions I see online around what to ask a donor are so generic, and they're asking the questions through the nonprofit's lens. For example, here's a question we hear all the time, "What connects you to our mission?" Really standard question. I used to ask this question all the time. Think about it. That really centers the organization. The donor's going to answer that question with a lot of tunnel vision. Think about the difference between that and if you asked them something like, "What problems in the world keep you up at night?" You're going to get a much deeper answer and understanding of who they are as a person. If you get stuck, if you're like, "No, no. Please, I want a list of questions," then I want to just encourage you, if you're getting stuck and feeling overwhelmed, to think about the power of why. Asking why digs deeper into emotion and motivation. These help you understand your donor's behavior and identify their needs. Different ways to ask why are, "Why did you do, say, or think that?" "Really? Why was that?" or, "Can you tell me more about that?" or even just, "Tell me more." The last thing I want to say about curiosity is, check your assumptions and make sure you're asking open-ended questions. We make a lot of assumptions about our donors and I'm not saying that pattern recognition isn't important, it is, and we'll talk about donor personas in how to use your CRM to segment in a minute, but when you're meeting with people one-on-one, you should be asking really open-ended questions like, "Tell me about the last time you blank." "What did you think about blank?" "Why do you feel X?" Now that we've walked through how to really understand our donors, let's talk about how to communicate with them in a transformational way all year long and even in between your one-on-one interactions. Before I talk about the type of content to use with your donors in transformational fundraising, I want to talk about the second step that I've put here, which is around segmentation. By segmentation, I mean the way that you group donors inside your CRM system to be able to communicate with them as a particular group. Those are your segments. Once you understand the pattern differences between your donor groups, you want to segment them by personas and alignment. One of the mistakes I see a lot of the time is that organizations spend time meeting with donors and learning about them, maybe even sending out surveys and collecting feedback and input. Then, they just communicate with everybody in one big group. They're not talking to the donors, they're ignoring all the things they heard. They haven't kept the empathy or kept the donor lens front and center. You need to segment your donors by personas and go really deep around their alignment with your organization so that you have the right lenses on when you communicate with them. I know we know this, but it's important to say, that when you communicate with all of your donors as if their interests or giving capacity and motivations are all the same, the messaging gets lost on many of them or all of them. We hear that saying communicating with everyone is communicating with no one. That's why we segment. Donor segments might be based on giving levels, giving frequency, event attendance, campaigns funded. Donor perfect actually has a great guide around donor personas. I think Lori's going to just drop that link in the chat so you guys can grab that too. I don't want to be repetitive around the resources you already have, but I did want to put this in here because I wanted to highlight why I have event attendance and campaigns funded highlighted on here in particular. Inside power partners, I talk a lot about alignment. I think this is one of the biggest missed opportunities and how we communicate with our donors. One of the keys to using donor lenses is to be able to communicate how the donor aligns with your organization and highlight that in future communications. It's not just about knowing that they donated to a certain campaign or came to a specific event, but understanding why they did those things. What does that behavior likely tell you about them? Instead of saying something like, "Thank you so much to giving to our last campaign about blank." Let me give you another example of what this would look like. Think about this for a second. Let's say you were able to create a segment of donors that for everyone who had donated to every campaign focused on reforestation in Ecuador over the last three years in a particular region that had undergone a big fire. If you had that segment inside your CRM, just imagine how specific you could get in your communication with that segment. How much more you could highlight the alignment between what that donor wants to see and what your organization is doing to create the world or community you are both working towards? "I want to thank you so much for being a part of this initiative over the last three years. I know you were devastated just like us when the fire hit the blank region, it meant the world to see our community rise." All of that talking very specifically about the journey that that donor has been on with your organization since that fire, reforesting that very specific region. I hope this gives you though an idea of how segmentation, even when we're talking about mass email and not just one on one meetings can be used to continue that commitment to empathy and donor lenses and actually curiosity which we'll talk about next as we talk about the types of content and communications you should be putting out there from a transformational perspective. Step three is just that. Moving from transactional to transformational is to create an impactful communications calendar. Again, I'm not going to talk about the specific calendar part, because this is a resource that donor perfect already has, but I do want to talk about the types of communication and content buckets that I suggest. Before we get into that, [chuckles] I need to get your attention around this one. You are not sending emails to just send emails. Every communication piece of content, this goes for social media too, needs a clear goal and purpose. This is super important. I remember when I was in ED with way too many hats on, holding way too many things, I just really wanted to check some boxes off, to be done with it. That's not how transformational fundraising happens. If you want to be transformational and not transactional, you have to be really intentional about the content and communications you put out there, not perfectionist, but intentional. Again, with that empathy and funder lens activated. When I think about content and I help my clients around content, I really think about three types of content, three buckets of content, building community and a sense of belonging, keeping your community problem aware and making people feel hopeful. Let's talk about each of these really quickly. Building community and belonging, one of the most core human desires is to belong. It's something I don't think we foster enough in our work, especially with our donors. Help your audience self-identify as your people. Seth Godin, the marketing guru is a great resource on this, he has this sentence that I just love. He talks about, "People like us do things like this." Who's the us? What are you asking them to do? Help your audience self-identify with your people and highlight alignment. When you're able to do that, which has made so much more easy by the segmentation we talked about, people continue to know that they're in the right place. Then the third piece of building community and belonging is that communication needs to be a two-way street, whether that's surveys or other opportunities for folks to take action, that is really core. Then number two, keep your community problem aware. I did a podcast series with Jamar Diggs recently, who's this amazing YouTube marketing guru, you should definitely check them out, but he really helped me recognize how critical it is for your community to be educated by you. Not in a paternalistic or self righteous way, but that being a part of your community and your network should mean that you're supporting their education around the issue or issues that you're positioned to address. Creating content pillars around that is really critical. Then the third thing I have folks focus on when it comes to their content is making people feel hopeful and impactful. People take action when they feel hopeful. If you look at habit design and behavior change work, in order for a prompt to work like that donate button in your email, people need to have a certain level of motivation at that exact moment. Often we're like, "They came to the event last night, why they do this thing today?" No, that's not how motivation works. It needs to happen in that exact moment. Hope, hope drives motivation up. Fear drives motivation down. One of the things I want you to think about here, you should definitely listen to the podcast with Dr. BJ Fogg around habit design and behavior change. He'll talk more about how to intertwine, appreciation and gratitude into your communications as well and how to give prompts that help people take action. One of the things I really want to highlight here is that writing this content, if you're going to write content to try to help people feel hopeful, make people feel hopeful, you need to be in that space when you're writing that content. You need to be tapped in to that energy and that alignment and that empathy, all these things, because it's not that easy to write an email that's going to make other people feel hopeful when you yourself are not feeling hopeful. I just wanted to put a little note in here, a little attention. [chuckles] I want you to bring some awareness and catch yourself when you're building out your content calendar. If you're avoiding talking about that M word. If you're avoiding talking about money, other than in your ask emails, you should be incorporating conversation around your investment or our community's investment in blank. Or, "It was so incredible to have the support of X to be able to do Y," that should be interwoven into all of these emails. The more we segment the money conversation to only be in these very specific ask emails, the more uncomfortable it's going to continue to feel. I know this is a lot. Let me take another quick sip of water and we'll go to step four. Okay, so we have talked about three of the keys to transformational fundraising in terms of your meal delivery truck service. You can write multiple emails on the same topic, maybe even work on part of a grant that's focused on that, because you have the same donor lens on and tapped into some of that same or related empathy. Think about how much more that's really going to optimize your brain power and energy. We do this inside power partners and it is seriously game changing. My second big suggestion for bucketing your time is that when you're scheduling your time out for the week around content engagement, et cetera, you need to give yourself double the amount of time you think you need. This might sound crazy, but this helps your brain actually relax into the task. It will honestly actually probably even take you half the time you originally thought if you do it this way. I don't know if you've ever experienced this before, but sometimes if we have 30 minutes On our calendar to do something, especially if it's something that we have fear or nervousness around, then we'll start to freak out and we'll make up a lot of excuses about why we don't actually have enough time and, "Oh, man. Then I went to the bathroom. I only have 26 minutes left and so I should probably actually respond to that other internal email that's more important." We have some fun ways of self-sabotaging ourselves. When we put those bigger time buckets on our calendar, we can sink in, get comfortable, get into the flow, and then we're actually able to pump out the work so much faster. Speaking of time for one more second, I'm not going to talk about this in detail, because again, I think there are so many other great resources throughout the conference and with donor perfect to help you with this, but I would be remiss to not say that streamlining the tasks that steal time away from donor engagement is critical. Anything that your CRM can do, it should be doing and you should be doing only the things that only humans can do. You really need to let technology bear the burden of so many of these different things. One of the things that breaks my heart is when I see an organization that's using maybe 10 to 20% of their CRMs capacity. I really understand the upfront investment that it takes to automate and set up all this stuff, but it is going to pay off in the boatloads. I just wanted to make sure to say that before we move on to step 5. All right, friends, step 5. Here we are, you understand your fenders. You've created personas and segmented around alignment. You've created all of this meaningful content. You're building these transformational relationships. You're time-blocking. You're feeling like you have all this cognitive clarity as a result. You're letting your CRM do so much of the background work. It's increasing your capacity. Are we cruising or what? Well, now I'm going to tell you that you can't just set it and forget it. You need to be reviewing and iterating in this process. Listen, your habits and behaviors as a fundraiser, as a nonprofit leader are really important. If you follow steps one to three, but don't streamline time block or review and iterate, you're going to lose your mind when something doesn't work the first time, and you're going to go from a 100 to 0 really fast. I can count the number of times I did this as an executive director before I really understood this. We have a huge fear of failure in this sector. There's so much perfectionism and I do a lot of work around this in other spaces, but I just want to call it out here. I get it. I call myself a recovering perfectionist too, but we need to adopt a growth mindset here and a culture of continuous improvement. Perfection does not exist. It's an illusion. The goal we want around this is momentum. That is the goal. First I want you to recognize that fear often holds us back from looking closely at data. I just want to call it out. We say it's because we don't have time, but really it's because we don't want to know. Maybe what's under that rug. Because it might make us feel like we're failing. With a mindset of continuous improvement though, there is no such thing, but it is up to you to model this for your team and your organization, sometimes model that for your board of directors. When I was an executive director, I ran something called Failure Fridays. I don't really believe in failure, but I really liked to be illiterate. I would have a staff meeting every week, seriously, and everyone would go around and share their biggest like of the week. We have this fun little buzzer we would push after someone would share. Then we would laugh and we brainstorm for two to five minutes about what we could learn from it. We got better every week as a result. The reason I'm talking so much, not just about strategy around transformational fundraising is because how you show up as a fundraiser is what actually makes the strategy work or not. I'm going to give you a little film analogy here. The strategy is like the script or the screenplay. Your mindset, habits, energy, that's what's sitting in the director's seat. You can have the best screenplay in all the land, but if you have a bad director, it's a bad movie. If you truly want to move from transactional to transformational fundraising, you have to be human-focused in everything from your content and email blast to how you talk to yourself and your team when something doesn't go well. We only had a short time together today, and there is so much on these topics. Before I get to questions in just a moment, I just want to invite you to watch my masterclass, where I go over the entire blueprint of power partners. It's not one of those webinars. It's like just a teaser with no actual value. You can literally take it and apply the whole process right away. If you do want to join me inside Power Partners, you're also invited to do that at the end as well. These topics are big around how to prospect differently, how to show up differently, how to feel aligned and embodied in ourselves as a fundraiser. What I want more than anything is for fundraisers to feel so proud of the work that they're doing, moving money into the sector, moving money to address these issues that we all want to see solved. That is the foundation of all of my work. I'm so grateful that you joined me in this conversation today. Let's make sure we have some time for some questions. Here's some other ways you can get in touch with me too. Instagram is the only social media platform I hang out on. Come say hi. DM me there. Questions, I am going to see, I think Lori is going to feed me some of the questions that came up during the presentation. I will wait to check out those. I think I'm just going to read them. How do you feel about one ask letter to all, but having three to five targeted groups or options? I think what I hear you asking is that can an outreach letter have a general template, but then be customized based on the lenses of your targeted groups and segments? That is absolutely okay. I think what you want to be clear about though, and especially if you're writing a one-on-one email, like from your email box to get a meeting with a foundation, or to get a meeting with a corporate, partner, or a new perspective, individual donor, you really need to customize that email, and you should make 75% of that email about that. Much of what I see folks doing is writing emails all about their organization, "Here are our impact metrics. Here's all this stuff." That's through the nonprofits lens. That's through the nonprofits lens. If you're writing an email that says, "Hey, blank. I just saw your recent campaign on X, Y, and Z. I was so inspired to watch you doubling down around how we can change blank. Over here at X nonprofit. We are fiercely committed to that too. I think there are ways we could work strategically together in order to do blank. Would you be open to a quick 15 to 30-minute meeting to discuss how we might partner?" The end. I know there were a lot of blanks, and blah, blah, blahs in there, but you get the point. It's about seeing them and really reflecting on their lens and how that lens intersects with alignment with your organization. Yes, create that template around your different program areas, but then customize, customize, customize. Lori: Mallory, can you hear me now? Mallory: I can. Lori: Great. We run into a little bit of a snag where the stream froze, so we had to redo it. That's why we have a question about going through step four again, of your list. It was around the end of step three and into step four that they had missed. They were all asking about Mallory: Do you want me to go back to that really quickly? Lori: If you could quickly, yes. Mallory: Of course, yes. Hold on one second. Into three and four, so I'm not sure if we got through all of this, but what I will say is how about this? I don't want to make you wait for your next session, so I will write a robust post on Instagram later today, where I really go into detail around all three of the types of content in more detail. I'll send it out to the donor perfect team as well so that they can share. Just high level, your content should be focused on these three pieces, building community and belonging, keeping your community problem aware, and then making people feel hopeful and impactful. The thing I really want to make sure you don't miss around number three is that, on here about hope, is that hope is what drives motivation up. Fear drives motivation down. You should know that in terms of your own behavior, but also in terms of the relationship between when you're prompting donors to take an action. A lot of people think, "Oh, we just had an event last night. Why didn't my donor do blank today?" Motivation is actually only about how somebody feels in that exact moment in time. Your content itself really needs to focus on being hopeful in order to increase motivation in that moment where you're giving folks a prompt to take action. Then, moving out of number three, when the last things I said here is that, I really want folks to have awareness around when they are avoiding any mention of money or investment. I watched this happen in content where it's you don't even know the organizations, the non-profit, and then all of a sudden, there's an email with an ask. You should be talking about the way money is moving through your organization, the gratitude you have for different investments, what it's making possible X, and Y, and Z in all of your different content in different ways. Catch yourself. If you're holding yourself back from talking about those things because of some discomfort around money and fear, that's a super important thing to recognize and to address. Then number four was around bucketing your time and streamlining. We talked a little bit about context switching. There's so many great resources, online context, switching short of it way too many brain tabs open, like way too many computer tabs open when we're switching back and forth really quickly. We're losing energy every single time we switch. If we want to make the most of our energy, I encourage people to bucket their fundraising time by a funder type, a segment and interest area, so that you're talking about one program, one interest area through the lens of one type of funder at a time. That's going to really optimize your energy in that moment. People might think, "Oh, but I'm optimizing my energy because I'm writing all these different donor outreach emails," but it's those outreach emails like that great question I had before. If those outreach emails are about a bunch of different programs or people who are aligned with a bunch of different things, you're going to have way more context switching than if you're writing a blog post and an email, but they're targeted and bucketed by the things I mentioned here. Then I also talked about, and Lori, tell me, I hope I'm covering what we missed. Is that good? Lori: We're running out of time. Mallory: Okay. Listen, I want to be so respectful of everyone's time. I'm so grateful you were here. If for some reason because the templates, you didn't get anything answered, find me on Instagram. Find me on LinkedIn, email me mallory@malloryerickson.com and we'll get your questions answered in any which way. Thank you so much for having me. Lori: Thank you, Mallory. Thank you for attending our kickoff session and for the helpful and informative presentation Mallory, we do appreciate your time today. We have a 15 minute break before our next session made sure to visit our booths, our rooms, and lounges, to gather more information and learn what tools can help your organization. The next session, How To Create Donor Personas To Better Engage Your Community, Lou Bruggman and Kelly Ramage is at 12:30 Eastern. I hope you'll continue to join us. Thank you.

Strategies for Engaging Racially + Culturally Diverse Donors

Speakers: Tycely Williams, Chantal Bonitto, & Cherian Koshy

Description

Is your fundraising strategy inclusive? In this can’t miss panel session, nonprofit leaders of color speak to cultural norms around cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship. Join this critical conversation to discover how different cultures have an expectation around donor engagement and what your organization can do to respond in a way that celebrates who they are and how they want to give.

Transcript

[silence] Robbe: The donor team is committed to facilitating and encouraging critical conversations that pave the way for progress in your donor community. This keynote session, presented by DonorPerfect and AFP Global, non-profit leaders of color Tycely Williams, Chantal Bonitto, and Cherian Koshy, will examine cultural norms around cultivation and solicitation, and stewardship. Join us to discover cultural differences in donor engagement and learn how your organization can celebrate your diverse donor base. It's my real pleasure to introduce my friend and colleague Tycely Williams. Over the past 20 years, Tycely has inspired individuals and institutions to invest more than a hundred million in charitable causes. She leads the AFP Global Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Access, the IDEA Committee. Teaches fundraising and leadership at Penn State University, and currently serves as the chief development officer for the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington DC-based think tank that actively fosters bipartisanship by combining the best ideas from both parties to promote health, security, and opportunities for all Americans. Chantal Bonitto is an organizational leader in the space of diversity, equity and inclusion, and a seasoned development expert in the non-profit sector. Her career has been dedicated to identifying and creating resources for institutions that benefit the most marginalized communities in our society. Chantal's for justice, equity, inclusion, and the power of women’s philanthropy has made her an insightful leader in the future of resource development. Cherian Koshy is an accomplished trainer and speaker with more than two decades of experience. As a coach and consultant, he's led organizations to scale their revenue growth and build stronger teams. He's led several successful multimillion-dollar capital campaigns and worked with a wide variety of non-profits, including arts, human services, faith-based, and education. His industry-specific thought leadership has been featured in keynote presentations, blogs, webinars, workshops, and podcasts. We now welcome Tycely to convene this outstanding panel. Tycely: Thank you so much, Robbe. Really appreciate your many years of service. We have all learned so much from you about the importance of inclusion, diversity, equity, and access. I am delighted to welcome all of you. We are excited to thank DonorPerfect for the opportunity to really just have a very engaging, authentic, and actionable conversation. As we look to the calendar, I must wish everyone a happy Global Diversity Awareness Month. People around the globe, cultures and many corners of the world are celebrating what is actually unique about being a part of the human race, and that is the uniqueness that each of us bring that contributes to diversity. I'm delighted to be with two very dear friends who have promised that they are going to also be authentic yet actionable. It seems as if we're are gathered here today to talk about something that a lot of us know a lot about and that's diversification. As relationship builders and as frontline fundraisers, we understand the fact that when you are crafting a strategy and executing on tactics, that we would never solely rely on one source of revenue stream. We're seasoned enough to know that with diversity comes an element of strength, but yet when we tie racial and cultural to the concept of diversity, that can lead some of us to places and spaces of discomfort. I think it's largely because our lived experiences gift comfort. I'm really excited to center not only your intellect but to also showcase how through your unique identities as people of color who have excelled as someone who is often representing an identity that is within the minority, or an identity that is not as prominent and prevalent. You've done that in ways where you have not discounted or diminished your individual cultural identities. We want to invite you to help all of us who identify as lifelong learners, which all of us who've signed up for this conference does a commonality there, we are all lifelong learners. We want to dig into a bit more on the strategy side. Chantal, I'd like to start with you. I think when you think about the complexity attached to how to engage racially and culturally diverse donors, it can seem rather overwhelming, but I know that you've had some success introducing simple, actionable tactics. I want to invite you to talk with us a little bit about how you've been a success within past organizations and how we may be able to accelerate our growth by learning from you. Chantal: Well, thank you so much, Tycely, for inviting me to this table. I just want to wish everyone here, it's 314, 15 counting, good health and emotional resilience in this time. Like many people in this pandemic, I had a baby, I chopped off my hair, and I put on and lost weight and put it back on again. I just want to acknowledge that we are in a collective crisis and I wish you all very well in this time as we gather in community to talk about this work. I just know that it will be with us for a generation, and it's really accelerated our thinking around inclusive philanthropy in a way that we're having this conversation. I wonder if we weren't in this global crisis, I wonder if sadly, George Floyd, his murder wasn't caught on video, I wonder if this collective consciousness around the importance of belonging and diversity and equity and inclusion and justice would be at the forefront of our minds, so I just want to start there. I also want to acknowledge the AFP New York City Mentorship Program through the Emerging Leader's group, I was introduced to you both by Elandria Jackson, who I met through the mentorship program. I'm supposed to be a mentor, but in many ways, we are peer mentors. I'm very grateful for her introduction of us. I know through our conversation, we talked about a framework that I developed that I call the ABC Framework and I want to go deeper into that first if you don't mind. I have my timer on. I'm just going to share [laughs] a little bit and then we'll get into that. I have a 15-year career in major gifts, in fundraising overall, and I started as a major gifts assistant at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for the society. It was a different subset than this huge fundraising machine. It was a small community and I didn't see myself reflected in the donors that were involved or in the staff that was working there. What's interesting as I moved into events, because I saw more people of color and events, I was leaving the office and this Black woman walked in and out, and I said, "Who are you? What are you doing here?" She said, "Oh, I'm the former director of development." Her name is V. Renée Cutting. She's currently the CDO at UNICEF. I saw her and I was like, "Oh my gosh. Here I am fresh out of school." I'm like, "It's possible. Here she is. She's at the top of her game in fundraising. I see her. I can do that, so I'm going to come back." I think it's important for this panel to also be an example of other young people. There's a pipeline of professionals as well. I think we need to know that we can excel in this sector. I'm excited to represent that too. I went to Oberlin College as an undergrad. I was lucky enough to cross paths with Rashida Bumbray and heard her speak even after we graduated. She shared something at a talk around creating a world beyond our own imagination. It really resonated with me. As someone that works in fundraising and philanthropy, what does the future of our sector look like, from a donor perspective, and from a professional perspective? One of my goals is to help create a space in fundraising and philanthropy beyond my own imagination. Yes, I am a lifelong learner, I'm learning every day around how I can contribute fully to this sector, and to the people coming up behind us. My parents are immigrants. They came from Jamaica and Panama respectively. My mother came here before the term Dreamer existed. She was a person that was undocumented. She did not speak English. She was 15, and she became pregnant with me. I can't even imagine what that was like. She's fiercely independent, even today. Really, what I appreciate about the experience of having teen parents and figuring life out and growing up along with them, was that they wanted me to have a leg up. Education was a top priority. There was wanting to be to take advantage of programs that could help me accelerate. I'm a beneficiary of the nonprofit sector in many ways. When she was pregnant with me, she went to a Planned Parenthood, they pointed her in the right direction to have a full and complete viable pregnancy. After-school programs, when I was a young person, I also went to Brooklyn Music School, singing classical music, and that really helped me a lot. I was a peer sex educator teaching peers in Brooklyn around how to protect themselves from HIV, where to get testing through theater. That was really wonderful. When I started working in philanthropy, it so happened, I came out of public relations as a young person thinking, "Oh, this is what I want to do," and quickly moved into the nonprofit sector because I felt like I was making a real difference. There were no people of color like me, until I saw Rene and really saw myself in this role. Part of what I want to talk about here quickly around this framework is just encouraging an inclusive culture, recognizing, respecting, and engaging a diverse donor pool and pipeline. When I was working with Women Moving Millions, I met Hali Lee, and that changed everything. Her and Urvashi Vaid created an apparitional donor report. I created a program in response to that. It was really an important, tangible piece of research that gathered voices of donors, of people that are high net worth, that move money, and that are also people of color. It gave me something to respond to based on that feedback. What I found in that experience of meeting Hali and working at Women Moving Millions, was I wanted to fully change how I work, manage, and inspire people in our sector. Part of that is shifting the power paradigm of fundraising and philanthropy by showing the world what has always existed and why we need diverse and inclusive fundraising. There's an article that's part of this talk in Philanthropy Women that talks about Sarah Mapps Douglass, Julia Child, Biddy Mason, and these were women in the 1800s, born in the 1800s who were activating their philanthropy in major ways. It's like they're just forgotten from history. I think part of it is reframing how we think about donors. Donors of color and inclusive philanthropy is not new to this country, I think. It's just been systematically stamped out, systematically forgotten, and it's to the detriment of how our organizations can be sustainable. Now there's a wake-up call right around engaging diverse donors and many people contact me to say, "How do I do this? How do I do this?" I'm so hesitant because a part of it is you have to-- There's a song that my mother used to play growing up by Rubén Blades that says, "You can see people's faces, but you cannot see their hearts." Part of doing this work is changing your heart in how you think about people, and how you are an inclusive leader. Part of the framework that I considered when I give these talks around making the case for equitable and inclusive philanthropy, when I talk about, people of color not being a monolith, when I talk about not being a one size fits all framework, I want to make sure that the ABCs are done. I think that's the first step. A is assessment and readiness. I think that can be done in many different modes nowadays. As you see now, a lot of companies, organizations are doing staff assessments, how people in your organization are feeling, if you are engaging in DEI programs from an HR perspective. That's really important before you think about it from a development standpoint because philanthropy is a whole different ballgame. B is buy-in from staff, leadership, and board. You cannot do this work without buy-in from the board. That has to be clear. They have to understand why it's important and that you are intentionally doing this work. C is community engagement. How you're talking to, not only your donors, but the people you serve, and how you're talking about the people you serve is really important and critical. I say you need to go through those A, B, and Cs before you get to D, which are donors. That's the framework that I begin with, to talk about that inclusive philanthropy and how to begin considering that within your organization and within your development program. Tycely: Chantal, thank you for that. You've presented a pathway that helps people to also sequence their actions. Before we shift, Chantal, I would love your thoughts. In the event someone works within a culture where the beliefs influences behavior that is counter to the principles of IDEA, inclusion, diversity, equity, and access, how does one reconcile personal values against institutional values that may be in conflict with individually held principles? We talk a lot about the ills of systemic bias and inequity. Is there a place for an individual within institutional change? Chantal: Yes, I think that's a great question. I think a lot of people in our sector are thinking about that. I would say one is finding community is really important to refill your cup. As a people manager, I want to make sure that my team can thrive in a time when the world is thinking about this. I also make sure that my colleagues of color, that we are talking to each other, uplifting each other, just community is really important. The second is we have to have grace too. It's hard to do that, but I think it's important that we understand how culture shifts. Culture does not shift overnight. I remember being in a workshop and she said, "Imagine this Post-it Note moving half an inch every hour, and how long it will take to get across the room." Sometimes that's how long it takes to shift culture. Now, while that's happening, there are ways that we can influence and engage these conversations. Part of it is making sure you have diverse and inclusive leadership, so that we feel like we have a seat at the table to say the hard things and we feel protected to say the hard things. Then also protecting our team members that may not be in that room, but that they feel heard and that you're lifting that up. There's a groundswell and there's a top-down taking place. I think many organizations are going through this. I would also say, don't expect your teammates of color to do this work for you, especially without compensation. When I'm asked to do that outside of consulting, I refer them to a consultant. I think it's important to recognize that this work deserves investments, and it deserves a full person to think about it if they're going to take it seriously. If internally, recommend a consultant, look who's out there. There are many great people. I've worked with Angelie Grant previously at an organization, but there are many people are doing this work, especially, ensure this conference. I hope that helps. Tycely: Yes, Chantal, it definitely helps. As we shift over to hear from my other friend who is joining us today, I want to send her some research. I think the thing that I appreciate about the fact that, not only are we relationship-builders, but we are relationship-builders who ground our strategy and our tactics in evidence. We take the time to equally value the qualitative, which Chantal, you did such an excellent job centering for us, and you also did an exceptional job introducing social norms that we may not have familiar arity with as a result of our lived experiences. Within that, we often couple with the qualitative, the quantitative. Chantal, you reference the New York Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals. DonorPerfect has been instrumental in helping us as a global community of charitable fundraisers, better assess-- I think that's the beginning of the ABCs, Chantal-- better assess where we are. We had over 2,000 fundraising professionals provide some feedback through an IDEAs-centered survey. It wasn't just individuals from AFP, we partnered with other fundraising organizations. AADO, Allies for Action, Grant Professionals Association, Women in Development in New York, Women of Color in Fundraising and Philanthropy. There are some important takeaways and learning more about the prevalent presence of bias. Over 1/3 of people in the study reported at least one instance of bias from co-workers within the year. Sources of discrimination, in addition to race and ethnicity, also included other identities feeling pushed out, resonating, Chantal, with the point that you're making. Not seeing individuals in leadership who look like them. 30% of fundraising professionals under the age of 35 reported experience bias because of their age. As lifelong learners, we know that there is opportunity with a growth mindset to see value in all beings, regardless of their age. It seems like in addition to racism and sexism, we also has some age-ism creeping in. We also have 25% of the study participants say that they'd been discriminated against because of their appearance, their size, their height, their hairstyle, their tattoos. They reported that this type of bias, the offense came from a co-worker. I want to invite you, Cherian, as we talk about how we engage productively with people who are different. How do we find value in the construct of diversity, and not step into with the place of judgment to qualify it as good or bad, but yet to see it as a difference? To see it as a characteristic that not only differentiates, but when properly positioned, can be a competitive advantage for our organizations. Chantal beautifully introduced all of the opportunities that exist as a result of the pain of the past. Cherian, how do we bridge the pain of the past and create a pathway to prosperity? Every fundraiser wants to know, what do we do to serve up a win-win-win? Cherian Koshy: Well, thanks, Tycely. I will be honest, because I feel like you've set this up in a way that I have the answer to this very, very complex question. All I can do is talk about my experience and perhaps point in the direction of some ideas for us to think about. Where I feel challenged in the sector is that I see a lot of organizations who come to me with that type of question, to Chantal's point of not having the heart for diversity, inclusion, equity, and access, but wanting to put on the robe and walk around with that dress on. We see that so much in terms of performative diversity. That's where I want to start and address the issue of, we really need to appreciate difference as a central part of who we are as people and how our organizations are formed. To your point about research, we have great research already in some places. Chantal mentioned Hali's work with donors of color. You mentioned some research from AFP, which is really useful and helpful. The IUPUI, the Indiana University at Lilly School of Philanthropy has done some really good research in terms of diversity on boards. Of the 300-some people that are on here, I would imagine that there is no one in this conversation that says that diversity is unimportant, that we don't want diversity, but where I think we struggle is in the gap between what our intentions are and what our actual organizations are doing. By way of introduction, my name is Cherian Koshy and I work at the Des Moines Performing Arts as a Director of Development. Our fundraising team, we have a ticket base of people who buy tickets primarily for Broadway shows, and then we have philanthropy in addition to that. It would be classified as a predominantly White institution because we are in Des Moines, Iowa, and most of the audiences are White, most of our donors are White, and most of our-- for a period of time until we got involved in shifting this, most of our board was White. This is an ongoing challenge that the organization is working through, but many more organizations are addressing. I want to start with this aspect of research. First of all, we do have good research. We have some studies that we can focus on that give us some answers to some questions or point us in the right direction, but I do want to surface the fact that a lot of the research that's out there comes from the wrong vantage point, where it hasn't been inclusive in the past. To a certain extent, it's asked the wrong questions of the wrong people, and therefore, is giving us false negatives or false positives. I'll give you an example from the arts world. One piece of this that we're struggling with is the perception that people of color don't have money. One of the challenges that consultants will raise in the arts world is certain types of analyses of your donor file. What ends up happening is, you survey White donors, or you'll analyze White donors, and you discover that those people of color that might have been in your pool are near the bottom of those results. The assumption is that this is a leading indicator that these people could be ranked or addressed in this way. A lot of entities, a lot of predominantly-White organizations, particularly in the theater art space, will offer discounted tickets or entry-level opportunities to people of color when that's not really the problem that we're facing in the art space or in nonprofits in general. It's a misdiagnosis of the problem. One of the things that we need to constantly focus on in the sector is who are we asking and how are we asking those questions? Is there bias in the audience of our research, and is there bias in the form of the questions that we're asking? Then I think there's ongoing elements in terms of board education, or fundraiser education, or in nonprofit work that's being done that continues to harbor some of the wrong systemic thinking that we need to address. That holds us back as an industry from moving some of these pieces forward, from co-creating the research and the fundraising education from moving us in the direction that we-- I think we all know, at least those of us in this lifelong aspect of learning, that we know is the direction that we need to go. Someone in the chat mentioned board diversity and how we need that. I want to resurface what Chantal mentioned in terms of at the staff level and at the board level where performative diversity or performative inclusion will create a checkbox and say, "Well, we've hired Chantal. She's now in charge of our fundraising, so we're good now." In reality, what we have done is isolate-- Not necessarily Chantal, but we've isolated that person away from their ability to make a difference because they don't have the ability to influence the systems of power in the boardroom or in staff meetings. It really requires a sustainability mindset in terms of implementation. How do we get a group of people on the board that self perpetuate that diversity to continue to grow? How do we have a group of donors in our organization that may have seats of power because of their wealth, but also have seats of power because those individuals have an important element of adding value to our organization, regardless of their level of giving? What I think we see, and some-- As Chantal mentioned the AFP mentorship program, my peer mentor Julie Garza, is working on a study of donors of color that are not high-worth individuals. That element that tends to get lost in the shuffle, because if you have a person of color that is high net worth, it's hard for a fundraiser to exclude them. They have a large check that they're ready to write to your institution, but where we struggle is with a lot of donors of color being systematically excluded from those spaces because of things that are just the normal way that predominantly White institutions approach certain questions. When do we have board meetings? When do we have opportunities for donors to connect with one another? We tend to reinforce or reinscribe these inequities without really thinking through the implications of them. It's important for us to unpack. Why do we believe that certain pieces are important? How can we move forward in partnership with a diverse donor base, a diverse staffing infrastructure, a diverse board structure that may include things like involving someone on a board that doesn't live in your locale? In the new world order, we could have diverse board members that don't live in that area but add value because they have experience and engagement in that space. Ultimately, we look at outcomes. This is where a lot of organizations check the box and say, "Oh, we've reached these outcomes." If we start back from this perspective and alter our advantage point, then those outcomes are co-created. The outcomes are a global look at the outcomes. What does it mean for staff? What does it mean for our donors? What does it mean for our board? What does it mean for our beneficiaries in totality? Now, in our lifelong learning mindset, what new questions are raised? How do we go back to the drawing board and say, "We're not done yet? We will never be done because issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and access are asymptotes, they are not absolutes. We will get closer and closer to the ideal, but we will never get there. The problem that I see with some organizations is this achievement mindset of, "Well, we got there and we're done. Let's move forward and count those wins." Ultimately, it requires accountability on the part of the organization to say, "We can't stop thinking about this, not for a day, not for a week. We have to keep our eyes focused on moving this project forward every single day. What are the things that we can unpack and unwind as that case may be?" Tycely: I'm interjecting a cultural/social norm. I think Chantal would identify this. In our culture, we have call and response. When something resonates with us, we speak to it. We elevate. We amplify. Chantal and I both are saying yes, yes, yes. As I make this bridge, I'm going to create space for her to extend your thinking. Cherian, as I was listening to what you've interjected into our thinking, I'm reminded there's some social science research on Tajfel and Turner that highlights how we as human beings make sense of the world. We divide the world into in-groups and out-groups. We do that based on a set of both conscious stereotypes, so we have an awareness that we're doing. Then, of course, there's implicit bias where we don't have the awareness. I am really curious around this construct of in-group versus out-group. When we're tasked as fundraisers to develop a strategy, we qualify. Right? We step into a permissible place of judgment to quantify and discern what we shall pursue as far as relationships are concerned and those that we discount and discredit. Because we're operating within an in-group that has certain social norms and values, the behavior, the preference, the tendencies of White dominant culture, even when you have demonstrated qualified evidence that substantiates your point that people of color actually have means, sometimes it's not a fit. You find yourself in places and spaces thinking through how do you create and form and forge affinity. My question to you is, I'm stepping into a place where I'm really trying, even as a Black woman, trying to racially and culturally diverse my donor base. I'm thinking through, "Do I construct affinity groups for investors so that they can connect within our community by shared identity? Is it okay to have a strategy or an affinity circle for Black women, will that give more donors comfort? Will that provide more credibility?" All of that is just-- Even as a Black woman, I'm hesitant because I don't want to appear as being exclusive. Right? I don't want White women to think, "Well, here we are. It's just a different form of exclusion," but I'm also sensitive to the fact that in order for us to build it may require necessary segmentation by identity." I would love to hear your thoughts on that. Chantal, what's your good thinking? Chantal: So many things between what both of you're saying, part of it is redefining what we value, which is really important and looking at data differently. I did a presentation with Apple recently that talks about the DEI-ta base, D-E-I base. That's a whole separate piece. The five Ts are really important. We've all heard the three Ts, which is time, talent, treasure. The other two Ts are ties and testimony. Networks are really important, especially in this day and age. Testimony, being authentic or authentic selves. I think once we can articulate those values and how they can benefit the organization, it goes back to what you were saying, Cherian, around outcomes. That's why buy-in is really important. With building community in segmentation, I have honed my skills in major gifts. That means that there's a threshold that has to be met, but what I found is that there are so many potential major donors sitting in the mid-level, even low-dollar, that are people of color that no one is paying attention to. I can tell you, I rode one donor all the way into starting this program, where she was sitting after a $500 gift. A board member knew her, asked her for a $5,000 gift. I sat down with her for 15 to 20 minutes, talked about her values, what she cared about getting to, where she is giving to. She decided to invest a six-figure donation after that conversation. I think that we have to realize that people are there, and they're not giving to you, and there's a reason why they're not giving to you. Part of it is, with building community and segmenting people, I think it's having critical conversations at the board level first, which is inclusive or should be inclusive, where people of all colors and spaces should be at the table, to have a conversation around what it means to be an inclusive and empathetic leader and how to talk about the work of the organization in a way that respects the people that are being served. Then creating programming and content that provides a space for donors of color to show up and be their authentic selves. I think that's part of the C, which is community engagement. Once you create those spaces, you will see who comes at the table. Once you're speaking their language, you will see them come to you and say, "I like what's happening here." It's slow, right? I think that there's this conversation between mid-level and major gifts, and as organizations are shifting how they're working, how they're thinking, how they're being intentional around thinking about creating inclusive spaces for people that there'll be a loss of revenue. This is the thing. You have a bus. People are on the bus. What's going to happen is, people are going to get off your bus that don't belong there, and new people are going to get on the bus that belongs there. I think we cannot be afraid of that shift. If someone has a problem with thinking about this work in an inclusive way of inviting diverse voices and networks and testimonies to the table, then they're not right for the organization either. I think that's part of a moment of truth that we're all going to have. I also think donors, white donors, are also going through a journey of educating themselves. That's happening through networks like 2164, like Women Moving Millions. They're providing curriculum programs a safe space for high net worth people to learn this work with grace and understanding and also build bridges. Like I said, there's a bottom-up and there's a top-down. My hope is that, with this collective consciousness, that people are activating authentically. Of course, we're going to see performative stuff. I think it's part of the growth process, I'm hoping. Let's see. Tycely: Yes. Chantal: I think part of my work is having faith as well in the process and being a part of that change even though-- I remember Ana Oliveira spoke at an event. She was like, "Black women are amazing fundraisers working in fundraising and philanthropy." She's like, "Because they find access to power without having it." I think that's how I see myself. I'm doing this in our sector to try to create change. I think that, if we're all saying the same things in the different rooms that we're in, we can see change. Part of that is shifting how we think about outcomes. Thank you for saying that. Tycely: Yes. I love the way you are providing tools for short term outcomes, and you're challenging us to think about the long-term impact. What I also hear you saying is, the growth mindset is critical to the ABCs and to any strategies that you pin. I've learned, through many attempts, to introduce strategies and tactics with the term 'testing.' It's amazing that, as we gain experience, people expect us, and Cherian and you so beautifully did this, they expect the expert to know all the answers. You're the expert, you know everything. Some of it is like, hey, I think that this could and should work. We're going to test and we're going to learn. The measure of success for frontline fundraisers has to extend beyond the dollars raised. We have to say, with the appropriate lived experience at the board table, we could put ourselves out of a business and not even have to raise money. With the appropriate access to the right human resources, paired with financial resources, we could amplify what dollars could do because dollars alone is not able to solve for, and especially when we're talking about human services. Cherian, you kind of centered that. There are different organizations represented. When we're talking about human services, and we're talking about solving for some of the most critical issues that a person has experienced and someone else has successfully navigated through that, there is worth in that lived experience, in that testimony, Chantal. Thank you for centering that. We've got about 14 minutes remaining. I want to make sure that we're also taking a look at what's in the chat and extending some thoughts. I'm going to peruse through some of the questions that are coming from our audience. If you've got a question, please drop it in the chat. I also, Cherian, want to introduce you, and I would love your thoughts on identity. As a black woman who grew up in the Deep South in Birmingham, Alabama, with a name like Tycely, I entered the world knowing that I was named after Cicely Tyson. The way in which we tested people's intellect in my home was whether or not as a young child, someone would say, "Well, that's a very unique name."I would say, "I'm named after Cicely Tyson." If they said, "Who," my mother would say they are uncultured and you just educate them on who Cicely Tyson is, and you just keep it moving. It's interesting how I began, Cherian, wanting to learn more through formal structures about identities. I learned that identities have different dimensions. That identity is who you are, it's the way you think about yourself, but it is also the way you are viewed by the world, which may be contrary, to who you are. It's the characteristics that define you. So often, people look at identity, and they think that it's visual markers. The characteristics that define any of us are not seen. They're felt. You have to be close, you have to connect in order to be able to discern human characteristics. Cherian, I would be interested in your thoughts around identity, moral identity. Are there principles tied to our character that is equally as important as our intellect? What are your thoughts on the morals and the principles of relationship building? Cherian: Absolutely. I think this ties into your previous question, so I'll try and address both. I think it's so important that we're not monolithic when it comes to how we think about identity. That being said, there is an immutable characteristic to my skin color. Every room that I walk into, I will have brown skin. There is no part of that, even if I don't speak or I don't interact with anyone, there is a visual element to that. That is not something I can change. Now, there are plenty of diversity-enhancing people that don't have the skin color component. There's some great work by a group called Art Equity that talks about how that's the first line. That's the first element that we have to address. It really is just because it is unavoidable. I will say that I was very pleased with my kid's elementary school when they looked at dimension of identity and included something that I knew was important but was probably not on the radar of a lot of people, and that is accent. For my parents, when my dad was alive, my mom is still alive and has been in the country for 30 some or 40 some years, more than 40 years old, she had very a lot of difficulties navigating the public education system because people could not understand her. She was just speaking in English, but people couldn't understand her. There are lots of components to identity that are important. This comes back to the question of in-group and out-group, because we like the people that are like us. We want to associate with people that are like us and we feel comfortable in those spaces and places. That's completely understandable. There's a level of uncomfortability that we need to encourage and transcend, but it's very important for us to recognize our inherent alignment with people that look like us, talk like us, walk like us, and how do we break free of some of those challenging molds, especially when it comes to fundraising where a lot of the practice around data and sorting includes all of those biases, and we're bringing that baggage into some of these conversations. There's a book called Accounting for Slavery by Dr. Caitlin Rosenthal, where she talks about the baggage that business has, because it's carried forward. A lot of people think the origin of business was the railroads, but in reality, the origin of modern business was the plantation. It was systematic, there was tons of data involved in plantation work by chattel slavery. All of those things affect how we think about our work. Like it's a production mindset. How many more people did your organization serve this year than it did last year? As you mentioned, in human service, those metrics are completely wrong. It is messy and complicated and time-consuming to work with a person that is experiencing homelessness or hunger or drug addiction. It's not about churn and burn. It's not about how many more people can we get through our agency. It's about how well we can serve them, so complimenting those pieces. When it comes to circling back then to this identity question, I think it's important to recognize that we all have an intersectionality within ourselves and that has multiple pieces to it. We can't cover that today, but there is certainly a moral component that aligns with how we view our identity and then how we express that identity outwardly and interact with one another. There's an internal moral code that's important to me and how I want to live my life, and what's important to me and what I value and then there's a relational morality that affects how I interact with other people and what is important in those relationships. Again, more than we can unpack here today, but I think it's important to keep that at top of mind, to say that I'm coming into conversation with a particular vantage point. There's no view from nowhere, but that view that I carry in may not be the view that someone else carries. How do we meet each other in our shared humanity so that we can address a problem that we both agree is really important and needs a solution or needs, I hate to use the word solution, because I think that's a colonialist mindset as well, that needs to be addressed or reconceived or something like that. Tycely: Yes. I wish you could see this general chat. It's just blowing up with so many people affirming what you've said. Chantal, we've got about 10 minutes remaining. I would love to turn the floor over to you for your thoughts. Give you about two minutes and then, Cherian if you can close this out with or two minutes, and then I'll just round up a little bow with a one minute wrap up. Chantal, I know we've digested a lot, but would love to hear how this is sitting with you. Chantal: This makes me think back to just providing a tool that folks may need the reality of why this is important to our sector. That's the four points that I use to make the case for inclusive and equitable philanthropy. One is untold stories. Recognizing that people of color have been generous throughout history, but their philanthropy has been hidden from our history books. Two is population trends and that came up for me as well. By 2045, the US will be majority non-white. A more interconnected and diverse world is our future, which impacts culture. It goes beyond money. I think it's how we'll be engaging with each other. Even myself, my husband is Hungarian. We have children out-- we moved out of the city. That's another thing. We did in this pandemic, we moved out of the city. We are going to see more of that. It's just an interconnected world. Three is the wealth gap is closing. I'm curious to see how this pandemic will impact communities of color and their ability to attain intergenerational wealth in this time. I've been looking at research after 9/11. It just shows that there's some correlation around how that will affect people of color, but the wealth gap is closing. There's a consciousness around that. The wealth and influence of individuals of color is significant and expanding. I think also donors of color are strategic with how they're giving. When I think about this work too, or living in a legacy or working at legacy organizations, that there are newer organizations that deserve that money. I think that legacy organizations have work to do. I see a lot of younger organizations that are doing things differently. I think about where they fit in thinking about this work too. I think there's a very important space for that, the wealth gap closing. Four is a seat at the table. Organizations tend to respond to the needs of their donor population. Increasing funding from communities of color means that the organization's programs will refocus with intention. I think that's a lot of what you are saying as well. Like what does impact look like from the vantage point of someone that has the lived experience of those that we are serving or someone that has the lived experience of any of those intersectional identities, how that can impact what the work can look like. I'd say like making the case for us as frontline colleagues and even researchers and supporters of this work is really important to shifting culture. I'll just end there and thank you both for this opportunity to share with you. Tycely: Thank you, Chantal, exceptional. Cherian. Cherian: Well, I was going to close with something pithy and meaningful, but I saw in the chat, there's a series of questions around the same concept, and I've dealt with this quite a bit. I'd love to take the last few minutes to address this issue of change in the organization when the organization is resistant to change. I think this is the largest issue that we face, whether you are-- it's anonymous, so I don't know, but whether you are a person of color at a predominantly white institution, that's resistant to these initiatives or whether you are just trying to do the Lord's work in your organization, either way. There are change management books that I would recommend. Kotter just came out with a new book on change that's really, really good. You can follow that pathway, but I think ultimately you need someone in a position of power, in an existing structure of power to lead and champion this effort. Identifying that person by really asking some open-ended questions, how do you think we're doing in these areas? Really instead of-- What I found to work more often than not is to not come out and challenge their approach because they'll tend to get defensive, but rather to open up the space to say, is there more that can be done in this area? Then to identify from that champion, is there a piece of this project that you could move forward? Is there something of what you've already said that you'd be willing to step forward and initiate to grow that piece of what we need to do in the organization? Of course, this is, as Chantal mentioned, moving the post-it note across the room in little bits and it will be a long work, but it is an important work that I want to thank you all for taking the time to engage in because this is not easy. It is not fast, but as you all know, it is important among all of the other things that you are doing in your day-to-day life, trying to raise money for an organization. Thank you for what you are doing. Thank you for being part of this conversation and thank you for working to make the world a better place. Tycely: Absolutely. With that, we will collectively provide an attitude of gratitude. Wishing all of our lifelong learners who are working very creatively to write, set, some of the social norms within our sector. We are here with you. We look forward to championing your success and we salute your courage, Robbe, over to you. Robbe: I'm not sure I really want to say anything, but I have to. [chuckle] First of all, I've been monitoring the chat and I'm sure many of you have, and the praise and the comments and self-enlightenment and the learning that you've inspired is just amazing. What a wonderful session, inspiring, and very practical great ideas we can all use. A big thank you to Tycely, Chantal, and Cherian for sharing their knowledge and their experience, their lived experience. Each of their insights is so valuable to educate us and ourselves about how we can become more aware of how to engage racially and culturally diverse donors and also to perhaps be that change agent within our organizations. Thank you especially to AAP for partnering with DonorPerfect to bring this very important session. As you are winding down and digesting everything you've heard, seen, and learned today, what's up for tomorrow? We'll continue with the theme of building communities and relationships and transforming the way we work in fundraising. We will be looking into the future with Meredith Sossman. Where do you want to be in 2020 and how can you get there? Key team members from the Oregon Food Bank will tell us exactly how they transform the work of the food bank and about the success they are having, and you really don't want to miss that. It's a very inspiring presentation about integrating community-centric fundraising into their work. They won't just give us ideas how to grow, but also inspire us to make it happen. Don't forget to visit the booths and the lounges, talk with sponsors, and connect with each other. I hope you've had a great day, that you will have a good evening, and we will see everyone tomorrow for Day 2, starting at 11:15 Eastern with opening remarks. Goodnight everyone. [01:02:42] [END OF AUDIO]

How to Create Donor Personas to Better Engage Your Community

Speakers: Lou Bruggman, Kelly Ramage

Description

There are limited hours in your day and a growing number of channels in which you can communicate and engage with your donor base. What if you could become a more effective and efficient communicator through the creation and implementation of donor personas based on information you already have? In this session, fundraising expert Lou Bruggman will walk you through the steps to building data-driven donor personas using predictive analytics that will make your interactions less transactional and more transformational.

Transcript

Kelly Ramage: All right. Well, hello, everybody. Welcome to our session, How to create Donor Personas to better engage your community. Before I do the formal introductions, just a couple of reminders about our session. There is a handout available, which you will be able to add to your briefcase. Again, scroll down to the bottom of the screen, and that's where you will find it. We love questions, so feel free to ask them using the Q&A panel on the sidebar on the right-hand side of your screen, but we will address as many of them in our built in Q&A session at the end. I am Kelly Ramage and we'll be serving as a session hosts and co-hosts with Lou. I am the lead training specialist for DonorPerfect. I love the opportunity to meet and work with so many amazing people and organizations. I have the absolute pleasure of introducing your primary speaker, Lou Bruggman. Lou joins us as the lead strategist at Contour Strategies, but as you will learn and see for yourself, she is a passionate relationship builder and has experience in nonprofit development. She has the ability to link passion and purpose through philanthropy, by building rapport with individuals, corporations, and foundations, with 12 years of nonprofit and fundraising experience for specialization, guides clients to fuel their vision and fund their mission. Lou, I turn it over to you. Lou Bruggman: Yes. Thank you so much, Kelly, and sorry, I gave you some tongue twisters there in my bio. I just want to say, hello to all of you, that are tuning in and watching. I would say it's good to see you, but I can't see you. I would say it's good to hear you, but I can't hear you, but it's really great to know that you're there. I would love for you guys to just pop in the chat, say, hi, maybe where you're from. I think that would actually help ease my nerves quite a bit, because I'm nervous about this today, because normally I know what it's like to sit on the other side of trainings. I sign up for, especially the free ones, all the webinars and training sessions that I can, because I'm constantly trying to learn how to become a more effective and efficient fundraiser. I know that the time that you're spending today doesn't come without sacrifice, because I know that you have so many urgent things on your plate. I appreciate the fact that you took time to prioritize something that may not be urgent, but that is so, so important. I take that to heart, because I understand what that's like, and I want you to know that I really want to try to give you just some practical takeaways that you can utilize in creating Donor Personas, which is something that can sometimes maybe feel a little bit impractical when you have a lot of things to do. To kick us off in our conversation today, I want to share something just a little bit more vulnerable with you that I don't necessarily like to tell a lot of people. That is that I recently had a never say never moment and I bought a minivan. I always told myself, never ever, ever, ever would I buy a minivan. It didn't matter how mom I got, how many soccer games that I chauffeured. I just absolutely was not going to do it, but the longer I set in those school pickup lines, the more tempting those sliding doors began to appear. Not only did I buy a minivan, I bought the minivan, and I really went all in. I was like, "If I'm going to do it, I'm really going to do it. I'm going to buy all of the features." Of course, it has those fancy sliding doors. It has streaming capabilities. I have three kids, Netflix, it's really great. I can't even begin to tell you how awesome the cup holders are. Again, bought this van with all of these features, and for about two weeks, I knew how to do approximately two things with this minivan. I knew how to unlock the doors and I knew how to start it and drive it around. The reason that I'm telling you that story is because it's very similar to my relationship with DonorPerfect. I inherited a DonorPerfect in 2013 when I was vice-president of philanthropy for a large boys and girls club. I knew how did you approximately two things on DonorPerfect for two years. I knew how to log into the system based on a little sticky note, hidden underneath my keyboard. I knew how to log in and search a donor's name to find their number, their address, if I was sending a thank you note, and that's really it, that was the extent of my experience. That's because I really didn't have a practical approach to how to utilize the software in a way that would make me much more efficient and effective in the way that I was communicating with donors. I'm proud to say in that eight-year span, I've come a long way. The things that I've done as an executive director, really learning how to utilize the system of maybe staffing, inadequacies or just I didn't have the people that I needed. I learned how to utilize the tools that I had and also just from working with clients. As we go through our time together today, I really want to emphasize that I'm, one, a minivan driving mom, I am someone who utilizes DonorPerfect every single day with the clients that we serve at Contour Strategies. I'm someone that has a lot on my plate, just like all of you. Again, I really want to give you some practical and applicable tools that you can take home today to, again, address Donor Personas. That's a little bit about me. All right. Let's talk about, and I actually tuned into Mallory's session and heard that she addressed donor personas as well, which I love that you got a little bit of the why there, but we're going to go deeper. Donor personas, it's really an excellent way to start thinking about the segmentation of your donor database. If that is something that has been intimidating to you in the past, or maybe you've just been segmenting based on transactional activity and data, this is just a really great way to start really personalizing that and finding a way that it's effective for your organization. Then if you have really been intimidated by the process or you're thinking, "How do I even have time to sit down and tackle this?" I'm going to provide a roadmap for you today that really shows you how you can do this and how you can apply it in a way that is going to increase your efficiency and also increase the engagement that that donor has with your organization. The next question is going to be, essentially, what's my angle here, right? Because I can't tell you in my work with conference strategies, how often we meet with a new client? One of the first things that they bring up is donor acquisition. I hope that I don't disappoint a lot of you today, but I'm not coming at this from an angle of donor acquisition, because the fact of the matter is that we have a huge problem in our industry with donor retention. I feel like until we really address donor retention, then we are never going to improve our acquisition or if we do it doesn't matter. There's a really great book out there that I encourage all of you to read. It's called Every Non-profits Buried Treasure, Retaining and Reclaiming Donors. It's by William Hout, and I'm sure that we can put that in the chat for all of you guys, but he really outlines this problem that we have that so many of us within our organizations created this revolving door where we secure donors through a special event or social media campaigns. They're stuck in this revolving door where they actually never even entered the lobby of our organizations to learn about who we are or how that they can truly feel that impact that Mallory talked about. Before you know it, they've gone out the door and they're onto the next one. With creating donor personas and really looking at it through a lens of retention and better engaging the donors that we already have, we're essentially creating a better front door where we're opening it and it's being more personalized. Then we're sending someone to the back door too to make sure no one slips out, and before they do, we're really checking in with them about how we can do a better job and better engage them. Again, to reiterate this point, last year there was a 4.1% drop from 2019 in the overall donor retention rates, it's 43.6%, which is always a little bit shocking to me. I want to tell you guys that the organizations that we're working with and we're implementing this matrix that we'll talk about today, they're seeing donor retention rates between 60% and 70%. We would love to have personalized connection and conversations with each one of the donors in our database, but oftentimes we're just understaffed and we can't do that, but by utilizing donor personas, we really are able to increase our efficiency and make communication feel much more personalized to those that we serve, therefore really increasing our donor retention rates. Before I just continue talking on and on, it's a subject I'm very passionate about, Kelly, I wanted to see if you just had anything that you wanted to add from DonorPerfect perspective about donor personas and why this subject is so important to you as well. Kelly: Well, Lou, I would love to talk about it. I think it's a fantastic topic. I'm very passionate about it. I'm very excited about the possibilities that DonorPerfect offers. Not only with the existing data that's already in there that goes really unnoticed and untapped, but also with some of the other types of personalized data that we're going to be able to talk about later. In terms of really being able to bring data to life, I love where technology and personalization intersect, so that you can have more informed and more genuine conversations with your donor. I'm super excited about the idea of donor personas and how I have seen it through several different lenses, so to speak, as to how it really works and really does contribute to increases in donor retention. Lou: Great. Thanks, Kelly. All right. Just briefly, let's talk about what is a donor persona? For those of you who maybe didn't get to hear Mallory talk about this, or this concept is just totally new to you, they are fictional archetypes but I want to emphasize that they're based on real data and research. As Kelly said, they already live within your database or in your organizational knowledge of interactions that you've had. We're not just coming up with dream scenarios and dream donors. We're really basing them off of the people that we know and the data that already exists within our CRM. They're representative of a group of our donors that have similar characteristics, qualities, and attributes, again, so we can start lumping people together in those segments of how they're connected to our organizations. I just want to say they're developed from buyer personas that were developed in the late '90s, and it's actually a really cool story. There's a guy by the name of Alan Cooper that was a consultant to a lot of software companies. He noticed that these companies were building all of this software and these products without really a particular consumer in mind, or if it was a consumer, it was more about the demographics behind that consumer. He thought, "Man, there's got to be a better way that we can design this software and work with these engineers so they can really keep real people in mind and make it much more practical." Kathy was actually the first buyer persona that was ever created. We take a lot from that world, of course, in creating our donor personas, but that's the thought behind it is that we really want to, instead of just talking about segments and how we want to maybe communicate with first-time givers, if we can give that first-time giver a name and attributes and characteristics, and we can really keep that person in mind as we're developing our communication plans and our engagement strategies, it just really gives it a different life and a different lens in which you're seeing all the work that you're doing through the lens of the donor, and you're just becoming much more donor-centric, which ultimately is going to make your communication much more effective. Essentially, that's what Alan Cooper found and that's how buyer personas really gain traction and steam in the time that he works with these companies. That's the history of donor personas, where they came from, and what they are. Let's take a look at, this is actually something that DonorPerfect test created. Again, they have a lot of great resources in the knowledge base, but here's an example of what a donor persona might look like. Again, they give these personas name, this is networker Nicole. They outline really what segment, age group. You can see all the things here. What's interesting is instead of develop donor personas and putting it on a shelf to collect dust, actually, no organizations who have printed life-size cutouts of their donor personas and kept it in a conference room, or they have card and they print them out and leave them on a table where decisions are being made, because you can see how it really would change age the way your conversations and interactions occur. If you say, "Okay, we're talking about a segment of donors, who've given $1000 for the last two years, let's talk about our strategy," and then you actually pull out networker Nicole, and you start talking about that strategy really with her in mind and the people that are in this segment. It really does make a difference when you give it a name, it becomes much more personalized instead of just talking about a segment alone. That is an example of what a donor persona can look like. I have provided a template for that, that you all can use and just plug and play once we go through this activity. Here is the big question, and one that I think I've struggled with a lot, if I'm being just super honest, is, are donor personas practical for nonprofit organizations? Because we all have a lot on our plate and we're really always balancing what's urgent versus what's important. I really do feel like donor personas are so, so important, but it's never going to be the thing that's on the top of your to-do list. You're always going to have to be very intentional about doing this process. You're going to have to be extremely proactive if you tackle donor personas, and you're going to have to give it some time. Let's just talk about, in what ways are they practical, in what ways are donor personas worth it? It brings really your strongest donors into focus, meaning, and I'm not saying like, who are your richest donors? Really, who are the donors that really exemplify what your mission is about and who really help fund the vision of your organization, whether it's through volunteerism, or maybe it's through recurring giving, or maybe they're social media ambassadors? It really helps you to see who are the strongest people within our organization that really help keep our wheels turning and who are assets and what was our engagement with them like, and how can we replicate that? It also really strengthens your messaging. I don't know about you guys but when I was executive director at a marketing team, I found that a lot of times that we weren't on the same page about who we were communicating with or how we were communicating that with them, or really what their motivations are. If you can complete donor personas as an organization or inter-departmentally, it's really going to make a difference in how you communicate and what message you communicate as well. It also really informs decision-making as well. If you know the people that live within your database, who they are, how they align, really what motivates them, it's really going to change the dynamic of how you have important conversations within your organization. Again, going back to networker Nicole, are we keeping this persona in mind as we're making decisions about our organization and how we want to communicate, and where we want to invest money as well? Those are all really important things. I can't tell you how many times I'm working with an organization and we're talking strategy, and they're unsure, they're guessing, they're throwing a lot of things at a dartboard and really seeing what will stick. If you have that knowledge about who your segments are, what motivates them, it's really going to help you to make better decisions and better investments. When is it not helpful for nonprofits to really look at donor personas? It is time-consuming, if it's not focused. You're going to hear me say this a lot today, focus on a small group, just start somewhere, because you can literally develop hundreds of donor personas and they're not going to do you any good if you don't have practical way to apply and to utilize them. They can be very transactional if they're based on data that is only demographic. If you are just segmenting or creating donor personas without-- If you're just saying who and what, and you're not really focusing on the why of that donor persona, it's something that's going to end up on a shelf with a lot of dust on it. I would just say, be sure to have a well-diversified donor persona. Then they can't replace donor identities. If you're trying to create personas to get out of the hard work of relationship building, it's not going to work. We continually have to build relationships with our donors, look for opportunities to connect on a one-on-one basis, especially with our major and planned gift programs. You're never going to replace individual donor identities. This is really about communication, donor retention, and increased engagement. Kelly, anything to add to is the question, are doing personas practical for nonprofits? Kelly: It's an interesting question Liv that I don't consider myself an expert as I consider you an expert in this field, but again when I think about the information that exists in DonorPerfect, being able to generate some simple reports based on some of those segments, just a couple of those qualities, it's very revealing just to see who's in there. I call it just a quick data check, but it can be time-consuming. One of the things that I love to promote is that we have a fantastic technical support team. If you're new because I'm seeing some of the messages come in to chat that there's a lot of new people to DonorPerfect. Don't let the daunting task of trying to figure out how to run some of these reports get in your way, reach out to us because we would love to partner with you to help you see who are your donors, what do you have in DonorPerfect? Don't be a stranger is what I want to emphasize at this point because I think it's a fantastic process, but I do acknowledge that it can take time, but we're here to help and we want to be like that partner with you. Lou: Great. Thanks, Kelly. Let's start with how it is practical and how this can really bring your strongest donors into focus. I would encourage all of you at your next staff meeting, when it's maybe you, your executive director, your team marketing department, finance department, ask the question, who are our strongest donors, and what do they look like? Describe that person to you. You're probably going to find there's a lot of different answers about who your strongest donors are. I would say this process can really help you identify those things that I mentioned earlier. Our strongest donors are door openers, they're ambassadors for our mission, they naturally talk about what we do, and they bring others to the table. When we focus on retention, again, acquisition will naturally occur, or they’re social media ambassadors, they volunteer to help bring people to our events or whatever it may be. Get away with from talking about your donors just in the form of dollar signs and really start thinking about who these people and how can I create donor personas based on each one of these attributes. Again, these are based on real data, real experiences that we have, and so as those people start to really come to light, what was your strategy with them, how are they engaged, why they are engaged? Retrace your history with those people that you've identified are your strongest donors and really say, what did we do right in this situation, and is that something that we could really replicate? Again, you're getting everybody, you're getting this interdepartmental connection or understanding about who your strongest donors are and how we can start to really communicate about this. Really I think that this creating good donor personas, it starts with asking some really good questions within your organization about how you see donors and what their strengths are as well. It's going to tell you a lot about your organization and how much you're on the same page or not. The process that we follow at Contour Strategies is we essentially look at those donors. Like I said, you look at the historical context, the strengths of your donors, who comes to mind, what attributes do they have, and then you really convert those actual real-life donors into personas. Maybe you get a little bit broad with that definition and then ultimately you find the people that match those characteristics and those qualities, and you turn them into priority groups or segments, which we're going to go through that whole process today, but I just really wanted to outline for you guys that its real-life donors, personas, and then priorities. This is how it makes sense where you will actually apply. Your donor persona work for something that's going to work for you and creating a communication plan. All right. When we start working with clients, this is how we recommend that they start thinking about those donors. Let's just talk about annual fund donors. This is going to be different for every single organization that’s [inaudible 00:25:25] here, but again, this is just a hierarchy that we create. When we're just thinking about annual fund donors, we typically have our major gift donors, our mid-level donors, monthly donors, potential donors, and lapsed donors. I want to talk about really quick just potential donors for-- Again, we're not talking about donor acquisition. For me, a potential donor is someone that lives in our database, that has high potential to move into that major donor or mid-level strategy, but maybe who is someone who's not actively engaged. I did want to clarify that just really quickly. Again, we all know the general segmentation or makeup of who makes up a successful annual fund campaign, and so I would encourage all of you to start thinking about a person in each one of those categories and what their strengths are, so you convert again, those donors into personas. For example, we have major donor Mike, mid-level Molly, monthly donor Donna, potential donor Peggy and lapsed donor Larry. Again, what makes a major donor a strong donor for us, what does that relationship, or what does that context look like? Let's take a major donor. Major donor Mike, for example. We can start asking ourselves questions. As Kelly shared earlier, there are some questions that we're going to be able to answer very simply from our CRM. We can say, okay, we know that this person gives $10,000 or more each year, that he gave us first annual gift at the gala in a form of a check, he's been giving for five years. Then there's other things that we'll just know more from our knowledge. I hope that you're logging all of your contacts in the contacts tab in DonorPerfect, but if you're not, this is where the meeting of the minds helps to fill out some of this information that we know that these donors are responsive to personalized communications. They're usually introduced by someone else influential in our organizations. They are open. We always say that people that are generous with their money are also generous with their time and their information as well. Generosity is something that just flows through them, and so in this instance, we know that this donor loves to talk about faith and family, and they're very generous with the information that they give us. We also know that there are some retired financial advisor, love to travel, and read as well. You can see, we can get a lot of information from our strongest donors in this category, and then overlay them into a persona that says, what would make sense for other donors in this category that they give guests over $10,000? Maybe they're at a time in their career that's not super demanding where they can be generous with their time and money as well, they have some longevity with the organization. Again, we can start to extrapolate from the real-life examples and build a donor persona and that we can then prioritize. It's easy to do with our major donors, because a lot of times we invest a lot of time in those relationships, and we know who those individuals are, what they like. We prioritize them naturally, I think. What about a persona for this potential donor Peggy, who lives within our database? It's harder to do because there are so many question marks that we have, or we may not know. There are some things, for example, that we can get from our database, that this person has given a $500 gift, that they gave that gift online, they've been giving for less than a year, and I love this one is rumored to have high capacity, because we hear that a lot. We heard, so and so can give a really big gift. How do you know that? What do you do with a donor, this potential high-capacity donor that you don't have a lot of information about? Do you just guess in grading for a persona? That would really help segment and prioritize this potential donor group. That's where I'm going to early introduce predictive analytics to you guys. It's an amazing tool and it's information that you already have in your database that can really give you so much more to create effective personas. I'm going to turn it over to Kelly to talk a little bit more about predictive analytics. Kelly: Thanks, Lou. Well, predictive analytics is a amazing intersection. It really is an intersection of how technology can really empower you to know information about people that are supporting you, but you don't really know much about. We're calling it DP insights. Technically, just so you're aware, DP insights is really combining multiple industry-leading data sources and identity resolution technology to provide descriptive and predictive analytics. This is accomplished basically by taking basic contact information of individuals and appending it up to 1200 data points from a variety of databases in the United States. The attributes are then used in machine learning models to generate the descriptive and predictive attributes. Okay, what does that mean? Well, what that really means, is you're going to be able to go into Peggy's record and take a look and say, "Okay, well, this is what we know," but then you can go a little bit deeper and discover that there's interest that she has that there is an age category, a generational category that she's part of. It's giving you insight to information that you may not have been able to learn because you simply don't have the time or the resource to do it. It's a way that we can partner with you, the technology side, where you can then have those deeper, more meaningful relationships with your donors. You might be thinking, "Well, how is this different than a Well Screening?" Well, there's probably a lot of ways that we could answer this, but one way that crosses my mind regularly when I'm talking to DonorPerfect customers about this is it's almost like it's a precursor to a Well Screening. It's giving you, as I said, a way to just know a little bit more about them so that when you go to the table, when you make the call, when you send them a letter, you send them an email, or even a text because you've discovered their preferred communication channel might be text, you're able to speak in a language that really resonates with them. It's giving you the information you need so that you can learn more about them, and hopefully discover that they really do have the potential to become a more invested partner in your organization. If we take this intersection of technology and drop it into DonorPerfect, it now gives us a whole new way of thinking about our persona of Peggy, and giving you different ways that you can interact with them. I am super excited about this possibility and this technology. Lou, let's continue and talk about how this might be useful in building more meaningful personas. Lou: Great. All right. Say, for example, we had a lot of questions about Peggy, who she was, what her interests are, we really need help filling in the gaps. Using predictive analytics, this is some of those questions that it can help us answer. You can see we took off that rumor that could give more or has high capacity and we actually see that she has a wealth rating of 86 on a scale of 100. Sure, yes, she has that capacity to give a larger gift, but also that she prefers phone or email, that she's in the real estate industry, what her interests are, and then how old she is, and if she's married. Again, this really helps you fill in some of the pieces to really think about someone that you've converted from maybe that category of they've given a gift, but they're not really engaged with your organization, really looking at, okay, what were some of the things with that person? What are their attributes that we've successfully moved them into that major donor category? What we would call that is how do we move someone from a priority four to a Priority 1 segment? Predictive analytics can really help you fill in the gap for a lot of those questions that you may have about some of your donors. We'll talk more about predictive analytics in just a few minutes and how it can help with that organizational decision-making piece. Let's talk about strengthening your messaging using donor personas. We talked about we have the donors, we've created the personas, and now what do we do with them, essentially? What I would do-- and I was reading some comments in the chat, and one of them was about how it can be tricky to develop personas when you have so many dynamic attributes and really saying like, "We could create a thousand of these," and it would be one for each one of our donors, because they're all unique and different. I would just encourage you to use personas, I think, just really in the decision making and the messaging process. It's not going to fit necessarily everybody and that's why we simplify from persona to then priority segments. What would make sense for people to fit into what segment, but then when we go back to talking about an actual communication plan or calendar, we're keeping the persona in the mind instead of the segment because things can get just lost when we're just talking about segments of people. I would just encourage you to think about the difference between those two things. We're talking about, we have the personas, we're moving into prioritization, and how we communicate to those groups of people. More often than not, I know this is really small but when I ask people like, "Let me see your donor communication plan." I generally see something in this format. It's donors, anyone in the database, and this is everything that we send to them. I love what Mallory said about if you're sending something to everyone, it's really being received by no one. I actually did a little test on my personal inbox. Over the last 24 hours, I did not check or unread anything in my personal inbox, and I received 79 emails. This is from someone that I unsubscribed to everything. I don't want regular emails. I think 79 is a big number and it was surprising to me. There's further research that says that as Americans, we're exposed to anywhere from 4,000 to 10,000 advertisements every single day, through social media, or emails, the things that we see on television, the things that we hear on the radio. We're just inundated with messaging constantly. If you're one of those organizations that is still sending one type of communication to everybody in your database, that's not going to be effective and there's essentially a better way to do it. I want to go back to this thought, again, we have our personas and now let's put them into priority segments. Some organizations do this in a pretty simplified way. They might say Priority 1 segment, these are our donors, this is the simplest way to do it, who have the highest capacity, and we have the closest relationship to. That's our major donor segment. Again, we're keeping Mike in mind when we're communicating. Our Priority 2 segment, maybe it's donors who are giving less than $10,000 but we have a good relationship with them. They're responsive to our communication. For our monthly donors, what does that look like? For our potential donors, we know they have high capacity, but we have a low relationship, and then lapsed donors as well. You start to think about how we can segment our entire database into these categories in which we want to communicate. We're keeping an actual person in mind when we're having that communication, or planning our communication channels. That's our conversion, how we make this make sense. This is the template that you have within your handouts that Kelly said you could scroll down and utilize. We do more of this matrix and we do it by month. I would encourage you [unintelligible 00:38:32] 11 by 17, I would encourage you to print this out. You can hang it on a bulletin board or you can blow it up and you can use sticky notes. I would first encourage you to assess what was your communication plan like in 2021? Use this model. Okay, our major gift donors, what are all the pieces that they received? Okay, what about our mid-level donors? What about our monthly donors? What about lapsed donors, what was our strategy? You'll really start to see the holes within your communication plan or you'll get to see, who am I leaving out? Who am I not communicating with? Then when you start developing your 2022 calendar, really think about Mike, think about Donna and think about Peggy and [unintelligible 00:39:19] how do I want to communicate with these donor personas throughout the year? I'm not saying that you have to have a touchpoint every single month, but each one of these lines should be able to stand alone as the communication plan. I hope that you're not just sending one piece. My encouragement would be to use an omnichannel approach with them but again, you can get that more defined based on channel preference as well that you've created through your donor personas. Then have a quarterly touchpoint at least with these donors. This all funnels back into retention. If people feel like you know them, you're seeing them, you know what their interests are, the way that they prefer to be communicated, and because you're going to have those priority levels that you've segmented within your database, you're going to ensure that everyone within your database is receiving some kind of personalized communication or something that really hits on the alignment that they have with your organization. It's going to make-- I know, and I get this because I've been in your seat. I know you have a lot to manage. It's going to feel like a lot of work to formalize something like this on the front-end, but I promise it's going to increase your efficiency throughout the year, especially if you will go through and you will either flag or what we often do in DonorPerfect is we'll add a field for priority and we reassess this every year. We prioritize donors one through seven. I've just listed out five priority levels today, and then when I'm doing a priority five communication for lapsed donors, I'm able to pull my priority five report, or mail merge like that within DonorPerfect. It's just going to increase your efficiency so you're not guessing every time, who do we want this communication to go to? What segment do I pull? Am I looking at all donors from the last three years? You've already done that work through creating priorities and actually listing it somewhere within your database. Kelly, I would love for you to swoop in and talk about how we can effectively list segmentations or prioritizations within DonorPerfect in a way that really makes it easy for us to pull information and execute these detailed communication plans. Kelly: One of the things that I want to just emphasize is you can build donor personas in a variety of ways. It's using many times, the segments that Lou was talking about, using what's referred to as a selection filter. Whether you use DP insights or not, you have valuable information that you can sit down and work with this model that Lou is mapping out to figure out who your different personas are. When it comes to a communication strategy, there are mechanisms right within DonorPerfect where you can say, "I want to take my segment, persona Peggy group and I'm going to do these four different communication strategies." You could use the contacts page because there's ways that you can populate that page in mass so that you know that these are the people that received this communication on this day and because of some integrations, whether let's say it's an email communication, you can then analyze, "Okay, well, if we sent this out to 400 people that fit in this persona Peggy category, and we got 200 responses, then that means that there's 200 that I need to figure out what didn't work." You can select using a filter for your different personas, you can map it out, track what they're doing, receiving, and actually responding to on the contacts page is what it's referred to, and then you can use all of that data to then refine the next communication. A lot of it is going to be driven by selection filters or segmenting as it's sometimes referred to and you can save those so that you can look back and see what's been done so that you can have those informed decisions of what needs to happen, or pivot and make changes as you continue to review the information. The contacts page, I know Lou mentioned it earlier, and several of you in the chat mentioned it, is a huge asset in DonorPerfect in this whole idea of building your donor personas and mapping out a communication plan. Lou: I would say contacts too, I know some of you mentioned like, "Wish that I could get Executive Director, someone to insert the contacts. I think if we can always emphasize, we constantly want to be evaluating the effectiveness and really auditing ourselves and our systems too. When everyone is receiving every type of communication, it's hard to tell what's effective and what works. You can really, at the end of the year, evaluate your communication plan and you can pull, through that selection filter that Kelly's talking about, your priority four donors that are based off the persona of Peggy. You can say, "What communication did they receive this year? How did that communication really help us move the needle? How many of those priority fours are now converted to priority one, major donor segments?" Really, if you're not tracking it, you have no ability to measure it. When you put this type of plan in place, I think that really emphasizing, this is something we're investing time in and we want to make sure it works. We want to make sure that we can be effective. Therefore, everyone as we've created these donor personas and this communication plan, we have to commit to using that contacts tab and then really having a plan for evaluating at the end of the year. I'm a proponent of the contacts tab. I'm trying to give you guys some tools that might be effective in getting everyone to utilize that, which I think is a great segue into informing decision-making within our organizations. Really using donor personas, it can help in two ways. Do you make donor decisions based on the reality of your database? Are you living in that dream world where you're thinking like "In an ideal situation, this is what we would do when our donors would adequately respond." A story that I have about this is an organization that I work with. They were just completely sold out that social media was the way to communicate to their donors. They had invested a lot of time and a lot of money and doing social media appeals and campaigns. Then they actually went through the predictive analytics process with DonorPerfect, and they received a report back, which we're about to show you what that report looks like. I am not kidding, 0% of the people in their database had a preferred channel preference for social media, zero. They thought, we were just guessing based on trends that we were seeing and recommendations for other organizations that we work with, that social media was the way to go and now that we're really looking at the analytics of our actual database, that was a huge mistake. They actually saw that the majority of their database actually had a channel preference for phone. They actually started doing a phone-a-thon fundraiser and raised almost half a million dollars, doing what is maybe an old school phone-a-thon, but it was successful because they were making decisions about their fundraising based on the actual makeup of their donor database. I would love for you guys to see what that report looks like when you complete these DP insights and use predictive analytics. Kelly, do you want to talk about that? Kelly: Sure. I think the one thing that I just want to emphasize is that what everybody is going to get is a summary report and the summary report is going to provide some insight on things like demographics and generational information. Again, it's information that you already have in DonorPerfect, but this process in the summary report is just going to organize it in a way that's going to make it a little bit more accessible in a faster way. As I've been working with customers already, I am excited to hear their feedback and how it's helped confirm decisions, or it's helped them make redirected decisions with confidence. Again, think of this as just another way that it can help you save time, but you can do it without this summary report as well. It just takes a little bit more knowledge about DonorPerfect. The summary report is great, though. There's a lot of great stories that we could share but so far, our time is going by so fast, so I'm going to stop talking and pass it back to you, Lou. Lou: Thanks. I think the next thing it's really talked about, okay, what is predictive analytics? How can it really inform your decision-making within individual donor records as well, and so I just did one, let me show you this screen, where you have this DonorPerfect insight information. If you go through this process, and then you're really looking to develop these personas based on real-life donors and real information that you have, you can have the predictive analytics where it shows you generation, give capacity, interest as well. It can really help you on an individual basis as well. I just wanted you to see those capabilities and what that looks like. I know I've thrown a lot of information at you. At the beginning I said I really want this to be practical. I'm really circling back to that, of where to begin in this process. As Kelly has said over and over again, start with information that you already have. Hopefully, the majority of that information lives within your DonorPerfect or CRM system, but maybe some of it lives within your head and it's a good opportunity to get together as a team and really discuss your strongest donors and what are the characteristics that you see and what has been their journey, really, with your organization that has made it successful. Just start with information that you already have. Don't automatically jump into predictive analytics. Pull some reports, see what data lives there and how you can utilize it moving through this process. The next thing is interview donors for each persona. If you go through those and you'll fund donors that I was talking about, start that process and say, "I have a person in mind for each one of these categories that really represents a major donor well or a monthly-giving donor well." Go interview them. When I was doing direct fundraising, I was always looking for excuses to interview my donors and make them feel like they had input within our organization, and looking at opportunities to get their advice. I think this is a great way to say, "Hey, we're really trying to refine our communication and engagement. I would love to be able to sit down and talk with you. What kind of social media do you consume? Or when you receive a communication, what are those buzzwords or things that really move you to take action?" It's just a really great opportunity to interview them and fill in some of those gaps, which helps you, I think, create your donor personas, but also, it helps you to build that relationship with that individual donor as well and really feel like they have a stake within the organization. Use predictive analytics. Kelly and I talked about that a lot. When you start having gaps and you don't know, and maybe you don't feel like you know your database or you don't have the information there to really understand who makes up the majority or what some of those interest things are, it's a great tool. DP Insights is a great tool that you can utilize. Prioritize donors. Don't just create the personas and just save them somewhere or leave them on your desk. Really say, "Who fits into this segment? How does this make sense? Let's move these donor personas into segments. Let's flag it within our database, let's make a communication plan." It just starts to have a practical application in a way that it really makes sense for you to communicate. Again, you're going to see increased giving and you're going to receive increased donor retention rates because you're using donor personas and really overlaying the other individuals within your database to make them feel seen and heard and adequately communicated with. The last thing is to keep it simple. I was actually talking with a client yesterday and we were talking about donor personas. She was like, "I feel like a lot of people try to make dating profiles through the donor persona process." I'm like, "Yes, that's so true." You can have these long narratives and it can be so detailed. Keep it simple. I think the whole point of this activity is to keep real people in mind when you're developing a plan of how you want to communicate and further engage. Rely on those donor personas. They don't have to be overly complex. You can start with one. If you do anything between now and the end of the year, create a donor persona for a priority for or that potential major donor prospect and just map that out, what that might look like. Even if you just do one, that's still going to make you more effective with that segment prioritization of donors. I think that that's the rest of our presentation, but we would love to, in the time that we have left, answer a few questions, Kelly, if you see some good ones that have come through. Kelly: The one that jumped off the page for me speaking about donor personas that Judy asked is, can a donor have more than one persona? Lou: That is a really great question. When you move from the donor persona into the segmentation, I would try to keep people in one segment. You can overlay and you can say our priority one donors are going to receive multiple-- They're going to receive the same segment as, say, a priority three donor. You're just mapping that out for each one. I would, just so it's not too complex. Sure, they can have characteristics that match multiple personas, but when you actually move into the segmentation or prioritization, I would try to keep them in one channel until you get really good at that and then you can overlay them. Kelly: Great. Another question, this is more DonorPerfect-related, but I think we can both answer it, and it would be interesting to see is, how do you suggest including the donor persona information within DonorPerfect? Outside of DP Insights, how, Lou, in your experience as a consultant and strategist, how do you see this type of information being stored in DonorPerfect? Is it using the canned fields that every DonorPerfect system has or do you see that they're keeping it outside of DonorPerfect, or are they creating custom fields? What do you see? Lou: I do see in my experience-- We try to get as much in DonorPerfect as we can, just to create that organizational integrity. If one person leaves and they have the list stored somewhere, then we're starting over again with this process. We always recommended getting as much into DonorPerfect as you possibly can. What we found really successful is that we've actually created a custom field within the bio tab that outlines our priority system. That may look different for you, but we use a priority one through seven with our clients. You can do global updates to do maybe all of your lapsed donors, things like that. We'll go through and we'll add priorities to all of our donors based on certain selection filters like Kelly shared. I know some organizations use flags. I'm not a huge fan of flags. I would rather have it as a field because it makes reports much easier. You could also create a filter based on your criteria as well that you're just pulling over and over again for certain communications. You have your priority one filter, your priority two that's funneling donors into that path. I think that can get a little bit more complex. I really like having the custom field in order to track those donors. Kelly: I would actually agree with that. There's a DonorPerfect customer that I have worked with quite a bit over the last couple of years. They've actually decided to place a lot of those custom fields which everybody can create on their name page because they really wanted it to be front and foremost in their thinking and everything that they do. They have different teams. They have a major gift officer and then they have the annual fund team and so forth. They have different fields that they've created that are specific to what they need, but they're using the data that's already there and some of the standard behaviors in DonorPerfect, calculated fields and filters to help them create these attributes that are then helping them build their personas. I think we're saying the same thing, we just place it on different pages. Lou: [crosstalk] get it within your system. Definitely get it within your system. I think that's going to really help. Kelly: Absolutely. That will make it better for the long haul, absolutely. Because as I tell people, I don't want to get anybody to get hit by a bus, but when you win the lottery and you leave, you're leaving the legacy behind. Go ahead, Lou. Lou: I was just going to say too, if you're fully using the DonorPerfect integration and you're sending communications out, say, through constant contact or maybe you're using the BCC feature to log contacts, emails, things like that, then you can pull those reports and essentially look at the effectiveness of those communications from the contact tab as well, but if you don't have those segments within DonorPerfect, you're just adding multiple steps to your process, which is exactly opposite of what I want you to do. I want you to increase your efficiency. If you take the time upfront to plug it into DonorPerfect, it's really going to help you in that process, in the evaluation of all the work that you've done. Kelly: Absolutely. Again, this is one of those things that we would love to help you with. We have an amazing support team. We have an equally awesome training team. There's consultants out there that are there to help. I think we have time for one question, we have about a minute left, but a question that came up several times in chat and as a natural question is, can you have a persona for corporate donors? Something other than individuals. Lou: Yes. I didn't list that, but that is something that we're finding with organizations. There's this huge push in the realm of everybody wants to better engage their corporate donors. I would encourage you to create a donor persona and to add to that matrix of your communication. How are you going to communicate with your corporate donors sponsors? If that's something that you don't want to tackle right away, it's also okay to add your corporate sponsors into a priority one segment because you know that they have a major gift potential. Maybe it's your mid level because they come to your event every year. Definitely put them in some kind of channel, whether that's a standalone corporate communication channel line, maybe that's a priority eight, or if you're absorbing them into other categories, I think that that really is important to address corporate. Kelly: Great. Well, thanks, Lou. Thank you everybody. There were a lot of great questions. I know that there were several of my colleagues answering some of the comments in the chat. I would encourage you to hop over to some of the lounges and rooms. I look forward to working and interacting with you as our day continues. Thanks so much. Lou: Thank you. [silence] [01:00:39] [END OF AUDIO]

Donor Acquisition Strategies to Adopt in 2022

Speakers: Meredith Sossman

Description

In this session we will examine the interaction between relational fundraising techniques, donor cultivation and stewardship and the foundational skills and tools needed for small to mid-size nonprofits to reach increased fundraising results. The past may be filled with the stress of “too little time” to accomplish goals, but this session will strip away those barriers by providing real life advice gained from repeated work with nonprofits that changes mindset, habits and leads to successful transformational development work.

Transcript

Lori: Good morning and welcome to the first session of the day. My name is Lori [unintelligible 00:00:11], I will be the host for donor acquisition strategies to adopt in 2022. Your speaker today is Meredith Sossman. Meredith is an accomplished development professional who has helped nonprofits achieve better results in all aspects of giving and nonprofit management. In her 15 years of nonprofit work, she has worked with a variety of nonprofits to increase teamwork for better fundraising results, and effective relationship-building techniques. She has served as a campaign director, associate executive director, in-house counsel and chief development officer. For today's session, you will find a handout at the bottom of your screen. You'll need to scroll down, same process as yesterday, you can download the slides that she provided for you. Please make sure that if you're going to ask some questions, they go into the Q&A. Feel free to throw comments and whatnot into the chat. That's certainly fine but questions and answers are in the Q&A. They will be answered at the end of the session. Meredith, the floor is yours. Meredith: Good morning. Thank you Lori, and thank you everyone for coming this morning, I am really honored and excited to be here and to help you think about how to transform your fundraising this morning. What we're going to talk about is data insights and relational fundraising, as it relates to acquisition of new donors and sometimes acquisition of bigger gifts. I find that nonprofits tend to talk about finding new donors, as though the only place to look is outside of the nonprofit. They neglect sometimes to look in their database at people that maybe they haven't paid attention to or thought about yet. I want you to reframe, this morning, how you think about new donors and think about three things. Where do I find the new ones outside and how can this help me do it? Where do I find new donors that might already be volunteers or someone who was connected to me, whether loosely or otherwise? What does it look like to take those that I have now, prospects, volunteers, donors, and turn them into larger, impactful lifelong donors, because that's a form of acquisition as well. To take a $250 a year donor and turn them into a $10,000, $25,000 plan-giving donor is acquisition. When we expand our definition of using our data to create deeper relationships all around us in a holistic manner, then we change how we do business and acquire new donors in a fundamental way that we don't always think about the way that you might want to. The conversation really takes us into the world of the pandemic, which we are all, I know, so exhausted from. The bottom line is that, the pandemic taught us that relationships are crucial. Nonprofits by and large, were not ready for where they stood. It highlighted how transactional we can be. At the same time, we have this sometimes disturbing to some nonprofits, discussion, about the rise of big data and have to ask ourselves, how can something that cold warm us into better relationships? Why are we transactional, especially at small to mid-size? You know the answers. Every day, you struggle with the stress of limited staff, time, multiple tasks, and serving your mission. Fundraising is not always comfortable. I find that humans default to a give and get model. I once had a major gift officer who worked for me that was wildly talented. She was a warm and wonderful human. She represented the mission beautifully but it only took nine months for her to jump to a sales position. When she came to resign, she said it's nothing that we do here that made me go but instead, the idea that when I bring in a new donor, they give money and get nothing in return. That mindset is the give and get model right? If you give me money, I give you widgets back. We default to that and worrying that our mission isn't enough compared to others. With relational fundraising, how do we take a moment and realize that we're being transactional? This is the big thing when you talk about acquisition of new donors because we often start out in the transactional world when we do that. We send a mailing hoping that they'll return. I had an interesting discussion yesterday as I thought about this talk, and I quoted to a colleague of mine, "Hope is not a strategy." That's a favorite quote that another colleague uses. This colleague of mine said, "I hate that someone says that hope is part of the strategy." Both of them are right. Hope is part of the strategy, but if that's what we're doing, sending out our side of the transaction and merely hoping for a response, then we are not doing relational fundraising, because we're not recognizing and making an overture to the needs of that potential new donor. I want you to take out a piece of pen and paper. This is the interactive part, because we've all done zoom without enough interaction for a year. I want you to at least write down 5 to 10 donor names, preferably some of your best ones, and then one personal fact about them and count them up. If you don't do it right now, that's okay but this is an assignment if you will, to really think about a personal fact that has nothing to do with your mission. Then I want you to assess how well you know these people. As you do this, I want you to look forward at acquisition. If you write down these donors, and you can put a deep personal fact that you know, and realize that your relational fundraising is perhaps a little farther along, then you know that in acquisition, it's the same kind of personal touch you'll need to bring a new donor into the fold. How do we do that? What do our mailings look like? What do our emails look like? What do our personal interactions and phone calls look like if we want to do that? The first thing we do often is give ourselves excuses. That's a strong word. None of us wants to hear you're making an excuse because we don't feel like we are. But relation-- and they take time, the data is messy or not set up as we hope. Because we're in DonorPerfect today, we're going to do some talking about how to fix that data, and take big data options and turn them into relational acquisition and increased gifts. My board always an issue. We can't raise money because. I want to stop on this one. I hear this more than I hope to. I work with over 95 nonprofits in my consultancy, and it's shocking how often I meet wonderful, committed passionate executive directors, marketing people, development people, but they say to me, you know Mere, one of the reasons we can't raise money is that we don't, and they insert another mission. "We don't feed people, we don't, we only do this," and they insert their mission there. When we do that and de-prioritize it, every one of those people when I challenged them, has also said no, I believe my mission is important. It's just that that one's better. I have to wonder how subconsciously that belief translates into what we do and everyone swears they don't but I guarantee you that you do. Your authentic belief that your mission is one of the best and worthy of deep investment is incredibly important in every interaction you have with prospects. I also want you to do this, ready pen and paper time again. When you talk about a prospect when you write a letter or a postcard, an email for acquisition, how quickly do you jump to your mission and use the 'I', the first person. "I did this, we did this." I would like you, in the next two weeks-- I'll give you lots of time because we're all limited, to take out at least one of your acquisition pieces over the past two years. It doesn't matter to me which one. Then I want you to take-- a red pen is better. It feels hard to do but a red pen's better but pick a colored ink black or blue if you don't like red and circle every time in that acquisition piece, you used I or we are pointed at the nonprofit. Take the other ink color and circle every time you pointed at the donor with your language and then count them up. Just do a tally. If you're like most people, including myself years ago when I worked in nonprofit, in-house not out, you'll find that you quickly tally up a lot of I's we's our mission and speak about the nonprofit and not about who the donor is, what they can do, how they help, how others like them have made an impact and a difference on all of your constituencies regardless of what it is. When you start the you and the us and the inclusive language, you take that acquisition target; wow, big cold words like big data, and turn them into a partner in what you do. This is incredibly important in your acquisition work. Let's talk about relationships. When I spoke to some people last week, donors are like dating and that is part of acquisition too. We don't just meet someone that we’re already in love with and move on with our lives when we talk about dating or friendships. Instead, we run into this random stranger. I find friendship fascinating. All of us go through the world running into people. We run into and speak to someone in the grocery store, be it the clerk or another person, someone we run into in produce. I flew yesterday, so I ran into a gentleman as we stood waiting to get off a plane that was just sitting at the tarmac too long. We started talking, because we were stuck in a tiny little cabin right next to each other. We'd both been flying for hours and hours. I run into this other human and we start talking. Our brains immediately start making judgments about them, "I like them, I don't like them. This is a human I want to know more about, this is a human I maybe don't." Donor acquisition is the same. You are taking you and your mission and going out into the world and bumping into people, be it by a letter or a postcard, an email, in-person, and you are presenting your mission as yourself. You are saying, "We are here and doing this and I seek others of like mind and like interest." It's dating with a mission. We take that and turn it into more as we get to know these humans. As I bumped into this gentleman in the plane last night, we started out, just asking, “Where did you fly from?” We ended up walking through the airport together, and eventually, he turned to me and said, "I'm Dan." There came a moment when we realized that there was an interesting thing. "Who are you, what do you do? Here's my name. How do I learn more about who you are and what you do? We exchanged websites. As he left my presence, he turned back and said, "Hey Meredith, when you do this--" he was talking about an endeavor I'm involved in that is interesting and newer in my life. He said, "Be careful because there are sharks out there in the world." He expressed a moment of protection. When you run into donors or people, you have this opportunity to make them feel something with your mission, and what you do, and the impact they could have. I remember Dan's name and I'm not good at names because he made me feel, for a moment, that he cared about what I was doing. Not only that he had asked, but that he had some investment that I be careful in this endeavor. That resonated with me. That's what you're looking for. That moment of resignation. Is that even a word? I'm not sure it is. You know what, it is today. We're going to copyright it. As you ask questions, you're building that impact moment. Was it Maya Angelou who said, "People will not remember what you did but rather how you made them feel." Your letters, emails, acquisition, and relational fundraising is about how your nonprofit makes people feel right from the very first time you touched their lives. If you take nothing else out today, then take that with you and carry it as you go into your acquisition strategies. We have a little more time, so we're going to do some other things. As you ask them questions and elicit responses, reflect on those interactions and then bring them back and put them into your database. That's the least sexy thing I can say this morning. Take your interactions that are deeply personal in some way with your mission and type them into the database. I'm going to tell you, when I became a gift officer first, I was a bit of a cowboy that way. I generally have an outstanding memory. I love meeting other people despite being a deep introvert. I know many of you are rolling your eyes. Just my level of energy, even this morning seems to belie that I’m an introvert, but I am. Then putting it into a database felt so not relational, but it is because the database is the repository for you, and here's why. As fundraisers, as nonprofit mission-oriented people, we are deeply outnumbered. At my first job, there were 423,000 individual profiles in our database and one of me. Even in the first weeks and months, I went to this event every week that we had for our best donors. It was a limited group of about 1000 attendees on a weekly basis and yet, I was deeply outnumbered. Here I am, this takes pride in her memory and remembering people cowboy, not wanting to do something as cold as put everything I remembered in the database. Yet I realized quickly that if I didn't, there would be no relationships because I wouldn't be able to keep them straight in an authentic way. Your database, your DonorPerfect is your key to a better career. I'll make it self-interested first because we're all human. Bigger gifts, and a stronger institution. I see stronger institution and I don't like the example of hit by a bus anymore, though we all use it. I once worked with someone who was integral to the company that I was a part of and we used to say, “I hope Patrice never gets hit by a bus,” and then she was. Take a deep breath, she was fine, but it put her out for six weeks and the institution for sure took a hit. During that time, it was difficult. I prefer that we think about the database as the, "If I won the Powerball tomorrow, this information and these relationships would still reside here in some important way for someone else to pick up and not miss much of a beat with that donor." You have in that database constituencies, report notes, and follow up but you also have the opportunity to use Google Alerts. Here's why I bring Google Alerts into the conversation. I can't know, even if you only have 200 donors, everything that's going on in their lives every moment. I recognize and see you in your busy-ness trying to maintain everything you do to do good for others. A Google Alert on your donors or new prospect acquisition people can be a way to know them more deeply. Let's take acquisition. You run into Steven. I'm pulling names out of the air this morning. You run into Stephen at something and think, "Wow, there seems to be some affinity there with me and maybe the mission. There is ability. They seem to have ability to make a gift." I can't make people richer than they are. I wouldn't be here this morning if I could, as honored as I am to be. I'd be on the private island somewhere if I could make myself richer than I am. I love what I do, but the private island is looking pretty attractive because in the place I'm sitting in my hotel office here, it's pretty gray. Blue skies, and a beach, sounding good. That Google Alert, when I run into Steven and put it on him, gives me the opportunity not just to add him to our acquisition targets but to find out that he's changed jobs and I can remember and see him as a human by sending a congratulatory email, which builds the relationship with a big data trigger. Is Steven more or less likely to be acquired as a donor when I give that personal touch. We all know the answer is more likely because they are seen by you representing the nonprofit. DonorPerfect insights is a new tool that's coming out and I can't help but be excited too. When I reviewed all this at DonorPerfect to give you this moment. DonorPerfect insights is a new tool that will take your database and compile some of these issues to give you everything that you might want in terms of the ability to make more personal touches to add to your larger acquisition strategies. DonorPerfect can drive this relational fundraising ready to marry big data with acquisition and larger gifts. Grab a pen or pencil because this part you're going to have all of my PowerPoint and notes. I'm going to geek out a little bit, but it'll go somewhere great for you. I'm going to give you the testimonial all upfront. I've been working with a group that is a DonorPerfect client. Not through DonorPerfect, I met them separately and they are deeply invested in getting this right, their words. We've spent a couple of months doing that. Their acquisition has gone up by 823 donors since July. That's a lot of huge owners that we've been able to find by doing what I'm about to give you very quickly. We're going to look at constituent profiles, constituent types, the gift stages involved in acquisition through stewardship, predictive gifting, and then running a full picture report, to give you a snapshot in time, from your database on where you stand with each donor and your donors or prospects as a whole. Coding your data begins transformative fundraising. You need to know what each of the people, and I use that term lightly, in the database are. Because some of them are corporations and foundations. Those corporations and foundations act as gift givers to you but they have people behind them. You want to make sure that you have all of these constituencies but also that individuals who are at corporations are connected to the corporation foundation or what have you that you have. I won't live too long on that because hopefully you know it. I hope you also know these gift stages but more importantly, understand that they belong attached to each of those constituents in your database. We talked about identification. That moment, when you run into the human in the world and say, "Hey, that one, I like them and they might like us, as a person and as a mission." Qualification, I've spent some time on them and they have both ability to give us gifts and perhaps the ability for me to drive affinity. Meaning I can deepen the relationship with them and have them like us more. Be more deeply invested emotionally in what we're doing. Cultivation is the dating part. We've run into a human, we identify them, they're attractive to us in some way. We qualify them, "Will you go out with me?" "Yes, I will go out with you. I will have lunch with you. I will be your friend, your date, what have you." Cultivation is the time we spend in knowing each other after that and donors are no different. Solicitation is the conversation. "I'm your friend, I want to be friends with you. I like you and want to see you more." Stewardship is how we treat the relationship thereafter. Each of these stages should and can be attached to the individual profiles in your database. If Bob Smith is in the database and one of these gift stages isn't attached to him, then you are losing the opportunity to track moving him or he and his spouse or partner, through relational fundraising. That means that your acquisition of Bob is already hampered because you have not identified and purposefully thought about where he is. Let me get some water, sorry. I'm in LA today and in Pennsylvania, my voice is great. In LA, it's just not. Forgive me. Predictive gifts, what could Bob do if he was so inspired today? We're going to stick with Bob. We walk on door through this. Is he $100 to $249 donor and you can change these numbers. I did this to give you a pattern. I gave you this pattern of donors fit into these groupings. You can make it. You can start it at 1,000 to 4,999 and go up to a million plus but I want you to have some matrix for your predictive giving on each of the donors. You're going to turn that into an overall report for analytics. Now to be fair to DonorPerfect, this is an Excel sheet that I did. It is not a beautiful DonorPerfect report and DonorPerfect has beautiful reports. It will do it if you set up the database correctly. I did this for illustrative purposes only. You have your prospect names. There's Bob. He's in solicitation phase and you have tagged him and said, "I believe that if I solicit Bob, his ultimate gift right now is $1,000. As you put this together, you can start to see where everyone is. These donors, you have one in qualification and that person would do $150 gift, you believe. You have five in cultivation and if they did their ultimate guess would result in over $8,000. I'm looking at the bottom, giving these people numbers and stages. Solicitation, you have three resulting and maybe $27,000 worth of gifts. That's your evaluation. When you do this overall report for analytics, you not only see where your acquisition, cultivation solicitation targets are but also where to spend your limited time for the most return on investment. Now, if your database is set up this way, you're able to take those excuses we started with about time to acquire and cut down your effort in a very deep way. Now every time you go into the database and run this report, you know where to spend that first half hour a day that we're going to talk about soon on donor acquisition, on who should it be and your who's can be in mailings too. This doesn't just apply to individual attention acquisition. It also applies to who is opening our emails versus who is not. Who sent back a letter or gift in response to our letter overture and who did not. You can make this report for analytics tell you all the things you want to know in different ways about who is sitting in your data. When you meet Bob out in the world for that first time, when you look at the community that engages with you in any way that you think about acquisition, I think first about Facebook likes. Turning likes into action is acquisition. They've made the first overture that they like something you did. To leave it sitting there as a tiny thumbs up on a screen is wasted time and energy. They have made an overture that I like you and you have done nothing back. The relationship ends there. You run into someone at the coffee shop and they say, "Here's my card, I'd love to speak to you," and you leave it on the table as an overture. That's a Facebook like or an Instagram heart. I'm not of a generation that did social media. I was dragged onto it years ago by my then 11 year old niece but I see the problem with it. I also see the value and the ability for people to make an overture and give you the information that they are there for your response. Here is that prioritization. The data makes it clear suddenly, how to prioritize your time? Who's out there? If you did nothing with Facebook likes to take those people and translate them over into your database, you would know who had already made an overture to you and how to go find them to make an overture back to acquire someone who's already said, "I think I may like you." Better yet, they've told you how they like you. Is it your page and all you've done? Or, was it a specific program that they came across that you were doing something with? They've already given you then not only do I like you, I like this that you do. You can make the overture back to them, when you're thinking about fundraising you liked to this and we have an opportunity for you to engage more deeply with it, would you? That cultivation right the page before? There's Charlie sitting there in cultivation and he's got $7,500. The cultivations are only $8,800 total but Charlie jumps out as someone to call to move [unintelligible 00:28:37] in a very quick way from this report. Those relationships lead to bigger more impactful gifts even as you acquire. Think about all we started to string together here. How do we look at who we're acquiring and what they've already said to us in a deeper way? How do we look in our database at those who dip their toe in the water with a $20 gift, but told you over and over again, "I give you $20 for this every single year?" That is acquisition. Don't forget that that $20 donor that comes back year over year over year, either may not have more now but be a planned gift later, or may have more but is waiting for you to say, "Be more with us." It's the little things that do that. It's always the little things in relationships. That's where those Google Alerts come back in. The little things like, knowing they got that new job. They had a grandchild. They lost someone they loved from the obituary that will come up on your screen. That's all stewardship. Stewardship, when we think about it in the five stages earlier, is a misnomer. We steward our relationships from the moment we meet someone or failed to steward them from the moment we meet them. Stewardship crosses boundaries in all of those other areas when we identify someone who could be a part of our mission lives and it doesn't take a whole lot of time to do that. We have four, almost five generations sitting in front of us and the interesting thing is as divided as we think we are as generations, I think as a Gen X-er of the okay boomer and the millennials who are ethically ignoring this generation in the middle who is now working into our prime giving years, how we think differently and the same about things. What I mean by that is I do large group studies with the different generations. Over and over, I hear from millennials that they love getting mail, that they love the moment when they open the mailbox and see a handwritten note or postcard that is interesting to them because the rest of their mail is not inspiring or junk mail because they've moved their bills to online payments so even bills don't come, but a handwritten note is a rare treat which they share with the loss generations deep sense that we are losing personal touch. A handwritten note for them and some of the older boomers, and I'm generalizing a little bit, but there's a lot of scientific data out there, both from my work and from others that back this up. These four generations are not so different. Gen X is just looking to be seen in a way. We are constantly told that we are the smallest, the most insignificant generation and yet here we sit in our insignificance being older parents and raising children and also taking care of ailing and aging loved ones. More and more, that pressed in generation in the center looking to be seen and knowing that we have a voice that we can use for our mission and are willing to do so if you can get to us. So often that impact would be deep if you knew what we were thinking and took the moment to see generation X. Here's the big practice tip for development. We don't have time for it. We have come to believe due to our electronics that the moment we see a text or email, we must answer it. For 30 minutes, when you get into the office in the morning, I want you to turn off your email alerts. That irritating little-- mine is off right now because I'm talking to you and you're important to me. It's not popping up in the corner of my screen constantly nagging, who wants to speak or get an immediate answer. I know that in the 45 minutes I spend with you this morning that no one will expire from my lack of answer because my honor of your time is to turn that off and set aside this time for you. Your first 30 minutes of the day are about donor acquisition, about those Google alerts and sending a personal touch. Do not answer your phone unless it's a donor or prospect that's returning your call or making the overture to call you. The voicemail will be there in 30 minutes and then ask for each action you make, are you moving relationships forward or is it transactional? Does your letter say I and we, or you? Does that phone call connect with the person at the other end of the line. Even a voicemail can be personal and interactive. Now, let's talk for a moment about Richard Branson, Virgin Airways. He says, "Don't take care of your customers, take care of your people and they will take care of your customers." To all of you who are sitting there saying, "Who's taking care of me? I sit here alone." I feel you. I run my companies alone. I have partners in some and colleagues, but even in those, I am one of the I hope leaders, I will say boss this morning and it's only at the top. What about professional development? How do we take care of ourselves or those that are colleagues that work with us? The database can do that too. There's something beautiful about thinking about our professional development, be it for ourselves or everyone involved. This report has the ability to tell us who we are in our development and donor world very, very quickly. Let's look at Bob and Marie very, very quickly so that I can tell you how we can use this for self-care. If we look at our assigned prospect total and if you don't have one, you need one, you need to start assigning some of these people to you. It is okay if they are merely acquisition targets, that cold word again. If you don't have a lot of definite prospects, then today reflect on those who've made an overturned and assign some of them to you or to the appropriate staff members to start working on, to think about, to set that Google alert to reach out. Bob has 50 assigned prospects and Marie has 72. As we look across at what's happened, we can see that Bob has a great deal of fewer gifts closed, but it's interesting that his percent number close, 40% of his gifts and dollars closed are 44%. Likewise, it's interesting that Marie closes more gifts as a percentage, 74%, but closes fewer dollars. I know having done this with large development staffs and small ones, that when I look at this type of report, I know or I'm close to knowing a couple of things right now. Bob is a consistent performer, but it's maybe the case that either his prospect pool isn't as good as we hope, but due to the amount of 54,000 closed out of that, it's possible that he's either asking too soon or not asking for the right projects. We can do a deep dive and see what he's doing by running his numbers and seeing, in those identification to solicitation, how long is Bob spending with those donors? Does he know them well enough? Does he understand their ability and affinity enough to make the right ask for them or is it too much money that he's asking for and has to ask for? Similarly, Marie, we can see that she closes the gifts, but leaves dollars on the table. Is it that she is overestimating her prospects or is it that she's asking too soon and not having deep enough relationships to drive that gift amount up with what are perhaps the right people? This becomes a very deep report for professional development for yourself as well. When I did run a large staff, I kept myself in this. I was always one of the fundraisers, never just the manager and it was always interesting to pick apart our numbers in a constructive way with each other and say, "What do you think of me?" It takes courage to put yourself up in your numbers up and say, "Staff, help me reflect on me. What do my numbers right now say about how I'm interacting with our donors?" That is a level of vulnerability that is game-changing inside. I engaged in doing it with my board too and being that vulnerable help them to talk about development in a deep way. We got along well and worked well together, but everything changed when I was willing to put what I did on a daily basis in reports in front of them. This relational fundraising, if you have a staff or even just yourself and it's self-care is a key to reducing turnover, which is another major conversation. For those of you scratching your heads right now wondering how this relates to acquisition, let me tell you very, very clearly that when you stay with donors, acquisition becomes easier because they can have a relationship with your mission through those people who stay. When you have deep turnover in your staff, donors start to be nervous about the future. Not just of your nonprofit, but of their relationships. They see that there's a revolving door and it doesn't feel like a safe space for them to come in and share their deep goals and impact and the dollars that are important to them because they invest them in what they are passionate about, not just goods and services that they perceive they want or need. When you reduce turnover, not only do you cost your organization less but you make acquisition a major priority because you're saying that, "We are here to stay. If you begin the relationship with us, you are likely to get to a happy end with us, those people that are in front of you now." I want you to think about the continuum of the nonprofit life. Of setting clear goals as people come in the door. Of having a team mindset. That means that if you have someone who works only on the database, and I say only very, very carefully. Because they don't get to go out and see that donor or close the gift. We spend a lot of time when we celebrate the gifts that come in from a mailing, celebrating the person who wrote the letter. The major planned gift gets a celebration for that executive director or gift officer, who brings the money through the door. Without the person that is deeply keeping your data, who is running these reports to make you efficient and better, that gift would never come through the door. Think of the team as one team that gets to the goal of donor acquisition altogether. I'm nodding to a program that I put in place years ago at a foundation with other colleagues called One Team With One Goal. When we became united in that way using our data and celebrating all the way through what we did together, our donors felt it deeply. They felt it so deeply that fundraising that year went from an average fundraise that we had done for years and years of $6 million to 12, in one year. The next year it jumped to 15.9. The secret to that improvement is what I'm talking about today and a deep impactful part of it was celebrating our team together. Finally, I credit my executive coach whose name was Dan and it's not who I ran into last night. I can't take credit for this. He once looked at a colleague of mine and said, "You make everything urgent. If everything rises to the level of urgent or important, then nothing is because it's all equal again." I want you to think about the way you approach your mission and your fundraising that way too. If everything on your plate today is urgent, then nothing is because you've elevated it all to the very same level which evens it out again urgent things are those things we must do to survive. Take everything today and look at that. Look at your volunteers, do they have a job description? They are your next acquisition. You say thank you but do you, is it little tokens of appreciation without the attention they so deserve to be seen? Here come those data points in Google alerts again? DonorPerfect insights. If you use it to compile everything about your donor and truly see them in your thank you’s it will change how you interact. Let's put it all together for a moment because I know we want time for some questions or what you've been doing. I will see those in just a second and be able to spend a few minutes with you, I hope. Big data drives relationships but it helps you to do it efficiently. Donor prospecting is dating full in love with your prospects. The only way to fall in love is to get to know someone. You need to make the overture of the U take a little time each day and never forget that if everything is urgent then nothing is, I will close that. Someone said, "Hi everyone. This is me in LA." Can I make that public, was that meant for Lori? Yes, One Team With One Goal is always meant for Lori and I'm so happy to see you. Lori is my host here at DonorPerfect. I'm so happy to see that some folks I'm working with that I love dearly. I fall in love with my clients? Joe and Lori, I'm so happy you're here today. It's good to see you. I see somebody said, "I like that One Team One Goal," so did they. There was so much love on the team with that. Erin asks, "What are your thoughts on properly thanking a donor? Is it a phone call, a token or a combination?" Erin it is always a written note of some type unless they live somewhere that they can't get that. The post office is making that challenging these days. If they love email, then truly that. What about filming yourself? If they can only get that email? What about getting on your phone or this, there are a million-- a zoom account that's free. You can quick zoom a thank you that is very short and say, "Look, I just wanted to look at you today and look in the camera and say thank you for what you've done. It's so important to me that you see and feel our gratitude because without you, we could not," and give that impact statement. A phone call can do that but we have all this technology and all this big data, put it to you and be personalized in what you do. Hey Lori I can see you. Lori: Hi. Meredith: Handwritten notes and cards. Absolutely. A postcard, don't be afraid to send a handwritten postcard. Get a bunch of postcards, they're cheaper than cards but when we go through our mail, this is an invitation of almost everybody now, we're right next to the garbage can but a postcard, I will always turn over. I just want to see what it says and so if somebody wrote on the back of that, I'll flip it and see it. "What about the standard thanks letters to donors that contribute regularly." This is again where we're going to use our DonorPerfect database. In July, I want you to take a day and write different thank you letters for the whole year and the season and then just update them with what's going on when you get to that season and load a new thank you letter in so that donors are seeing that you care enough to update it. That it's not just some form letter. Lori: Meredith I hate to do but I have to stop you because we're going to start to run over at this point and we have a session butting up right next to this. I do thank everyone for attending our first session for day two. For this presentation Meredith, I saw some great comments come through and it was a pleasure to have you with us today. We have another session that is coming up here. We have community based fundraising with [unintelligible 00:46:09] and then we have DonorPerfect tool series. Just so you know, these sessions are being recorded. Whatever session you miss, you can always pick up later. Pick a track and join in on that session. It will start now so once we close out this head over to whatever room you decide to go to, thanks for attending today. [00:47:12] [END OF AUDIO]

Community-Based Fundraising with Oregon Food Bank

Speakers: Vivien Trinh, Celia Ferrer, Vicky Schwoeffermann, C. Nathan Harris

Description

In January 2020, the Community Philanthropy team at Oregon Food Bank (OFB) embarked upon a transformational paradigm shift in our philosophical and practical approach to resourcing an end to hunger and hunger’s root causes: As individual staff and as a team, our performance would no longer be evaluated based upon the financial outcomes of our work. Instead, together, we would design and implement philanthropic development programs — and relevant assessments — oriented to new metrics rooted in love and equity.

Transcript

Sean: Good morning and afternoon to everybody. Thank you, first off, for your patience while we were taking care of some technical issues, but now we are ready to go. My name is Sean. I want to introduce to you the Community Philanthropy team at Oregon Food Bank. They have embarked upon a transformational paradigm shift in their approach to ending hunger and hunger's root causes. They no longer evaluate their performance based upon the financial outcomes of their work, instead, they design and implement philanthropic development programs oriented to new metrics rooted in love and equity. As always, any conversation you want to have amongst yourself, you can do in the chat. Any questions that you'd like to pose to the team, please put in the Q&A for us. That's everything I've got. Nathan, you can take it away. Nathan: Hello, good morning. I'm Nathan Harris Director of Community Philanthropy at Oregon Food Bank. The voice coming through your computer from the great digital divide. We're going to take a minute to offer a land acknowledgment and then provide a bit of context about Oregon Food Bank, our organization, and our communities. You can join me by using the link presented on this slide, to learn more about the first peoples who occupied the lands that you now may reside upon, [unintelligible 00:01:42] policies of genocide and relocation. Oregon Food Bank facilities run some traditional village sites of the Multnomah, Cathlamet, Clackamas, [unintelligible 00:01:54], Malheur, and many other tribes who made their homes along the Columbia River. We thank the descendants of these tribes for being the original stewards and protectors of these lands since time immemorial and we are honored to be guests upon these lands. Let me share a bit about Oregon Food Bank, our vision, and our mission. Our vision over the next 10 years is to build resilient communities that never go hungry, and for more than 30 years, our mission has been to end hunger and hunger's root causes so no one goes hungry. We believe that the root causes of hunger include poverty and systemic inequity drives poverty. Hunger is the result of the failure of systems meant to protect us. Lack of affordable housing, accessible healthcare, and living-wage jobs, and that is made possible due to disparate distributions of wealth, power, and represented voice that most often leave behind Black, Indigenous, and people of color, immigrants and refugees, transgender and gender non-conforming folks, and single mothers and caregivers. Those in our community who face the highest and disproportionate rates upon them. This vision and our mission have been daunted, in part, by COVID-19. It's definitely presented a challenge. Many in our community have long endured systemic inequities that drive hunger. In the past year, COVID-19 exposed this reality had exacerbated it. Hunger nearly doubled. Prior to the pandemic, one in 11 of our neighbors faced hunger and that escalated to nearly 1 in 5 in our region in the past year. This has been felt particularly by Black, Indigenous, and people of color communities, as well as immigrant and refugee communities. Among the immigrant and refugee communities, the economic impact of COVID-19 can be even more severe for those who do not qualify for public safety net benefits like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program called SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, as well as services like unemployment or stimulus payments. We believe it doesn't have to be this way. Imagine that community power encompassing over a million people experiencing hunger. Those people access food, the meal sites, and food assistance sites at 1,400 locations across our region. Food is sourced to those sites by 21 regional food banks that receive food from Oregon Food Bank statewide warehouse. While we distribute that food, we work alongside movement building and policy advocacy partners, because we believe that it's a moral imperative to feed our neighbors facing hunger, and when the systems meant to protect us exclude our people and beget hunger, we work within this ecosystem to make systems change. We work with all of these partners the agricultural industry, food retailers, farmers, farmworkers, state and federal elected officials, activists and boards. Our organization has a $34 million operating budget this fiscal year with staff over 200 employees and more than 50% of us have lived experience of hunger. We are the leaders ending hunger who have the knowledge of lived experience of hunger to end hunger. Within the Community Philanthropy team, we have 35 incredible human beings working with 63,000 annual donors and 40,000 annual volunteers to resource and end the hunger and hunger's root causes. Three of my colleagues are joining me today and I would like them to introduce themselves before we get fully into our presentation. Vicky: Thanks, Nathan, I'll go first and pass it along to my colleagues. Hello, everyone. I'm so excited to be with you. My name is Vicky Schwoeffermann, and I'm the Community Philanthropy senior strategist at the Oregon Food Bank. My role is largely to work closely with our Community Philanthropy team to drive forward emergent and transformative programs that really foster collaboration across stakeholder groups. With my role, I focus on integrating equity and social justice into donor engagement programs, and I support driving forward our 10-year strategic vision and the ways to do that. Now, I'd like to pass it over to Vivien. Vivien: Thank you, Vicky. My name is Vivien Trinh. I use she/her pronouns. I am the Community Philanthropy Associate Director of Operations. I'm a builder, I create systems and process to support our teams as they navigate our theory of change, build relationships with our supporters, their staff, and our work. In addition to that, I oversee the database team and the prospect development team. I'm going to pass it over to Celia. Over to Celia. Celia: Hi, good morning or good afternoon if you're on the East Coast. I'm Celia Ferrer and my pronouns are she and her. I'm the Corporate and Community Relations Manager for the Oregon Food Bank. I lead a team of developers or community philanthropists or, I'd like to call them philanthropic disruptors. We manage corporate portfolios, do food and fund drives. We process community gifts and we also do community events, partner events, and workplace giving. This is a special time at the Oregon Food Bank because we're in a special point of growth. I feel like my role includes building an infrastructure poised for growth that is focused on equity and sustainability ensuring that we put our clients in the center of what we do and our hope is to develop new matrices for love. I'll kick it back to Nathan. Nathan: Thanks, Celia. Nathan Harris, Director of Community at Oregon Food Bank. For the rest of our time today, I'm going to provide a little bit of background about Oregon Food Bank's area of change and the Community Philanthropy team. Then we're going to move into an interview with Celia, Vicky, and Vivien. Everything that I referenced and that we talked about is linked to additional resources through a handout that is connected to this conference presentation. I welcome you all to find that handout, click through the links. There you can find resource that we referenced and tools we've developed that we may allude to during our time together. Our purpose on the Community Philanthropy team Oregon Food Bank is to encourage, engage, and equip our community to take philanthropic action and build political power and service to Oregon Food Bank's vision and mission. Our theory of change in shorthand has decentering money to center love and equity. In January of 2020, the Oregon Food Bank Community Philanthropy team adopted this new theory of change, sparking its transformational change initiative that has touched every facet of our work as we apply it to every discipline, every role within our team at Oregon Food Bank. Why have we adopted this theory of change? In short, it's to create a more just experience of philanthropy for our staff and donors. We believe that an orientation to financial outcomes is a gateway to harm rooted in White supremacist, colonial capitalist constructs that exploit people in the greedy extraction and hoarding of resources. Some examples of this show up as sexual harassment at the fundraisers. One in four women in our profession and of those who report sexual harassment, 65% name donors as the perpetrators of sexual harassment. We know that women in our profession, according to their self-reporting, may not actually interrupt sexual harassment or report it when a large gift is on the line, or if they fear their career would be impacted by not raising as much resource. We know that there is racial bias in the nonprofit sector and that less than 10% of those in our profession are black, indigenous and people of color. We know that CEOs and EDs report feeling at a disadvantage in raising financial resources for the nonprofits that they lead in contrast over our counterparts, even when those same EDs of CEOs describe themselves as more visionary and representative of the community served by nonprofits. We know that the nonprofit sector recreates racial hierarchies and advantages rooted and white supremacy. We've seen research on an Exodus from our profession rooted in distress and pressure of unrealistic financial goals. Right now, those attending this conference among us 51%, may be contemplating leaving their current job right now and 30% are contemplating leaving the profession altogether. We see donor attrition from donors feeling like they're treated as financial targets, and we know from giving USA that while more and more money may be given every year to charitable causes, fewer and fewer households are given. This could be due to the growing wealth gap in the United States and it could be due to the fact that when donors seek to do good in the world and join movements for social change, what they find is that they're treated like just another transaction, just like in the for-profit marketplace. How do we create a more just experience? We theorize that a reclamation of philanthropy's true meaning, any voluntary act for the common good root, a love for humankind will bring into balance our professions, historic and disproportionate orientation to financial outcomes. By bringing into balance, what we mean is that we of course have financial goals at Oregon Food Bank. We are proud to be resource mobilizers helping in hunger and hunger's root causes through a more just distribution of wealth. We believe that money can be healing. I often think about [unintelligible 00:12:35] words of money as reparation. Money like water can create fertile soil and the field that once experienced drought and water can also be pushed through a house at high volumes and sprayed at protestors to suppress first amendment rights. Money is complex, and what we are acknowledging is that we cannot continue operating in a status quo paradigm where money is paramount. By centering love and equity and decentering money we're fostering innovation, this approach touches every facet of our work and forces us to rethink what we do and why. It roots our evaluation in activities, not outcomes. What we can control are the activities that we design and implement with excellence that we theorize will create certain outcomes, but we cannot control our donor decisions. Decentering money to center of and equity, allows us to engage supporters as holistic actors and facilitate more authentic relationship development with our supporters, that then in turn democratizes philanthropy that makes philanthropy more accessible. It orients us to make philanthropy more welcoming to all people. It helps to interrupt a charity model. We instead of saying to our donors that a meal solves hunger, and that is a very common message that generates strong financial outcomes. Instead, we can tell the true story of hunger and tell the true solution of hunger. It is true that we could feed someone who is hungry today, and that is a moral imperative. If we don't address the root causes of hunger, that person will be hungry again tomorrow, and the day after. Finally, this theory of change intends to cultivate a market diverse team and profession in which the integrity and wellbeing of love at community, both donors and staff, are valued more than money. That is our intent with this theory of change and I want to move into some Q & A, with my colleagues here on the call with me and they can speak from their perspectives and experiences, what it's like working within this theory of change. My first question as I've shared a bit about our intent, I'd love to hear more from each of you, and two of you joined our team after we had implemented this transformation change initiative. You knew full way out well what you were getting yourselves into and all three of you have been leaders in championing this theory against implementation. Tell me, why is this undertaking so paramount to you in your own words? Vivien: I can go first. As the person who was at Oregon Food Bank at the beginning of the journey, I started at Oregon Food Bank about seven years ago. It was my job to create reports on the financial outcomes. I knew going into it, it was not a great direction to go to, and it turns out I was right. I should have trusted my instincts, but I went forward with it instead of checking myself. I witnessed firsthand the morale impacts it had on staff much to Nathan's point earlier, focusing so much on financial outcomes, particularly at the developer level led to a culture of fear. When you are operating in that type of culture, you are unable to innovate and be creative to really take risks to try things a different and new way. One of the ways it showed up was that portfolios were just too large. If you have financial goals, you're just gonna keep the donors that you have instead of shrinking them and taking the time to build those really deep transformational relationships. Then, what that leads to is burnout, it leads to overwhelm and then folks are like, "You know what? I'm out of here, this isn't for me anymore." At the time, particularly on the prospect development realm, we weren't really having these types of conversations. It's much better now, but seven years ago, it wasn't really even on our radar, we knew there was turnover within our gift developer colleagues, but we couldn't really figure out why. The impact had on me was that it really made me feel disconnected from my colleagues, from the organization, even from the mission, I didn't feel values aligned with the equity work that the organization was doing, because I was seeing this disconnect. What this theory of change really allows for within myself for me is that it inspires me to continue being in philanthropy, to continue being a fundraiser. It gets me out of bed in the morning and my hope is that by focusing on centering love and equity, I'm helping create a different experience for both the donors and my colleagues. Vicky: Thank you so much, Vivien. Your comments brought up for me definitely burnout. That rings true for me. I've been in philanthropy for 50 years now and when I first started as a newbie, I wanted to please everyone on my portfolio, I want to please my supervisors and my internal team and so in the attempt to do that, I asked the question for how do we measure or success and what does success look like? I kept getting different answers from people but the infrastructure that I was working with at the time seemed to reward those who were bringing millions of dollars in the door. Naturally, I chased money, and that happiness or that feeling can only be sustained for so long before you start to question, "How long will this impact continue to live on throughout our communities and within myself? How long will this relationship be able to stay in intact and run its course?" Because there's only so many times you can go back to a donor for money. There's only so many times you can reach out to that donor and have that awkward moment where the donor knows you're reaching out for money, you know you're reaching out for one thing and you start walking into these meetings. From my experience, I start walking into these meetings less and less of myself. I didn't feel like I could truly be authentic with sharing my passion and my heart with the donor, and because I was so focused on that financial goal, I realized it was impacting our relationship, so I couldn't in turn actively listen to what drives a donor as well. We are all donors in a way. We have all decided what we want to lend our time our talent and our treasure to and to allow an opportunity or to create an opportunity where someone can be fully seen for their fullness and not just the dollars that they may or may not have in the bank or in their pocket, I found gave our communications, gave my conversations much more of depth to it. It allowed me to feel more fulfilled from the amount of time I'm using and taking away from my family to spend getting to know strangers in the community and trying to connect folks to opportunities to further their passion and to further the legacy that they want to live. I found that through this paradigm shift that we're undertaking here at the Oregon Food Bank, I found that it was so important because from the beginning when I started in philanthropy up until now, I found that's really, in my opinion, the only true way to approach philanthropy, so that I can sustain my endurance in the field. I can walk away with creating and bridging relationships that weren't there before, and therefore elevating our communities to a higher level. Then we even if it's not possible, and I could still achieve fulfillment and happiness while I do that. It was like a jack of all trades or a win situation for everyone involved. When I got in contact with Oregon Food Bank, I realized that we were taking this concept and providing an opportunity for people to safely test it out, and to also learn along the way, and to also have a voice in helping to shape how philanthropy could look. That appealed to me so much that was like--I felt like I was taking in fresh air. I didn't realize and incoming on board that it would be an opportunity for me to also heal from my past traumas, the past harms that I've encountered from allowing money to drive a conversation. There's a lot of harms that I would sweep under the rug because I thought the end goal is a dollar amount. Instead, I can share my heart with someone else free of fear that the only thing we're talking about is money. The last thing I'll say is when I realized that I could shift my approach in this work, and that it would be supported by an organization like Oregon Food Bank, I realized that the money was the easy part. Relationships are the hardest part, and relationships take time. I'm really grateful for a team that allows me to take time to go deep so that we can then go wide. Celia: Oh my goodness, preach. Preach, so many things from what Vicky said strongly resonated with me. The question is, why is this undertaking so paramount to us? I'd have to borrow some of the words you use Vicky because that's exactly how I feel about my work. This is the air I breathe. This is in fact very healing for me and indulge me I'll keep the story short, I can't explain my answer without sharing a short story. I'm an Asian American. I moved to the US about 12 years ago. I came from the corporate sector. I worked as a director for corporate affairs in advertising and public relations, doing corporate work for about 15 years. Then I moved here and then I became a parent and then got divorced and got so deflated. I was a full-time mom for a while, and then I got divorced in this new world. The Philippines where I come from is very Americanized, but so coming here, living here on my own without familial support is so new to me, and my world came crumbling down. When that world crumbled down, I thought, "My God, this is so hard, but then I might have an opportunity to really rebuild my life the way I want to." It's not like a Rubik's cube. It's not like changing just one side or the other side, but really just taking everything apart and putting it back together. I decided I had very good more years in my life as an executive, what are my talents? Where do I want to devote my skills? What do I really want to do? I knew that whatever it was, I didn't want it to be something that's solely hinged on the bottom line because that's what I focused on as a crisis communication expert and advertising and public relations, I was concerned about the bottom line. I was concerned about the one specific strategy that works that best every other strategies, the winning strategy, and that changed me as a person. I went after the money. I went after relationships that would give me access and power and money, and I just didn't want that because I didn't want that as the world that I would leave behind for my kids. I identify as a queer, single immigrant mother. In this new world of mine that I wanted to rebuild, I wanted it to be closer to who I really am, and who I want to be. When the opportunity came to work for a nonprofit, I would choose things that--Really, I would choose nonprofits that really advocated for the values that I believe in. To be honest, like four or five years ago, I checked out the Oregon Food Bank, and I felt they were talking about their equity journey then. I felt it was to check boxie, racial equity, we wanted to hire more bipoc folks, but I had several conversations with people from then it felt check boxie. I thought, no, because I really want to live a brave life, and that meant taking risks really going for it. I worked for other nonprofits, but lo and behold when COVID happened, there were so many openings of the Oregon Food Bank, and I thought, I really want to work for the Oregon Food Bank because food security and food justice, and racial justice are things I strongly believe in. Then I got a call from Nathan Harris, oh, my God on a Sunday, and we had--He said, "There's a position open, would you consider it?" It turned out to be a lovely one-hour conversation about what the Oregon Food Bank is doing, the equity journey. Nathan talked about decentering money and developing matrices to do that. I'm like, "What, really? How do you plan to do this?" He was honest enough to say, "We haven't quite figured that out yet perfectly, but we're going to and we really want to and we really want to." That for me was such an authentic, honest answer that it inspired me and I felt, I have some skills, I have the passion to do this, I want to do this and this is so much in line with who I want to become. That courage over fear, that wanting to provide access for myself, my kids, my community, my family, and for everyone. Really fighting for racial justice and not be whoo about saying we're going to do it, and then not putting gas on the pedal. Now a year after, so I have accepted the position. I feel like everyone is really working towards a more equitable community, and that inspires me every day. I am so thankful that I'm here, and I continue this work because I feel that it really resonates with who I really am deep down. Nathan: That story is such a great transition to the next question, Sonia. I just want to echo a couple of things that I heard one is that I, Vicky so resonate with this idea that as very emotionally intelligent creatures, human beings, that the idea of being in a relationship with somebody when you're perceiving them as some--with through a lens of objectification, right, when it's a financial target, I think that as much as this experience may be healing for us in the profession. I think it's also very healing for donors to be able to sit across the table from you and not feel through that emotional intelligence, the objectification of them as a potential financial gift. I think that's such a powerful idea in moving not just our profession, but the philanthropic sector at large. Celia, I just wanted to celebrate what you shared. I have skills. I can do this. I think that we sometimes forget that our profession has so much influence and so much power that we are culture maker. We are movement builders. We are Vanguards. We don't have to do things the way we've always done them and we know best relationships. Your point though, about, how do we measure love? I shamelessly borrow from the Broadway musical rent the lyric. How do you measure a year? What about love? That is in fact the name of our workshop today. We're often asked about the technical realities of measuring love and the handout that we provided to attendees give some examples of assessments we've created focused on staff and donor, excuse. Those are just two of myriad ways we're measuring love. I'd like to ask you each, this might be a hard question I'm going to push you. I'd love to hear from each of you about one way, each, that we're measuring love that most resonates with you. Celia: I love how we change up some of the framing of the question sometimes in the conferences that we attend. Something popped in mind, something really popped in my mind, and that is having difficult conversations with long time donors who don't see the same tactics despite the same strategies. As an example, the Oregon Food Bank as with most of the corporate partners that we manage believe in economic progress and resilience. Now, how that looks like may look very different from your vantage point. For us, sometimes we support bills that we think would be favorable to our constituents, that would even the playing field, that would challenge the systemic racism that we are experiencing. Some of our corporate partners might not agree with that and so love for us would then mean have a conversation with us, if you decide to use money as a source of power and thread and to pull out, that's your decision, we will respect it. If we have been long-term partners, then talk to us, explain to us where you're coming from. We'd love to tell you also of our position because it's a relationship and the financial gift is just one expression of love. The conversation is another. Continuing or discontinuing the relationship is another measurement of love. Vicky: Thank you, Celia. I want to piggyback on that as well. All of you are my muse, so I'll just share that, get so inspired by you and the work that we do collectively. One of the things that we've highlighted this year and lifted up is a really important aspect of our work is collecting stories, lifting perspectives, and voices that for whatever reason we haven't lifted before. We haven't necessarily tracked and followed up with and prioritized adding it to our efforts to change the narrative of hunger and its root causes. A lot of our language and our work is talking about equity and racism. If you don't know what that has to do with hunger, I encourage you to read some of the materials that have been provided, no judgment, no shame. It's an opportunity for us to know more and do better. I love that we are-- Originally, we call this mission moments. We are collecting stories that represent the true narrative of hunger, represent the true obstacles and barriers that stand in the way of people thriving, of communities thriving for generations to come that stand in the way of building generational wealth. We're acknowledging that talking about it and that is allowing us to engage in hard conversations as well that Celia alluded to. I love the fact that we are focusing on love through changing narrative, through storytelling. There are so many causes here in Oregon. It's hard to sometimes wrap your arms around what to do first, how to help how to get involved. I strongly believe the way to build a movement the way to create relationships that are built on trust and strength is by listening and sharing and using our power that each of us have to lift up our brothers and sisters and fellow humans in our community. We can't do that if we try to simplify the stories that we think we're hearing, or if we try to add our perspective on what is the truth for someone with lived experience of hunger. I love that that is a key component to our work. We're tracking those stories through many different how do I say it? Through many different ways. It's also being tracked in terms of how do we add an affinity rating for a person who has shared their story, that is also a donor. Oftentimes, I have thought about donors as only giving of a certain level, but anyone has the capacity to be a donor. Many times, the funds that are hitting our Oregon Food Bank account are from people who get it. They either have lived experience of hunger. They either know someone in their community that has lived experience of hunger. They either know or have of experienced communities being marginalized and put aside and being told that, you're just lazy. That's why you're, that's why you're in poverty or that's why you're dealing with hunger and to be able to be brave, to lend your voice, to be able to stand up and say, that's not a true representation of many situations is just a powerful moment. It's a powerful thing to be able to do. That is largely due to trust-building people don't share stories unless they trust. I view the sharing of stories as a way to measure how much love we are infusing into this profession, how much love we're sharing with the community and how much love the community is responding back to us with. I just appreciate, again, the space to be able to do that and to work so closely across our team because the other thing I'll notice is sometimes like when you work for organizations, there can be silos and not a lot of conversations between those who may be having conver conversation with different stakeholders in the community. I really love how we work collaboratively to share what we're hearing, what we're learning from community members and help it to inform every aspect of our work. Vivien: That's amazing Vicky. We've given this presentation a couple of times and every time it still gives me chills. It's so inspiring. I joked with Nathan when we started to really develop what it meant to measure love. I was like, Nathan, I think this broke my relationship with the database. Measuring love is such a nuance thing. What is it even? The database is like ones and zeros and binaries. I was like, "How do you make those two things meet? How do you honor the experiences that our developers are having in the field?" Those types of really meaningful relationships, they're building those conversations around equity and going along their journey of understanding of what the root causes of hunger are. Something that I'm super excited about is that we just, this year rolled out a process for coding our contact reports along various indicators of love. so that as the developers are entering information into the database, they're taught they can code actions if they're really having deep discussions about equity, if the donor or even Oregon Food Bank or the developer went along a journey of growth in their understanding of the work. If there was a moment where there was really shared deep values that were built between them. These different ways of bringing qualitative information into a quantitative database is something that I'm really excited about, that by the end of the year, we'll have this information of all the different ways. Love is showing up in our communities in our donor relationships, and it will allow my team to think about portfolio optimization and realignment in a different way, focusing less on money and more of the quality of the relationship. Something that's super interesting about it too is that, we're giving the developers a lot of freedom to interpret what those indicators mean for themselves. It becomes less of a metric to measure performance and more of a metrics about how the person is experiencing the work. That's so different, right? Like a lot of the reports that are created are trying to drive behavior. Whereas, these reports, the hope is that it is a chance to reflect on your relationship with the work and your relationship with the mission. That is something that I'm super excited about. Nathan: Okay. A couple of thoughts. I think the way I measure love most is, through the stories of our team members who are typically experiencing philanthropy in a more just way, and experience the work in a more just way which may get into our next question, but there's a question in the chat, and I think it's kind of relevant to a point that Vicky was making earlier, and the question was about how this theory of change is transcribed into an experience of donors giving at any level, like monthly donors or maybe grassroots-giving donors. I often talk about bell hooks' definition of love as the extension of oneself for one's own or another's spiritual growth. We often talk about love in the context of political journey. To me, bell hooks' definition and the political journey are very similar ideas. That, I think, is how the philosophy of decentering money to center love and equity, can be felt through programs on our team that particularly engage grassroots donors, that we may not be able to manage, as we manage major donor relationships through one-on-one relationship building, that may not be feasible at a scale where we've got 63,000 annual donors. The question is, how do we create a different kind of experience for grassroots-giving donors within the context of this theory of change? We may not be able to treat them all like major donors, but we can definitely treat them differently. That may look like increased engagement opportunities, civic engagement opportunities, increased action-taking, education cultivation, but we want is, for our donors not to feel as though we're asking them for money every time we connect with them, but that we're creating an experience that is equitable across our many giving programs. That said, I want to shift to this idea of a more just experience of philanthropy for staff and donors. We aspire to build a more diverse team and profession that we talk about as valuing the integrity and well-being of staff and donors more than the financial outcomes from our relationship building. We've linked in our handout to the community philanthropy staff bill of rights as one example. We've created standard operating procedures to try to make real that intent through the community philanthropy staff bill of rights. Some of our work includes safety planning templates for staff to prepare for experiences with donors, a strategic decision-making framework for ending relationships when that makes the most sense, and we've even begun to contemplate how to integrate restorative justice processes into our interactions with donors when harm has occurred. Those are just some examples and all of those examples can be linked to through the handout that we shared. From your experience, Vicky, Celia, Vivien, in no particular order, is our theory of change facilitating a more just experience of philanthropy for you, or based upon your insights for our donors, and if you think that's true, how is it creating a more just experience? What does that look like? Vivien: For myself, I think that it's a different kind of pressure, right? Instead of the pressure of raising financial goals, the pressure becomes to do right by your community, which is the type of pressure you want in this work. I think it's true that leadership is, it takes vulnerability to try something new to put yourself out there, but in that vulnerability, we can learn about one another more authentically, and really make those connections and relationships that sustain us in this work. It therefore feels more collaborative, right? Vicky was talking about working within silos. When you're working within this theory, you are more willing to be in relationship with your colleagues because you're not feeling like you're in competition with them. For me, it's an opportunity to build community with one another, to build community with our neighbors, to build community with the larger ecosystem of organizations that are working towards social justice, because we're operating in this theory of abundance, right? Like it's not our donors, it's not Oregon Food Bank donors. It's our donors, it is our community and we are working toward the same vision. I hope for our donors that it, what it feels like is, that the relationships aren't there just for relationship's sake, it is relationship with purpose. Our Assistant Manager of Prospect Research, Brandon Baez, he's so great at saying like, "All right, how is this relationship going to dismantle white supremacy?" I'm always like, "Oh, yes, such a good framework to bring into these donor conversations." Right? It's really like, it's connecting our donors to meaningful action and meaningful steps to ending hunger and its root causes. Celia: I can go next. I'm already almost sad that we only have 15 minutes, [laughs] because there's really so much to talk about that. I want to share what the Oregon Food Bank is really focusing on, and these are, a new leadership, a new story, a new bounty, a new local focus and a new wave. A shout out to Nicole, because she said or they said- sorry, I don't know your pronouns- You know that you're a visual learner and you want to be able to visualize what we're doing. I'm going to try to give you a bit of visual examples for a new leadership. How has our theory of change shown in our new leadership? In recruiting for people to work for the food bank, it was important for us in this point of growth as we hire and recruit people, to find people who really understand what it means to be hungry, to have that lived experience. In the absence of lived experience, to really understand people who experience hunger are going through. We need to put them as leads in this. They can't just be soldiers doing the task. They need to lead us because they know the best way to move us all forward. That's an example of how we practice a new leadership. A new story. We live in a world that has been dictated by white supremacy and racial injustice for so long, that we felt the need not just to bring people along with us into our journey, because there's a shift from equality to equity and how we view that is, instead of just rallying people along, we really need to put people who have been in the margins for so long at the center of our work. That is the story that we want to share, that is the story that we want people who believe in this journey with us to co-create with us. A new bounty. We want to operate in the spirit of abundance. As an example, when we have big partnerships, we feel like, maybe we can share some of those dollars with local partners who are not as big as the Oregon Food Bank but who are in partnership with us, not just financially but values-wise. Do they help us make calls to Congress when there's a bill that needs to be pushed? Do they help volunteer with us? Looking at the new bounty, we share with them our resources and our heart. A new local focus. One of the big shifts that happened during COVID is that, we shifted food drives from being centralized to our headquarters, to sharing them directly to smaller pantries because it takes us about four to six weeks to actually process food before we are able to fully distribute them to regional food banks and different pantries. We felt, instead of routing all these food drives to the headquarters, especially with COVID and the challenges of not having volunteers to do repack shifts, why don't we shift the focus to introducing smaller food pantries and also regional food bank directly to the donors, especially when they're centrally located. It makes geographic sense to just have them deliver the food directly there. By doing that, we're creating a stronger community by introducing partners to one another, providing the toolkit that would help them actually do that effectively because that's one of our stronger resources. We've been doing this food resourcing and distribution for so long, we pretty much know how to do it quite well and so we share those resources. Then also as a new wave. We ask ourselves, what do we need to do in order to really question and fight systemic racism? That's how we try to do our work and that's how we try to practice our theory of change. In all this, we welcome people who are working at the food bank to present themselves in their fullness because we are not just workers, we're human beings. We're mothers, we're parents, we're fathers, we're brothers, we're family members, we're friends, we're lovers. We factor this in everything we do because we know that that is what fuels our passion for the work that we do. Vicky: Snaps. Thank you, Celia. Thank you. I hate to go after these two amazing answers. The last thing I'll share on this, because I believe that what was shared was so beautifully stated and so true from my experience and my perspective as well is, I think that we are focused on doing what is right. That doesn't mean it's easy. It's not easy to talk with your staff about, because of the systemic issues we've all been birthed into, people of color are under attack. With our policies, with our processes, with just the way we think it has been right to go about our work. How do we put a stop to that, and how do we acknowledge the fact that it's not going to be perfect how we move this work forward, but we are committed to doing what is right, and evaluating our intentions and putting our actions behind our words. That is not easy to do. That takes a continual commitment to adjust experience for everyone involved. I think one of the tangible examples for me is diversifying what our portfolios look like. To me, it is not fair to come and give of myself in a profession where I am told, "Only white people, only old white men are worth speaking to because they have the power and the money, and so, I need you to set up these meetings with old white men, Vicky, and be harmed in the process and ask them for money." That's not fair. [laughs] That's not fair to me. What is fair to me is, to actually be in a situation, to actually be in an environment where we value people's values. We question, how is this going to hurt or harm our communities? Is this conversation, is this relationship worth it? Are we a part of perpetuating harm? It is fair for me to be able to bring my Black and Brown sisters and brothers to the table, to not only engage in conversation that can help us be better, hold us accountable to what we're doing, but also can have a chance to throw money on the table too. Black and Brown people, I don't know where the perception came that these communities don't have money, these communities can't be donors as well and can't be treated with the utmost respect, but many times that is an assumption that is perpetuated through sometimes overt ways of doing the work and subtle ways of doing the work. A just experience for me is, creating fair game for everyone to figure out a way to contribute to this mission of eliminating hunger and its root causes. We're all not starting from the same place. The standpoint of pull yourself up by your bootstraps, some of us weren't given boots or straps. That's just being real right there. I am committed to trying to even out the playing field and also being equitable. That means equality is like inviting everyone to the party, but oftentimes we don't go to the equitable side and say, "You know what, everyone at the party is not going to get the same food. Some people are going to get a bigger amount of food because they've got a lot more barriers that stood in their way and folks need to be okay with that." We are not functioning from a deficit mindset. We are functioning from, there is more than enough and how do we make it right to share these resources? It's extremely important to me, and it's extremely imperative, I think, that all of us question what are we doing to contribute to making a more just experience for everyone we touch in this profession, for everyone we onboard and we train and we mentor, for everyone we attach ourselves to as to be mentored? How are we creating an experience that is better than the one that we've experienced? This is like a pitch. Some of us may do the donors. Don't you want to leave the world better than where you found it? [laughs] That's just low-hanging fruit for lack of a better phrase. That same question I challenge all of us to ask ourselves is, how are we creating a fair, equitable, just, experience for everyone that we have the privilege of touching and for everyone who has entrusted themselves into our care? The most, again, the tangible experience for me that I'm extremely passionate about is, making sure I see some faces in our portfolios that look like me, that look like Celia, that look like Vivien, that look like Nathan, and they're not all looking one way. It's just not-- we can do better than that. I just want to share that's my experience and that's what I'm really passionate about in terms of what we're doing at the Oregon Food Bank. Nathan: I do think that we're creating something better than we've ever known. One of Celia's earlier comments, we haven't figured it out yet. We're in this process. We have many miles to go, even acknowledging that it's not a destination we're trying to reach, that it is in fact a journey of liberation as we talked about in our purpose statement as a department. There's one final question that I think is important that we answer. It's been given seven up votes in the Q&A chat. The question is about how the transformational change was embraced by board and leadership, how it was rolled out. There's also some extra question about nuts and bolts. I just want to say that there's a blog post I provided in the chat that you can link to it through the handout. From my point of view, a lot of organizational culture work had been done prior to January of 2020, at which point we embraced this change. Vivien was leading equity and fundraising discussions within the department for years. I showed up, two weeks on the job, I sent an email to the team saying, "We will no longer be evaluated based on the financial outcomes of our work, instead we will co-create new metrics rooted in love and equity." I'm not necessarily advocating that that is the best way to initiate change, although it was our way, and you might find your own way. I would say that the team has experienced it both, an unhinging of inertia, and for some people that change was very uncomfortable. In our process of managing change, we were intentional about lifting what is your fear, and what are your assumptions about the consequences of this change that drive your fear? We tried at the very least to be very open and honest about that. As we close our time together, because we just have like one minute left, I want to ask Vicky, Celia, and Vivien, in response to that question with the seven upvotes, what advice would you give, very briefly, to anyone who is interested in making this change in their organizations? Vivien: I think you touched on this, Nathan. I think it is one thing to say we're going to do this, but if the culture isn't supportive of it, then you're going to hit many walls. It is still worth trying. That first small step you can do is, start building that culture through many different ways. You can start a book club, you can start a little group of folks who are willing to explore what this means, learn, create a standard way of thinking and talk that standard way, but a common language amongst themselves. There's that first step, is just really like culture setting. That is something that you can do with just a coalition of the willing. You don't have to bring everyone along. You have to just identify who your allies are, who your accomplices are, and partner with them closely in moving the work forward. Celia: I just want to share that love really rocks, that love rules. It is love that will allow us to be our stronger selves, our braver selves, despite the fear and the challenges and the uncertainties and the unknown. Be brave. What does that mean for us? Everything we do, every gift, every volunteer work, every challenging conversations that we decide to take on and have this fight, you know how nervous we are by doing it. Every change that would bring people in the margins closer to the center, or closely linked with one another, is a radical act of love. That's what I'm gunning for. Vicky: I'll keep mine short. Encouragement is, anything is possible. There's nothing you can't do. It's a matter of challenging your own assumptions. It's a matter of figuring out what self care you need to do to let go of fear, and it's a matter of acknowledging what you can't control. You can be completely honest with yourself. You can control how you want to show up in this work. You can control how you will respond when injustices rise their ugly heads, but I just encourage everyone to take time and do that self care to make sure that you can show up as complete and as authentic as you can in this work. Know that we cannot do it unless folks are really ready to be transparent and offer their slice of genius to this conversation. We're just not going to move as quickly, as fast, as effectively, if you're holding back and you don't lean in. That's my main thing. Challenge yourself, lean in, give yourself some grace and practice having hard conversations so that when you have to have a really hard conversation, you're ready. Nathan: I think the real work in transforming philanthropy is in those hard conversations. Our communities are desperate for solutions. We are sometimes therefore desperate for money, and some of us don't have any other choice than to be sitting across the table for the sake of our communities asking for those resources. Where you have power and privilege to be across the table moving the conversation, shifting perspective, you have power and influence. It's up to each of us to understand our responsibility and accountability, to leveraging that power and influence for the greater good. I'll say it again, this profession has power and influence, so use it. Thanks, DonorPerfect community, for having us here today. Vicky, Celia, and Vivien, you are such an inspiration to me every single day, every single day. I'm just in awe always. Shaun: Got it. From the chat, it's good that you four are rock stars. Everybody loves this. I want to thank you on behalf of DonorPerfect and everybody that joined. To the audience, thank you so much for taking time out of your busy days to come with us. We've got about 10 minutes before the next session, so please, if you got the time, check out the booths, rooms, and lounges, to gather some more information and learn some more tools that can help your organization. [silence] Speaker: [unintelligible 01:06:57]. Speaker: All is in there? Speaker: Yes. [01:07:03] [END OF AUDIO]

How to Build Community and Actually Drive Donations Using Social Media

Speakers: Julia Campbell

Description

In today’s digitally driven world, people have more messages coming at them than ever before, with multiple screens and devices being used at all-time high rates.This workshop will examine how nonprofit fundraisers need to adapt to the realities of our distracted, digital world, and how charities of all sizes can continue to attract new supporters, raise awareness for their cause, and drive donations using these tools.

Transcript

Adam Wilbur: Hello, everyone. Thank you for joining today's session. Hi, Julia. I'm Adam Wilbur. I'm one of the co-founders of CauseVid. I'd like to start by introducing the speaker for this session, Julia Campbell. Julia Campbell is named as a top thought leader by Forbes and BizTech's magazine. She's an author, speaker and nonprofit consultant on a mission to make the digital world a better place. She launched the podcast Nonprofit Nation this year, and has written two books for nonprofits on social media and storytelling. Julia's online courses, webinars and talks have helped hundreds of nonprofits make the shift to digital thinking and raise more money online. On a personal level, I'll just share how excited I am to be here today with CauseVid's partners, both Julia and DonorPerfect. When DonorPerfect reached out to us asking to be involved in the conference, we looked at the agenda and immediately saw Julia's name on there and said, "Hey, we'd like sponsor that one." I'm really excited to be here today. We at CauseVid help nonprofits incorporate video into their fundraising [unintelligible 00:01:17]. We've helped over 500 of them do so since the company was founded in 2018. I can be honest and real to say that we wouldn't have done that without help from people like Julia Campbell and DonorPerfect. Specific to DonorPerfect, we help power DonorPerfect's video feature, DP Video. If you haven't given it a try already, I'd encourage you to do so and click the button there within your DonorPerfect environment to try sending a video today, to thank your donors in a personal way with a personal video. With that, I'll turn it over to Julia and I look forward to hearing what she has to share here during her session. Thanks, Julia. Julia Campbell: Yay. Thank you. Thanks, Adam. Thank you to the team at CauseVid for always being just so supportive of me, of my work. Thank you to DonorPerfect. I'm really excited to be here today. We are going to talk about social media, which is a hot topic. I don't know if it's been in the news lately this week. [chuckles] I don't know if it's the only thing people are talking about. Since Adam read that lovely bio and he didn't say that we're actually good friends and we hung out in Florida recently at a conference, and they're just such fantastic people at CauseVid. I'll talk about them because I'm such a huge fan of video, but he did read that bio. I'm not going to go through my bio again. A couple things that you might not know about me. I am a mom of two. I've created several academies around social media. What I really want you to know is that I'm a former development and marketing director and everything director really, washing the coffee maker, driving a truck full of balloons to the event, staying up until 2:00 in the morning, making sure the brochure is correct. I've done all of that and I've been in your shoes. I know that this conference is really- you're probably a small team, a small organization. Maybe you do have a large team in large resources, but you're looking for some real actionable and practical tips that you can take away. I just wanted to share a little bit of my history before I became a consultant. What are we going to cover today? We're going to talk about the latest changes, trends in the landscape. Some statistics and some trends, and maybe a little bit of my views on what's going on with the social media landscape, as it stands this week. How to build an engaged community on social media, how to convert your fans to followers, your fans and followers into donors, that is probably the number one question that I get. I have some strategies for you and then some free and low cost tools you can use to really enhance what you're doing on a shoestring budget. Let's dive in. I always like to cite my sources, Pew Internet, Pew Research Group, a nonpartisan research group in DC. They're so fantastic. I cite a lot of their research, M+R Benchmarks, Global Trends in Giving, and eMarketer releases a social media usage report every year that is always very thorough, very, very helpful. Let's talk about Facebook. The reality is that 7 in 10 Facebook users say they visit the site daily. There are billions of people that are still using Facebook. While YouTube is technically the most used social media site, I don't consider YouTube a social media site, I consider YouTube a search engine, because we use it differently, but Pew Internet considers it a social media site. There's a growing share across demographics, maybe not younger people, but baby boomers, millennials, older generations, they are definitely using Facebook. It remains to be seen if the recent revelations brought on by the whistleblower in the congressional hearings in the last two days, if anyone cares, we don't know. I have an opinion about it. I think that we as nonprofits have a responsibility to make the digital world a better place, and our responsibility to share what we're doing and lift the veil on a lot of this bad information that might be out there. For me, I really do- I don't want to see nonprofits- like a mass exodus from these platforms, but I do want us to hold them accountable. We just can't escape that social media is a revolution in communication. It's not a to-do list, not an item on the to-do list. It's completely changed how we actually function and communicate as humans. We do need to pay attention to other social media sites other than Facebook that are growing, that are emerging and that are increasing in popularity, especially with younger generations. The big question, doesn't matter for nonprofits, I asked a question in my Facebook group of 17,000 nonprofits yesterday. I said, "Are you planning on leaving? Or are you considering leaving Facebook or Instagram because of the recent revelations?" 100% of them said, "No." What I think is happening is that we're not willing to give up these open source platforms, this fantastically really effective when you use it effectively way to reach our donors and our supporters, but we do want to use it in a really responsible and ethical way, and that's what we'll talk about today. It is effective. I think that a lot of nonprofits agree, a lot of website traffic comes from social media and the best part is that people use social media to express what they care about, to express their identities, to share things that they're passionate about. It's a perfect platform for nonprofits when used in a strategic way and used effectively. A couple of things that we're going to touch on today. We're not going to focus on Facebook fundraising, Instagram fundraising, I will touch on it. I'm not going to get it too into the weeds on it because I don't want people to put all their eggs in that basket. I do think, and I know that these platforms are too powerful to ignore. We can't just bury our head in the sand and say, "We don't want to do it. We don't want to listen to it. We don't want to know about it." We need to know about it. We need to be educated on it because then we can make a decision for our organization as to whether or not we want to use the platforms to fundraise. We might just want to use them for advocacy and awareness. Maybe we do want to use them to fundraise, you are going to have very different goals from the nonprofit that's next door to you or down the street. Another piece of information that I think is really helpful is the way that people are interacting with social media and using the platforms is changing and evolving. We originally signed onto Facebook to look up family and friends and maybe our old college roommate, that kind of thing. Now we're really using them for discovery. We're using them to find information. We're using them almost like search platforms. I know Instagram is being increasingly used as a search platform rather than connecting with friends and family. People connect with celebrities, influencers, brands, all that great stuff. Also people- we know this, so this is for better or for worse. Sometimes people can change their mind on an issue for better, sometimes they can change it for worse, it's all subjective. The point is that these platforms are highly influential, and they are embedded in a really huge percentage of at least the American population, our daily life and how we experience the news, how we experience opinions, how we experience connecting with friends, colleagues, family, things like that. We need to be paying attention to these statistics and understand that whether or not we personally like social media, our donors are on there and using it and we can shape that experience. We can only control our little corner of the internet, but we can make sure that it's a good experience and that it's an ethical and responsible experience. I do like to start off my presentations talking about what social media is, because there is a lot of myths. We were sold a bill of goods. When Mark Zuckerberg decided to create Facebook pages, we thought, "Oh, man, we could just have a billboard and just post stuff and it'd be a great way to reach our fans and followers for free," but now we know that's definitely not true. Social media is really an opportunity to reach a wider audience, a place to get real time feedback, and a chance to make connections with your community where they're spending their time, so rather than trying to grab them and pull them kicking and screaming to wherever you like to spend time, we're going to spend time with them where they spend time. It is not an ATM, this is not an ATM, a one size fits all, a magic bullet, and is not free. Now, if you are a South Park fan, you're going to know about the underpants gnomes, and that was an episode of South Park. Basically what the gnomes do is they go in houses, they steal underpants and then they have this business plan, this is their business plan, collect underpants, phase two, question mark, phase three profit. That's their great business plan. That is what a lot of our social media plans look like, we're going to get on a lot of platforms, we're going to sign up, create some accounts. We don't know what we're going to do in phase two, and then phase three, we're going to miraculously profit, so don't be like the underpants gnomes. It's not free, it actually requires a lot of strategy and creativity and time, as we do know now. It's also a value exchange, this is so important. I give you my attention and time, you give me something that I value. I don't only value coupons, I don't only value looking up leggings on Facebook, even though that's all they show me. It could be inspiration, it could be something that has meaning to me, entertainment, it could be education, information that's valuable. Value is in the eye of the beholder. Something that you think is valuable, doesn't really matter because what your donors think is valuable, is what really matters, and they're going to tell you, they tell you with likes, comments and shares, that's how they tell you what they think is valuable. Social media is not a billboard, a chance to just yell at a bunch of strangers and hope that they pay attention. Get out our promotions, that's another question that I get all the time, how can I use social media to get out our promotions? No, that's the wrong framework. That's the wrong mindset. You have to really build a community that knows and trusts you, before you can promote to them, you can't really promote to a bunch of strangers. The only way you could is if your cause is in the news, so say like the Australian bushfires, Hurricane Ida, some natural emergency that's in the news? Yes, strangers will pay attention because they've heard of it so they're not actually strangers, they've heard of it before. If you're a little local Arts Association, it's going to be a lot harder to yell at strangers and convince them to pay attention. It's also not a one way street. I've had clients that have come to me and said, "How can I turn off all the comments on social media? How can I turn off the replies, the direct message, the comments?" I said, "It sounds like you want to build a blog. It sounds like you want to build an email list, even though we know people can email you back, but it doesn't sound to me like you want to be on social media, because it's not a one way street here." A framework for you as we go into some more specifics, and some specific examples of nonprofits using social media effectively, a framework that I use is the 80/20 rule. 80% of the content that you're sharing should be interacting, building community, educating people, inspiring people, entertaining and connecting, and 20% can be promotion because you have to earn the right to promote, you have to earn that trust and attention and also, you can't just mail it in with your promotions. We're going to look at some fundraising examples. You can't just say, "Donate to our campaign," and post the link, that does not work. You still have to put a little bit of effort into your promotions and make them interesting and relevant. I think social media is perfect for nonprofits, because we can shed light on all of the complex and difficult issues we talk about, we can advocate for our work and our impact, we can address myths and misconceptions around the populations that we serve. We can educate, we can enlighten, we can fill knowledge gaps, which is hugely important, and we can use it to really keep people inspired by and active in our work. I really want us to change the world we live in for the better, and we try to do it every day so let's do it on digital channels, and that's the hashtag, take back digital, we're going to take it back for good. I also think we have a moral obligation, I really do. We can't hide our work away in a little ivory tower and not tell people, because this is what a lot of people think, homeless people want to live in the street, the arts are nice, but not necessary. I don't want to say a lot of people, some people. Some kids are just bad kids, the poor will always be with us, that kind of thing. We need to really shine a spotlight on the problems that we're solving. We need to also play the long game, we need to elevate human connection and focus on transparency and these are all benefits so if you're looking to convince a board member, or convince an executive director about social media, you should be talking about these bigger picture things rather than just oh, we're going to raise money on it. The key here is like anything else, the know, like and trust factor, that is huge. We're going to look at some examples of how you can build this factor, all three factors, within your audience, because you want to build a community that would follow you anywhere. You want these tools to be a moot point, you want to be like, if I need to get off Twitter, then they'll follow me somewhere else or- not everyone's going to, but a huge chunk of people should be willing to follow you. Another important thing that I want to say is, it's just not something that you can check off your to do list, it's a very hungry beast. I think what you're asking, okay, this is all really great, Julia, but how can I build a social media marketing program, with very limited time and with multiple responsibilities on my plate? You know what I love about this picture? You just Google like working mom, and you find these awful stock photos. I just wanted to highlight this because I don't usually use horrible stock photos like this, but be careful of the stock photos you use. This is just the worst stock photo, but I think it conveys a point at least. You don't have to be everywhere. I'm going to show you a framework that you can use to evaluate where you need to be in the first place. You shouldn't be everywhere. You can't be everywhere. It's not possible. Should we be on there? Say you're asking, okay, should we be on TikTok? Is your target audience on the platform? First of all, you need to know your goal and your target audience. Can you add value on this platform, or just more noise and clutter? Can you actually contribute something helpful to your audience? This is very important, because you can re-purpose, so if you have a great story, if you have a great photo, you can share it across multiple platforms but you cannot simply cut and paste and spray it out and use Hootsuite or one of those platforms to just put the same exact thing on all the platforms, because they all have different character counts, and some can use hashtags and some can use tagging and that kind of thing. Can you consistently create and share content that's designed for this specific platform? I just actually want to go over this one more time. These are the questions that you're going to bring to your board when your board chair says, "We really need to be on Snapchat," you're going to say, "Okay, I will evaluate that. I also will take something else off my plate, what would you like me to take off my plate so that I can put that on my plate?" If we've decided that we can answer yes to all these three questions, then perhaps it's a great place to go, like Clubhouse, it's like anything else. It's like, let's start a podcast. Let's start a blog. You have to ask these core questions because first of all, it's not free, your time is not free, and adding something else onto your time is not free at all. What are the strategies that we can use to actually drive donations, to convert social media fans and followers into actually taking an action for us? Number one, and I'm actually pleased-- Well, I'm not pleased with what happened this week, but it proves my point, the great Facebook and Instagram outage of 2021, and then the congressional testimony from the Facebook whistleblower on how toxic Facebook and Instagram can be to youth, to teens, to our mental health. What we want to do, and I've said this before, I've been saying this for years because we do not own the platforms. They could go down at any time, they could start charging. They could do some crazy algorithm change that we don't know about, and they do very frequently. We don't own those platforms. If you have a permission-based email list where people sign up and opt into your email list, you can carry that wherever you go, you can bring it to DonorPerfect. You can bring it into [unintelligible 00:20:55] contact. You can do whatever you want with it. Really, if it's permission-based, I'm not saying harvest emails from LinkedIn or by email lists. If it's permission-based, you can do that. We also have to think about the power of email versus social media. It's the first thing people check in the morning, email's the first thing usually before social, and people prefer to receive this promotional marketing content through email. Email open rates, 16%, they start up. I hope that yours is higher, but Facebook reaches just 2% to 6% of a page fan. If we're thinking about reach and engagement, we do want to create this more intimate relationship with our audience by bringing them over to email. Why email? Then I'm going to show you really how to do that, but I just think building this deeper relationship with people, that should constantly be the focus of your social media marketing plan, not every post, certainly not every post but certainly it should be one of the primary drivers of your social media plan. The key here is not to just say, "Sign up for our newsletter." Excuse me. NASA said, "Our next newsletter is coming out soon, sign up for a condensed review." I would have changed the title here to get updates on climate change or something, make it something compelling. Nobody really wants to click on sign up for newsletter, right? No, sign up today, we'll send you two simple ways to fight hunger in your community. Join us in the fight against deforestation. Never miss an update in our mission to cure childhood cancer, right? Don't miss our stories. You do have to give people a compelling reason to sign up. That is the key here. It can't just be signed up for a newsletter. Do play on FOMO. This is a tip I got from Sandy Rees of Get Fully Funded. That is one of my favorite fundraising blogs. Sandy Rees, Get Fully Funded. When she was talking about how her tips on getting people from social media to the email list, she said, "Play on FOMO." "Tomorrow we'll be sharing Molly's story and her incredible journey in our newsletter. If you want to read it, sign up for our updates here," and then post the link to sign up. That is really enticing and interesting, and make sure that its content that you're only featuring in your email newsletter as well. Add your email sign up to all of your social media bios and give people a reason to sign up. I love this, subscribe to our monthly email, Herd Around the Barn, to keep up with the excitement. Really enticing people to make that deeper connection, add an email, sign up to all of your videos. In all of your video captions and live stream broadcast, you can add them in the caption like New York Public Library does. You could add in the comments, you could add them inside the caption, but you don't have to do this for all videos. Just where it makes sense. You might have a fundraising appeal on some videos and then other videos, you might have an email sign up, but these are all places where you can ask people for their email address and try to build your email list, get them from social media to your email list. If you're on YouTube and if you have any video content at all, you should be on YouTube. It is the number two search engine in the world owned by the number one search engine, Google. You should be on there. This is just such a great place to build your email list. You can add a card, you can just add it in the caption of your YouTube video, if you want, because you can add hyperlinks in your YouTube captions, or you can actually add a card overlay to your YouTube video, asking people to sign up. Also, of course, pop-ups on your website, but also what I wanted to highlight here, I wanted to highlight the wording, be the first to know, get exclusive updates on the conflict and what we're doing to stop it straight to your inbox. Join us, stay connected to the global movement to end poverty and low expectations. Today we can give every woman in India hope and the opportunity to create her own future. It's just very, very compelling call to action, much more than, sign up for our email newsletter. Right? Okay. That is building your email list. Make sure you are strategically using these channels to actively get people over to your email list, where then you can build a deeper relationship with them. All right. Step two, strategy two, leverage the power of targeted social ads. Social media is really pay to play at this point. You can of course use all of the strategies in part one that we talked about and not pay to boost them, but I would actually pay a little bit of money to boost them, to get them in front of even more of your fans. The way that you do that, don't send people to the homepage of your website and expect them to figure out what to do. You want to- not necessarily boost your post. You want to create a separate ad in Facebook Ads Manager, because boosting a post just really sends it to the lowest hanging- not the lowest hanging fruit. It really just sends it out to a broad audience. You don't get as many metrics on it and you can't really control what happens to it in the budget and the timing as much as you can, if you create a stand-alone ad in Ads Manager. Anytime you have a campaign, you need to be running ads on Facebook and Instagram. If your audience is on there. If your audience is on there, I should say. Don't run ads if your audience is not on Facebook and Instagram because that would be silly, but the majority of the world is on either one of those platforms. I would say maybe some of your audience is on there, but it's definitely worth boosting. Now you want to do something you can track, so you want to do something where you can say, "Okay, we spent $50 and we got 150 email signups," and then even better, know what an email sign up is worth to you, or you can say, "We spent $50 and we got $300 in donations." That would be incredible by the way. That'd be amazing. That'd be amazing conversion rate, but it has to be something that's trackable. I don't like paying money for reach, unless you're going to retarget those people later and that's another whole topic, but I don't like just having people look at my stuff, because looking is fine. They could be scrolling through, they technically looked at it, but they didn't really care about it or click on it or pay any attention to it. You want to measure for clicks or video views or sign ups or something tangible that you can measure, because then you're going to be able to measure the return on investment that you spent. What I want you to do when you're not actively fundraising, have things to offer that people can click on, like a new report, a special story, a video, a free event, a webinar, a Facebook live, have things where they can join you off social media, give them some incentive. Then remember for your long-term plan. I want you to focus on warm audiences, trying to reach brand new cold audiences who've never heard of you. If you've never run Facebook ads before, that's going to be very difficult. Talk to your warm audiences, your fans, your followers, your email lists, talk to people that [unintelligible 00:29:07] like you, your video views. You can send ads to the people that have watched your videos on Facebook, to the people that have watched your Facebook lives. I know in the works right now, you're going to be able to retarget ads to anyone that's made a donation to you on Facebook, and that's huge. That is definitely coming down the pipeline, which is going to be amazing. When you're being strategic about targeting, there are three ways you can do it. Create a custom audience from a list of donors or volunteers or stakeholders. Everyone that gave to you on GivingTuesday last year, you definitely want to target an ad to them this year. Everyone who gifts you Mother's Day campaign last year, target an ad to them this year as well. You can pull up this list in Facebook, target an ad to really whoever you want, as long as you have an email list, if you have the pixel, Facebook pixel on your website, you can create an ad and send it to people that have visited your website. People that visited your donate page, people that visited your email signup page, people that just visited your homepage, you can really target it however you want. There is a way- I'm not going to get too technical here, that you can actually prevent ads from being shown to people who've already donated. It's pretty technical, little bit in the weeds for people, but there is a way to do it. If you're worried about offending your donors, there definitely is a way to do that, but I wouldn't let that hinder you from targeting ads to other donors that haven't given yet. Then this is really where the power lies, right? This is where the power lies for us to really reach new audiences. This is Facebook and Instagram, but it applies to any social media site that you run on ads on. Once they get enough information-- If you've run ads for a while, they start to see, oh, this is the kind of person that clicks on this ad. This is their demographics, their behaviors, their interests, their age, their location. They start to get that kind of information and then they can target brand new people who look like your [inaudible 00:31:25] list. This is the power. It's certainly a long-term strategy. It's not a silver bullet. It takes a long time to really effectively build this kind of audience but I think for all of our purposes, if we're going to be leveraging the power of these platforms, we need to lever the power of the platforms. This is the power, the social graph and the ability to target ads to specific people. That was a little technical. You can just Google how to create a custom audience. It's actually very easy. You upload a list- or what I recommend. I'm not kidding you. I do recommend. I don't offer this service, but hiring a freelancer to do your Facebook ads or your Google ads, because it's a science. I've hired people to do ads for me and it was well worth it, let me tell you, because it's time consuming, but it's definitely a long-term strategy that ends up paying off if you do it correctly. This one doesn't really require any money unless you want to pay for ads. This could be a free strategy. Promote your campaigns, tell people that you're raising money. You don't have to use the donate button. You could send people offsite, feeding America raises millions and millions of dollars, sending people offsite. Macmillan Cancer Support, they raised million of dollars with their text to give campaign. They don't use a donate button, text dad to 70, I can't even read that, 70550. There are other ways to use social media to promote your fundraising message without using those internal tools. Also let people know that monthly giving is an option, please. You don't know that people know that. Tell people about your monthly donors, your recurring options. Tell people that you rely on these donations to sustain you. You can't assume that people know, you really can't. The most compelling fundraising on social media tells a story, grabs my attention with a visual, has an emotional component to it, kind of a hook and then specifically tells me what to do next. It tells me what to do next. It's easy to make a gift today by clicking the donate button below. Can you give just $5 to help Fiesta and other animals like her? Specific, specific, specific, feed a family for the holidays. Your $20 gift provides a complete holiday meal for a family of five. This works because you have to think about how people use social media, they're at their kid's soccer game. Maybe, that might be me, or they are on the go. They've got two minutes. They're waiting in line at the grocery store and you've got to tell them what to do and we also have so much decision fatigue. I know that I have decision fatigue by the end of the day. I don't want to make a decision, tell me, $20. Okay, great. $5, awesome and just make it as easy as possible for them to follow the directions. Now I'm going to talk just really briefly about the tools available on Instagram and Facebook. YouTube has a donate button, but it's only available to select nonprofits. You have to have 10,000 subscribers. You have to jump through all these hoops. I didn't actually cover YouTube here. Twitter does not. LinkedIn does not. TikTok only has a donate button for very select. They hand-select the nonprofits, that kind of thing. Instagram, you can put the donate button on your profile. People can go to your profile and click the donate button and make a donation in two taps. You can put the donation sticker on your Instagram stories or people can raise money for you on their Instagram stories. The way to do that is you do have to sign up for Facebook charitable giving tools. You do have to sign up for Facebook fundraising tools in order to access those Instagram tools. The best calls to action. These are the best calls to action on social media. Make your give now language compelling. That's really the best thing that you could possibly do. Join our movement. Join us now, save the summer for kids. Don't just say, "Donate to support our campaign," because helping you reach your goal for your campaign is not the reason I give to you, and also GivingTuesday, that's not the reason I give to you. I might be looking to give that day, but it's not the reason I give to you. I give to you because I want to solve a problem and you have a solution that I care about. Emphasize that, always consider your audience, play on their motivations and their desires, like what kind of world do they want to see and how can you fit into that? And they want to create a meaningful life too. How can your mission fit into that? What problem do they want to solve? Hugely, hugely important when you're writing a call to action. Also, I want you to have fun. I want you to have fun because do we remember when social media was fun? I don't know if we do, especially right now, but I think it used to be fun. Even in COVID, curator battle, creepiest objects. I saw museums, aquariums. I saw so many historical societies just having fun on social media, sharing gratitude, talking to your staff, talking to your volunteers, just simply sharing what you're thankful for, especially right now, what your wish being thankful, gratitude. What you're thinking of for the New Year. What are your plans? Maybe you're just taking some time off. Things like giving people helpful information, eight tips for a perfect hike with kids. I saw something from an environmental organization, seven climate justice podcasts to listen to. I thought that was so helpful. I was like, "That's really cool." That's such a cool idea for something that you don't even have to create. You just find your best podcast and share that with people and that's what's going to keep people following you and that's what's going to increase that no like, and trust factor, because they know that you're providing helpful and useful and relevant information to them. They're much more likely to keep following you. Share the love from one platform to the next. Kiva does this all the time. In their Instagram stories, they share how they got tagged- on the stories they got tagged on Twitter, on Twitter they share their best Instagram stories, repurpose, reuse content, and share and share even more, and then make sure if people are writing you these thank you notes, writing you these testimonials, sending these amazing stories your way, that you have a way to curate them and to collect them and to keep them so that you can share them across all the platforms. This post I absolutely love because I want to encourage you to actually ask for engagement, especially when you're not fundraising because as we know all too well, the algorithm rewards engagement, it rewards comments, likes, and shares. What Amirah does, and they actually do it in a very genuine, authentic way and they've been doing it for years. It doesn't really look like, oh, tag a friend, or, tag a friend who needs to hear this today. If I see that one more time on Instagram, I will scream, but what they're saying is, leave a note for Joanna below and we will share it with her, name change for privacy and security. They do this a lot. They say a woman has celebrated five years sober. A woman has just gotten her college degree. A woman was reunited with her son, something like that. They'd share these great mission moments and celebratory moments and they invite their fans and followers to celebrate with them and they get a lot of comments and a lot of shares. I always comment. I'm always like, "You go, Joana. You're so awesome. You're so great," because it makes me-- I'm assuming they read them. I know this organization they're super authentic and wonderful people, but it makes me feel good. It does. It just makes me feel good. It makes me feel like, "You know what, there is a little piece of social media that's good. I can leave a helpful note for someone, and I can make somebody's day." It's helping me and it's helping the organization as well. All right, in the last five minutes or so before questions, and Adam is generously going to read out the questions to me after I go through the tools, I just want to share some of my favorite ways that you can increase engagement on social media. While I do want to give a shout-out to CauseVid, CauseVid is amazing for increasing donor retention, reaching your donors, and sharing videos all over the internet. For video editing, I really like Animoto. This is another one that you can use really easily on your app. You can use the app, you can use the desktop. It's pretty cheap. I know they have a nonprofit rate. Usually, what I do is I just Google Animoto nonprofit rate, and then you can find the nonprofit rate. I think you have to apply, but it's fine. This one you can pull in photos from your computer and create a little montage. You don't even have to have video content. I also really like Lumen5 because you can take a listicle like the top eight hiking tips for kids, whatever that one was, and they will make a video for you. It's all, of course, a lot of stock photography, a lot of stock video if you want to add to it and personalize it. I'm just thinking of what's going to save you time, what can you drag and drop just to make some kind of visual moving element for your social media because the very first step is to grab attention. If you can't actually stop the scroll and grab someone's attention, then you won't ever have the opportunity of making that deeper connection with them in terms of your mission and explaining what you do. Six videos you can make today, tell me how to do something really, really quick. Give me a behind-the-scenes look even if you're just in your home office. Give me a testimonial in your words. Explain a new story. This is what's happening in the news today. This is the latest on breast cancer research, this is what's happening. Tease a blog post. Tease an event. Share how you were founded and why you're unique in what you do. You could easily make all of those videos today with your phone. If you want to get fancy, you could use Canvas video editor or Animoto, whatever you want. You can make those videos with your phone, and you could share them out, and I know that your audience would love it. Not many people share video, and that's why you're going to be standing out. Graphic design, we all know Canva. I made this with Canva in like 30 seconds, this little graphic. Word Swag is another one I love. Adobe Spark for those Adobe people. Canva has really changed the game I think for everyone in terms of just making it very easy to create graphics. Just try to spice it up a little bit with your own either logo, or colors, or fonts to make it look personally yours. For scheduling and management, I like Buffer. I use scheduling pretty sparingly. I really use it just for Twitter, sometimes for LinkedIn. I know Facebook and Instagram their algorithms don't like outside scheduling tools, so you might not show up as much. That's just my personal experience. Later is great for Instagram. Storrito is great for stories, Instagram Stories. If you feel constantly challenged to keep up with Instagram Stories, you could just schedule a whole week inside Storrito. Digitile is a phenomenal-- I don't know if it's an app or a software, you can organize all your files across Dropbox, Google Drive, Sonar, 10,000 different places. It's really helpful one-stop place for all your digital files. Of course, we need to take some time for ourselves. We need to make sure that we're looking after our own mental wellness and our own tech work-life balance. Inbox Pause, If you're like me, your inbox is basically your to-do list, but you don't like to constantly have the influx of emails, the tidal wave that keeps crashing on you. You can work inside your inbox but pause the new emails. Boomerang is basically sending an email off into the abyss and having it come back at a set time, which I love. Momentum, Headspace, and Brain.fm, those are all apps for meditation, for wellness, for relaxation, for detox, and they're really, really helpful. I think that's so important, especially if we are social media managers that we do take some time to detox and to really figure out our priorities and our goals, and our strategies to become more intentional. All right, what tool are you most excited to try out? If you can put it in the general chat where I will see it. Which tool? Which tool do you love that you generally use? I hope you're excited to find a new tool, something that you haven't used before. I'm sure most of you have used Canva. Yes, just throw out whatever tool you like. If I didn't mention a tool and you happen to really like it, just put it in the chat. Let me see, a few things, oh, I love Inbox Pause, Animoto. A few things that I want to leave you with, some thoughts, trends come and go. We know this. Look at this. [chuckles] Look at that graphic. How to futureproof your strategy, meet your donors where they are, not where you want them to be. Make every interaction frictionless, so that means I don't need to do 20 steps to complete it and clear as possible. Think about your donors first. It's not about you and your agenda. It's about your donors. Please don't get overwhelmed. The only constant in online marketing is that it's constantly changing. Platforms come and go. Focus on building a real community that will follow you no matter where you set up shop. Awesome. Let's go to some questions. Adam, what do we have? We've got about 13 minutes left for questions, so that's really good. Adam: Thanks so much. A lot of complimentary messages here, too, from people who really enjoyed everything you've shared so far. One of the first questions that came in was, and you spoke to it a little bit, was around when fundraising on Facebook whether to use those native tools that Facebook provides or to point people to a GoFundMe page or your own donation page. I'm wanting to know if you know of any data that might show and compare how effective it is to use Facebook's Medium fundraising tool versus sending people over to another platform or forum. Julia: I don't think any nonprofit has done a study. I have done some informal studies with my clients for sure. It just comes down to preference because I do think you need both because there are some people that aren't on Facebook. If you are running a fundraising campaign only on Facebook, you're excluding a huge percentage of your audience that can't participate. However, think about the user on Facebook. I'm on Facebook, I'm on the app, I'm scrolling through, I see, "Oh, my friend, Melissa, is raising money for St. Jude's, but it's a link." This is me, this is a lot of people, I'm like I click on a link, got to go to a donate page, go to the donate page, I have to pinch and scroll, I have to enter all my information, I have to find my purse, which is never easy. [laughter] Julia: Enter my credit card information, and then do all of that without my children burning down the house. That's just for me, I prefer when I'm on Facebook, I prefer the donate button because it is two taps. It's easier to do. It's a preference. I would test it out, and I would use both. Obviously, if you're doing a huge fundraising campaign, you need the page, you need the donor page on your website because what are you going to-- From Twitter, from everywhere else, from LinkedIn, from if you're on YouTube, if you're on email, you need that other page, but those posts don't do as well as the donate button. The other thing that's-- It's just so important for us to know, Facebook wants people to stay on the platform, they don't want people to click off. If you're running a fundraising campaign using the donate button, more of your fans and followers are going to see it. Rather than if you're running a campaign where people have to click off. We have to fully embrace, either we have to reject or embrace the nefariousness of these platforms. They are businesses, they want us to stand. That's why by the way, Facebook created the donate button. They saw how many nonprofits were using Facebook to fundraise, but sending people off of Facebook. They said, "Oh, we want them to fundraise, but we don't want them sending their donors on Facebook, so we're going to create something so they stay on Facebook." The same with Instagram. It's just a preference. I don't think one is better than the other. I absolutely don't think you should put your eggs all in the Facebook basket. Because what if you were running a campaign this week. I think of the people that were running their fundraising campaign this week, and Facebook was down for a whole day. You just can't put all your eggs in that basket. It's a useful tool, but don't rely on it. Adam: It's a great point. Next question and this is what I know, I've heard you speak on before, when you have multiple varied audiences, such as students, parents, and donors, should you target each one by platform? Should you focus content aimed at one audience for social media, and vary how you present that information based on platform in the age of the people who are likely on that platform? Julia: First of all, it does depend on your bandwidth. If you have a lot of bandwidth, a huge department, if you're a university, then it might make sense to have an alumni page dedicated to alumni but you've got to think about donors, donors don't see themselves as donors, they would never say I'm a donor. They're like, "Oh, I'm this, I'm an alumni." I'm just thinking of my dad, who I was talking to last night, he went to Colgate and his relationship with Colgate, he would never say he's a donor. He's an alumnus. That's how he identifies. Your donors are spread across all these groups and there's not going to be any one way you can grab, you can't really say, "Oh, this is a donor," because donors come from all sorts of different groups. It really depends on what the audience wants, like, do the students want a separate page or not? Do the students want something on Instagram? Is this something that people want, because what happens is, we tend to create things in our mind because we think people want them and we're creating a solution where there wasn't a problem. If parents are like, we want to connect with each other, in a private platform, great, private Facebook group. If students say, "Oh, we really want a platform to showcase our artwork or our music," then maybe Instagram. You have to look at the goal of the platform and also who's going to be using it and what the purpose is. If you don't have the bandwidth to create a lot of different things, think about the thread that runs through all of them. Think about the problem you're solving that parents care about, students care about, and donors care about and community members care about. What is that thread that runs through everything that can tie all of your content together? Adam: Now. Next question. You talked about using ads when targeting a warm audience only, someone asked you in several people going to upload it how do you recommend people increase their followers in the first place, especially when they're a newer organization, just building its social media presence? Julia: Oh, well, if you're just starting out, it's going to be really hard. The ads that you run, the more reach you get with your warm audience, the more that their friends, their family, other people will be introduced to you. You want to start out preaching to the choir and what you want to do is get the choir really excited, so that they start singing your praises to everybody else. Because purchasing fans and followers or setting up ads and trying to get people to like you and follow you especially in 2021, 2022 that just doesn't work anymore. I guarantee you that not everybody on your email list follows you. Not all your donors follow you. Not all your board members follow you, your volunteers, your staff. Start with the low-hanging fruit, grow your audience with them, and then the real key, Seth Godin talks about this all the time, my favorite marketing author, he says in order to be remarkable, you have to be remarked upon. You have to do something that's worth remarking on. You have to do something that's going to get them excited and get them to share out but focus on that low-hanging fruit first, get them all fired up, and then get them to spread the word for you. Adam: Here's another question about video. I'll ask that one. [laughs] I have an answer to this one to some extent, but I'll have you comment on the social media side of it. Someone's asking about the recommended length for videos specific to Facebook and Instagram, I can share data just that shows that [inaudible 00:55:30] in 10-second mark is where you see this massive drop off in people viewing a video but do you have any specific comments on video length when posting on social media, specifically Facebook or Instagram? Julia: Well, is it a Facebook Live? If it's a live video that's a very different question because live video should be between maybe 7 and 15 minutes in order to grow a following growing audience. If it's an on-demand video, yes, it should probably be 30 seconds or less in order to-- If you want people to get a lot of views, if it's really just to grab attention and stop the scroll, you could do five seconds animated GIF, could be enough to grab people's attention and get them to read the caption. I know on Instagram, you can't do more than a minute, but in my experience, actually, I really like the animated GIFs unless you need someone speaking and in that case, I would say 30 seconds probably no more than a minute and like you said, Adam, there's a huge drop off every 10 seconds of a video. Adam: I want to share in the chat I just tried to link to a video that I'm doing a perfect client of ours sent. Julia: Cool. Adam: Where they created a pretty simple video showing impact about 45 seconds long they sent it to all their laps to donors, and that 45-second video raised over $4,400 directly. Julia: Nice. Adam: One simple 45-second video and this particular case, I think what we learned from that is that you have a group of lapsed donors you might be touching via different channels, but for some reason, the video is what prompted them to renew their support, whereas other touches didn't necessarily or hadn't done that in the recent attempt. Julia: We were just talking about this before I started, I have a client I'm trying to convince them to use video in their email appeal this year because they are a rare disease organization. It's a little bit of a complicated heavy topic and I thought having a video from the founder even if it's 30 seconds is going to lighten up, it's just automatically going to lighten it up but also it's just making it more compelling. You can put in the subject line I made you a video and that's going to get your open rates up and that's going to get a lot of engagement. It's something that I don't see a lot of nonprofits doing and because I think they think that it needs to be perfect. I think they they are like, "Oh no, we needed to be $10,000 and produced and perfect." It really doesn't have to be impactful. Adam: Now even you mentioned editing tools and we're talking about Animoto, I'm always impressed with the extent to which I can edit a video on my iPhone. I can record that video, I can crop it, I can trim it. I can create a video pretty quickly, I did one of my son's literally this past week. Julia: Oh, nice. Adam: Really quick. Take a 30-second video [crosstalk] Julia: You can absolutely do that. Oh, they're so many tools on our phones now. Adam: Oh, yes. Next question here. When it comes to giving programs like a monthly giving program, how critical do you think it is to specifically brand that program for the organization? I know, for example, something like Charity Water has the spring which is their monthly giving program should these organizations be trying to brand their monthly giving program in a certain way to capture people's attention and connect it with something? Julia: I know two experts that you should follow. Just First I want to give them both a shout out Erica [unintelligible 00:59:08] She is, oh, man I don't know her website. Erica [unintelligible 00:59:14] I'll put her name in the chat. Lynn Westar donor guru, she talks a lot about this. To me, I think creating a special group of people and giving them something that they can say, "I am this," that's always going to increase conversion rates. Like I am this, I am a champion. I am an advocate, giving them a bumper sticker, stickers for their hydro flask, or their notebook. Anytime you can create that kind of identity and community it will work. I don't think it's going to make or break your monthly giving program. I think having a compelling reason to give monthly and stories and that kind of thing but branding, it certainly can help if you've got a fun name, and then you can announce it and you can send out shirts and do all sorts of fun stuff with that. Adam: I see Eleanor back joining us. Looking at the clock looks like we're ready to close it up. Eleanor: Yes. Thank you, Julia and Adam. That was amazing. Such a great session. I hope everybody had some takeaways. We have a 15-minute break where everybody can head over to the rooms and lounges. Our last and final sessions will start at three o'clock. Giving Tuesday and Donor Search, both two great sessions, engaging. Make sure you guys hit the booths and the lounges now, and the rooms, and then check back in at three 3 o'clock. Thanks again, Julia and Adam. Great work. Adam: Thank you. [unintelligible 01:00:48]. Julia: Bye. Thank you. Eleanor: Take care. [pause 01:00:50] Eleanor: Hit add to stream, Adam. There you go. [01:01:25] [END OF AUDIO]

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Ways to Strengthen Your Donor Relationships Through Your Website & Email Strategy

For many of your donors, your nonprofit’s digital presence is how they meet you, get to know you, and decide what kind of relationship they want to have with your organization.

Ways to Strengthen Your Donor Relationships Through Your Website & Email Strategy

Description

For many of your donors, your nonprofit’s digital presence is how they meet you, get to know you, and decide what kind of relationship they want to have with your organization. With years of experience helping nonprofits shine online at Constant Contact, Matthew Montoya will provide insights and actionable takeaways to help you craft community-building experiences through your email marketing strategies by reimagining the very assets you lean on today. Remember every email contact you have gained represents a former or potential donor. Leveraging best practices can help you access their intentions to strengthen relationships and grow donations.

Transcript

Lori: Good afternoon, and welcome to our next session. Which is Ways to Strengthen Your Donor Relationships Through Your Website and Email Strategy. Our speaker is Matthew Montoya. Matthew is the Channel Marketing and Enablement Manager at Constant Contact. He has spent a decade helping thousands of nonprofits across the country, understand how digital marketing can improve their growth. He understands their pain points. Before joining Constant Contact, he wore multiple hats at a small nonprofit with just a two person staff. Just to let you all know, Matthew is going to be giving you some great information. I will be posting a link or two in the chat for you, you will be able to access the slides in the Resource Center. I want to make sure that when you put your questions out there that they don't go into the chat, that they go into the Q&A so that we make sure that we answer those. Matt, it's all yours. Matthew Montoya: Thank you very much, Lori. Hello, everybody. Just a little bit about me, I have-- if you've not met me I've met so many of you, I have spoken at many DonorPerfect conferences and events. If you haven't met me, I'm Matthew Montoya. I did before my 10 years of Constant Contact work a 5013C, and I did wear multiple hats. Email marketing was just one responsibility to bookkeeping, and answer the phones. I know what your life is like or at least I have a good feeling for it. I'm really passionate about nonprofits. I would dare say, this may be the most important presentation I've ever delivered to DonorPerfect audiences. Well, let's go ahead and just go through the agenda. We're going to talk a little bit-- let me actually pause. I've spoken at so many DonorPerfect conferences, there will be some content that if you've seen me before, you're going to see again, but there is a purpose for that because there is something in the middle of this presentation you're definitely going to want to zero in on. I have to talk about best practices, because maybe you never got to see me present. This will be important information about best practices and why you should utilize email marketing if you're not already, but as you see, one of these bullets is in bold and that's actually going to be the cornerstone of my presentation. If this is all about building relationships, there is a bit of an obstacle in building relationships. We need to make sure that you're aware of this obstacle, and that you're planning your email marketing around it. We're going to be talking about some basics, why email marketing? We're going to go through some best practices that are now more important than ever. We're talking now as in as of two weeks ago, it's more important than ever. Then we're going to go lean into click reporting and why that's the key, the cornerstone in building a relationship with your audiences. Then we'll get to the big one, changes to open reporting. We'll talk about some relationship-building tactics, and please submit your questions through the question window, not the chat window, but through the question window throughout. Then Lori is going to ask some of those questions to me in the Q&A. Let's go ahead and get underway. Why email marketing? I'm going to go on a limb, of the for profit and nonprofit world, nonprofits are the ones I don't really have to convince to do email marketing, but let's just talk a little bit about the basics, and there's a theory behind me sharing this stuff with you. Again, it comes down to that bullet in the middle of the presentation. Email marketing delivers three times the conversion rate of social media and I don't mean to throw social media under the bus, it's a very powerful tool, but the ROI in email marketing is stronger. For every dollar you spend, you see about $44 in return. That's pretty hard to beat and not to go too recent in the news, but some things happened on social media yesterday that certainly highlights some of the power of email marketing versus social media. Email marketing also is a fantastic way and I'm again, I'm assuming you're using email marketing to get donations. It's a fantastic way to get donations, 38% of online donors are inspired to give via an email so that's great. Email marketing works, people like to donate via email marketing, but one thing I want to do is think about if we're talking about relationships, I want you to think about the correlation between relationships and the fact that somebody gave you their email address in the first place. One thing I always have audiences think about is the value of each email address you have. You can calculate it. Now this is not scientific, but if you multiply the average donation you receive by the size of your list, you're going to have some idea of the value of your list. Now, not everyone is going to donate, not everyone's going to attend, not everyone's going to take action. In fact, you can expect about 3% of any given email is going to convert for you on average, but the reality is I want you to really realize how precious those email addresses are because if somebody gives you the email address, if this whole presentation is about relationship building, then that's the first step in the relationship. They trust you and your organization enough to give you their information. That's a fantastic way to look at these contacts because the relationship is already started. Now perhaps you've gotten that email address in correlation of getting a donation. Perhaps you've gotten that email address from an events attendee, that's still the first step in the relationship. For people that have not donated yet or have not taken action with your organization, that relationship is beginning as well and it's a matter of understanding how important that contact is to your organization and making sure you utilize best practices to leverage that new relationship. How can they donate? How can they attend? How can they take action? How can they volunteer if they don't look at your email in the first place? I want to go over some best practices. Again, for some of you, this may not be new, maybe you've seen me talk about this before. If you've never seen me or you've never watched training from Constant Contact, this might be new, but I have to go through it because of the changes in the way that email opens are reported now. The first best practice is to always use images, images are extremely great way to get complex information across. If you think about it, if an image speaks 1,000 words, well, you're saving some space in your email with an image. Images also have a very high click through rate. Let me define click through rate in case you're new to email marketing. Click through rate is simply how many people click on something in your email, and images are a fantastic way to gain that click because it's so big, especially on a mobile device. If you think about the time that you're on a website, if you want to navigate maybe back to the homepage, instinctively, you click on the logo. Same thing in an email, you always want to link those images. One thing I see some nonprofits do is miss at that point, they put in a link like a button or hyperlink but they don't think to link their images and they may be not getting as much engagement as possible. Now, you obviously want to link the image to the same destination, to the article, the donation link, whatever you're trying to drive people to. You want to link the image to the same place. You want to keep your images limited, no more than about three. Now that doesn't include your logo. The reason you don't want to have any more than three is that if you include more than three, your email may start being too long and too complex and you might be overwhelming people. Images are so powerful because they receive 650% higher on average, engagement rates than when you don't use an image. As I've said, this engagement, this is going to be the critical piece of this presentation, getting that engagement to build your relationships and leverage those relationships. Now a couple of notes around working with photos, choose the right size. What do I mean by that? Don't let the image overwhelm the email. You want to think about something called a scroll line. You want to think about how much of your content is appearing before somebody has to scroll and that is becoming more and more critical because we need to make sure we have people zero in on what we're asking them to do, whether that's sharing news, sharing a donation link, whatever, we need to make sure that they see that as immediately as possible. Obviously, avoid copyright issues, don't go to Google and download an image if you don't own it. Best case scenario, use your own photos. Those are really powerful and speak volumes for your organization. Obviously, use discretion if you're working with children or something like that. Use stock images. If you are a Constant Contact customer, Constant Contact has a stock image gallery right where you put in images in the Constant Contact. It is a fantastic resource and many of those images are free. Lastly, Constant Contact, if you are a Constant Contact customer, recently launched a integration with Canva. Canva is an amazing tool to alter images and create campaigns, and now you can synchronize Canva with Constant Contact to push campaigns from Canva to Constant Contact. My next tip is to be consistent in your colors. Color represents brand by 80%, much more than your logo, and so you want to be really consistent not just in your email marketing, but across all your marketing. This is kind of marketing basics, but you want to make sure that they're consistent across every platform that you market on. You want to make sure that the color represents brand and you want to make sure that you're consistent with it. You want to make sure that if a holiday comes up or you're doing something special, you don't alter that color scheme because what we want to do is when somebody opens the email, we want to establish the brand. We want to establish the feelings they have for you as immediately as possible and then have them dig into content. Now the next tip is make it personal. In fact, this is actually the second core conceit of this entire presentation. Now I'm talking about a couple of things around personalization. First, is literally having somebody's name or other pertinent information actually appear in the email. You can also have the subject line, you can have the person's name or other contact information show up in the subject line as well. It's a fantastic way to engage your audience because you're making the content live. It's drawing their eye to the content. Somebody sees your name, they're going to pay a little more attention to it, and it's connecting their heart, their brain to your organization. The second piece of personalization is actually literally making the content as personal as you can to the reader. That's really going to be dovetailing into a concept I'm going to talk about in just a moment around segmentation and how important segmentation is. Now why should we pay attention to personalization? Well, because you see about 11% higher opens and 27% higher click through rates when you personalize your content. Now, again, personalizing content isn't just putting in somebody's name or other pertinent information, you need to make that content as personalized as possible. My next tip is to use buttons. Now buttons, you can see a couple of buttons in this email example. Buttons are really powerful for a couple of reasons. One, if you give people a button to push in an email, they inherently know that they're supposed to push the button in the email. Secondly, they're really easy to click on, particularly on a smartphone. If somebody opens up an email on a smartphone, that button is going to be very easy for them to click, much like I just talked about with images. There are an obvious call to action and here's a piece about images, while images are really powerful images can be blocked, I bet you've gotten an email in your life where you had to download the image to see it. Well, buttons show up no matter what and so having this very identifiable way to get people to go from point A to point B is really, really critical. My last best practice actually incorporates a lot of the concepts that I just shared. Keep it simple. I don't want to call out anybody on this call, maybe some of you do this, some of you don't, but one thing I have seen in my years of working with nonprofits is that nonprofits tend to have very long, complex emails and you really, really want to think that through. Firstly, here's the best practices. You want to keep your headlines to about 22 point font and your body text about 14 point font. You want to use those buttons, your calls to action, no more than three calls to action. The more calls to actually put in the email, the lesser of the results. You want to make sure that you're driving people to your website. Now we're going to talk a little bit more about that in a moment and if not your website, a donation page, a blog, you will want to get them from the email to somewhere else as quickly as possible. There's a lot of strategy behind that. We'll cover that in just a moment. Again, you want to keep those images down to about three. Now about text, you want to have about 20 lines of text overall on the maximum. Now some of you might be saying, well, Matt, we have all this news, we have to share, we have all this information. Well, in a moment, we're going to talk about segmentation and maybe all of your content doesn't necessarily have to go to everybody. Unfortunately, gone are the days where we can just do a one-size-fits-all, put it out there in email, and have it produce results. The biggest reason why we can't do that is mobile devices and how little time people spend on a mobile device reading an email. All of this talk about clicks, clicks, clicks, clicks. Well, you know, the fewer things you put in your email for people to click on, the higher the clicks, so why do we want these clicks? Why do we need these clicks so bad? Again, if we're going to want to build a relationship with our audience, we need to know as much about them as possible and the way that we do that is through click rate. Looking at who clicked on what? Click reporting and click rates have always been critical in helping a nonprofit grow, but they're now more important than ever so let's break down clicks and what they do for us. Firstly, driving people to your website is a great idea because it can increase SEO results, it can also increase the odds of a donation or other action. See, the thing is, is people don't spend a lot of time as I said, on a mobile device, in particular, reading an email and in fact, the dirty little secret is that most people don't actually read email, I don't and you likely don't. What we naturally do is scan and skim, we look for pertinent information, we look for calls to action that are useful to us and then we take action and so on a mobile device, the average read time, read time is only about 5 to 15 seconds. On a PC, Mac, or tablet, you have about 15 to 30 seconds max, but you really don't have a lot of time in front of your audience. Getting people to click from the email to somewhere else, ideally your website, is valuable because you're not only learning that this person clicked on that link, but you're also giving them more time to weigh out pros and cons of taking the action you wanted. Because they've committed to clicking, they're now committing to you, they're not committing to the cause, they're not committing to the ask, that's a critical thing to have them do because now they're starting to really think about your organization and what they can do for you. It's also the first commitment if they haven't made a donation or other action before. They're actually committing to you, another key thing to get them to do. Now, getting the click is the start of the relationship because it's a commitment as I said to do things with you in the future and even now, and its proof the email was received, opened, and tells you specifically what this person was interested in, and that's the big picture here. Because when you start to understand what groups of people like, you can start to segment out groups by that content. That way, if we're thinking about building a relationship, providing people relevant content is how we strengthen and retain relationships. Clicks and relationships. First, as I said, getting a click tells you what they're interested in. It also helps you gauge the success of your design. I'm talking about keeping your emails fairly short and simple. Well, this will give you an idea of whether you're on the mark with that design. As I said, you can collate people, people that click based on content, into smaller groups. Now some of you might be shouting out of the computer, "Matt, are you telling me to send now three emails, four emails, perhaps?" Perhaps now those of you that have constant contact and use our email plus system have the ability to actually have content change based on the subscriber data so that one email could be built that looks different to different people, but even if you don't, grouping people on smaller groups will help you give that more pertinent relevant content. By providing that relevant content, you're able to build programs and other content related to what they showed interest in. This is going to be really critical in building a relationship with somebody because the thing about email marketing in particular, is if we're sending content that's not perceived as relevant, then what happens is they start to ignore our content. Not everybody can donate the moment you send an email, we're going to talk about that in just a moment and so keeping people connected to you through a relationship, through relevant content, is going to help them make a decision to donate or attend or volunteer when the time is right for them. Frequent clickers also show a lot of value to you because they're likely very passionate. Paying attention to people that are regularly clicking on links in your email, will allow you to identify people that are most likely to actually take action with you. You can also consider leveraging this data to better improve your website. If you're noticing a particular piece of content or type of content is proving relevant to an audience, you might develop programs and pages on your website that deliver similar content. Now, you can even automate all this. You can create an automation series based on topics that you've identified as pertinent to a certain group of your contacts. You can deliver that content to those segments automatically. You can create, you can even in constant contact, create automated triggers based on the click itself, so the moment somebody clicks, you could send a follow-up email to them based on that content if you choose. Now, why all of this talk about personalization and segmentation? Well, you get that higher click-through rate, you get that higher behavioral rate, and getting that higher behavioral rate is critical. It's critical now because we want to create that relationship, we want to sustain a relationship, we obviously want people to react and getting that behavior is an important step in getting them to build that relationship with you. One thing that those of you that use Constant Contact, if you're not using and leveraging, something you may want to do soon, is use our click segmentation tool. Our click segmentation tool, when you're building your Constant Contact email, when you put a link into that email, you have the ability to enable click segmentation. It's simply a little toggle, that blue toggle you see in my example. Then you choose the list that you want to funnel these people into. Now, don't worry, it's not pulling them off the list you sent to, it's just copying their contact information into a new or existing list that you can later decide to use as a source for sending relevant content. When the person clicks on the link in your email, they're automatically added to this list. Now whether or not you take action on that right away, it's really up to you, but having these people broken out into smaller groups for you to use later, is a smart thing to do. Where does opens fit in all of this? Well, here's the thing. If you've watched me presented before, I have told you that opens were never a viable way for you to really gauge the success of your email. If we think about it, knowing that somebody perhaps opened an email doesn't tell us they actually read the email, it doesn't tell us what in the email they read. Tools like Gmail, Outlook, et cetera, that have a preview pane could represent as an open even though a human didn't even open it, they were just zipping up and down their inbox, but open rates have actually taken a dramatic turn in their importance as of last month. In September, on September 20, Apple updated their operating system for all their devices and they added an opt-in setting called Apple Privacy Protection and what that does is it prevents the use of invisible pixels that would gather information about the user such as when they open the email. Whenever an email was sent out, an invisible, tiny one-pixel by one-pixel image was sent out and when the image was displayed, it would tell us the email was opened, and then we could track it as an open. Now what Apple is going to be doing when people opt in to this, is they're going to preload the images before anybody even opens it, so when that email hits the inbox, it's going to "open it" it's going to display those images, which will count as an open. Now, this will include anyone that uses the mail app on an Apple device, whether or not they're using Apple's email service, if they're using Gmail, Outlook, many of us use Apple devices to check email from Outlook or from a work email address that would be affected by this as well. We can't just slough off anybody that uses the iCloud email, it's likely anybody and it's really hard to identify who it's going to be. This affects every email service provider, so Constant Contact and all of our competitors, it affects all of us. This is how all of us track opens and this change affects everyone. Constant Contact is updating our reporting to help you. One thing we're doing is we're changing the way that we display our click-through rate. Constant Contact previous to this change would show you a percentage of people that clicked versus the number of people that opened. Obviously, that's not the best metric to gauge because there's going to be inflated opens now. We can't count that that was a human opening it or not. Additionally, we're going to be rolling up other kinds of engagement tools for your emails. We know that some nonprofits either don't have a website, can't link to a website through some sort of guidance from their board or something like that, or they just don't link to things. That's just their business model. That's just what they do. We're going to be including other kinds of engagement techniques to get somebody to click, even if they can't go to somewhere else so at least you get that behavior and you get that feedback. What can you do? Continue to focus on click engagement. It is the metric that proves the email is delivered, opened, and specifically what people liked. You want to include those best practices that I shared today because that's a sure-fire way to get people to click more. You also want to set your fundraising and event goals and volunteer goals, you want to set that before you send out email marketing so that you can gauge the success of your email campaign. Lastly, you want to evaluate the use of automation and segmentation tools that use opens. If you use tools that will automatically send out emails based on an open, that's not necessarily going to be the smartest thing to do because we don't know anymore if a human opened it or not. Now to be clear, open rates were never the most important metric to pay attention to because again, there were full of false positives and false negatives before, but now it's all the more unreliable. It's definitely important for you if you're not utilizing some of the best practices that I shared with you today, if you're not paying attention to the click-through rate, you definitely want to be paying attention to that. Click rates and clicks actually build your relationships, so let's dig into that. Let's talk a little bit about building the relationship and understanding where email fits in. As I said, every contact, when you utilize email marketing, all those contacts are yours. It helps you strengthen a relationship with people because again, they gave you that contact information. There was an inherent relationship born the moment they gave you that email address. Now, again, you may have already had an existing relationship with them through a donation or through attendance or through volunteering, but all of that equals a relationship right at the beginning, continuing to leverage email marketing, and use those contacts that we established are so important to us earlier in today's presentation is a smart thing to do. Keep in mind that you own those contacts, unlike in social media, where basically you own nothing, and we learned a little bit about that yesterday. You want to treat those precious email contacts with care, be consistent in your frequency. This is another thing I see some nonprofits do is come around, giving Tuesday or through special campaigns, they up their email marketing starting to send more frequently, and then they pull off the gas and maybe they send once a quarter or so. You want to be consistent. Consistency is key in building the relationship, because one thing that happens when you send inconsistently, is that when your email hits the inbox, they may not notice it, or they may purposely ignore it because they're not used to hearing from you. You want to keep consistency in your plans. Our suggestion is at least one email every two weeks. If you can't do that, at least one email a month, be consistent and keep that content relevant. I keep using that word. Relevancy is critical. One way you can help your organization is check your assumptions. If you've done things the same way for years and years and years, it might be a good time, especially with the changes Apple made, to convince stakeholders, your board, other stakeholders in your organization, that it might be time to try a new strategy because you have these changes in reporting and you want to leverage best practices to get the most results out of your email marketing. One way you can get higher results is by leveraging the 80/20 rule in your email marketing. 80% of your marketing, your email marketing, and actually this is true in all marketing, especially social media, but 80% of your email marketing needs to engage your audience. There's a couple of ways you can do that. You can educate them and I think that's probably a natural place you go. You can also entertain them. You can curate content. One question I get fairly regularly from nonprofit audiences is, is it okay for me to share other organizations' content? Yes. In fact, you should. By sharing other organizations' content, you're establishing yourself as a thought leader, it's taking a load off your staff, as long as you attribute the original author and the original source, and you link back to the original, curation of content is actually a really smart strategy. If you're getting common frequently asked questions about your organization, an email might be a smart place to actually share those answers. Now, I don't mean answer every FAQ, but pick out FAQs you hear quite a bit and answer them as articles in your email. Share survey data. Now, I think this is something else that nonprofits pretty naturally do. One strategy you can do is to employ lightweight surveys, things like polls, where you can ask simple questions because surveys do something really neat in an email. One, they're obviously giving you information, but they're also encouraging people to act, to behave in an email, to engage, and a poll is a really great way to do that. Share success stories. Now, this is also something I think you probably do naturally, but making sure you focus on the importance of sharing these kinds of stories outside of just sharing news and what's going on inside your organization is a powerful way to engage people. Whatever you do, keep that content as relevant to the audience you're speaking to as possible because there's the appeal. With the appeal obviously, putting in a link so that people could donate is a huge piece of your strategy, but not everyone's able to act right now. When you hit send on that email, for whatever reason, not everyone's going to be able to donate, attend, volunteer, whatever you're asking them to do, they're not going to be able to take action, right then. For for-profits, I call this a sales cycle. Not everyone is going to be able to do something the moment you need them to do it. That's why it's 80/20. 80% of your content is focused around relevancy about keeping them engaged. 20% of your content should be the appeal. You can actually break this up into your email. You just want to balance your content, be mindful that not everyone can do something right this second, but if you continue to deliver regular, with good cadence, relevant content, you will see higher and higher results. Again, the way that you gauge what content is relevant is by paying attention to what people click on and using segmentation to break those people up so that you can deliver all the more relevant content. What I want to do is share with you a couple of ideas for content beyond the ones I've already shared. As I said, polls are a fantastic way to engage your audience. Constant Contact our email plus service, offers the ability to have polls right in your Constant Contact email. It's a great way to get information from people, but it's also a great way to get people to just click on something. Teaching people to click on something is really important. If you don't already, try employing storytelling, as a way you share information. People are drawn to stories, and it's a really great way to lead people from your email to somewhere else where they can complete reading the story. Highlight your volunteers. I'd be willing to bet you do this, but I add this content regularly. It's a great way to not only reward volunteers or partners but also to develop content and show that you're not always talking specifically about your organization. Video. Video's a powerful tool in email marketing. If an image speaks a thousand words, a video speaks a thousand images and video can be incorporated into a Constant Contact campaign. If you haven't already, those of you that use Constant Contact do know that we offer landing pages as well as email marketing. You can actually build little landing pages with the video embedded where people can watch it right there on the landing page. Preview something that's going on in your organization that you're excited about, build that excitement in your audience. Feature one of your employees. Now, featuring your employees does a couple of things for you. One, it obviously makes the employee feel valued, but it also further humanizes your organization and it's a great way to build a relationship because we like to build relationships with people and you can't get any more human than highlighting a human being in your email. Share content related to your nonprofit sector. Again, you're completely able to use another organization's content, especially if it's in the same vertical as your nonprofit. Obviously, you don't want to use something that's going to be somewhat competing with you, but it's a great way to build relationships with people. Highlight a sister nonprofit. In fact, that's a great way to help both of you build your list and your relevant content. Don't forget to use others to help you build content. Vendors and other stakeholders, make sure you're looking at them to help you develop content. When I was in a non-profit, one thing I was able to do was leverage our vendors to write content for us. In fact, a fun little story is one vendor that I actually reached out to, to develop content, was Constant Contact. They were able to write some content for me about email marketing. Of course, it was in Constant Contact's best interest, but it was actually valuable to my membership base, and not for nothing, it helped me develop some content that I didn't have to develop. Now, how does all this fit together? How do you leverage your relationships when it comes to email marketing? First, there's your non-profit and there's getting the email address. Once you get the email address, start sending regular content to stay with a regular cadence to stay top of mind. Use click data to segment. By segmenting you're able to keep your content as relevant as possible. Engage with them regularly utilizing that 80/20 rule. From there, once they convert and give you a donation, or register and attend, keep going. Keep that cycle going, and keeping relevant content out there, but also ask those subscribers to share your content. Either through sharing your email, because they can forward the email, or sharing content that you're putting out on social, on blogs, and other places, so that you reach a wider audience. Of course, you want those new people to then, sign up and join your list, and the whole process begins again. You can't act until you have the right tools. I'm going to share a Bitly link here in the chat real quick, and then we're almost at the questions, Lori. There we go. Constant Contact has been a partner with DonorPerfect for years and years and years, and I will go ahead and just pull the curtain back and say, it's my favorite organization talk to, to work with. DonorPerfect is just an amazing organization, and we have a fantastic offer for you. If you're not utilizing Constant Contact, you can save 50%, for three months on either our email or email plus programs. You can use that Bitly link to get started, and Lori, let's go ahead and hear what everyone has to say. Lori: All right. Let's have a look and see what we have. You have quite a few, so let's see where to start here. I'm going to scroll down. One of the first questions that was asked by Megan was, she said, wondering if videos have the same power as in high CTR, as images? Matthew: They actually have a higher. I don't have the latest click-through rate on video, Megan, but in general, they have a much higher click-through rate than image content. Now, a couple of caveats around video. The video, just to be clear, won't actually play in an email. Now, I talked a little bit about a landing page where it will play, but it won't actually play in the email and that's to help improve deliverability and actually getting your email delivered. What it'll do, is it'll link out typically to YouTube. Constant Contact does have an integration with Vimeo, so if you utilize Vimeo, you can actually synchronize your Vimeo account to Constant Contact. You also want to try to keep that content short, no more than about two minutes, but video's a fantastic way to engage your audience. The reality is people are lazy, and it's very easy for them to watch of a video rather than read text. If you have something where you feel like you're being too verbose, and your content's getting too long, consider shooting a short video. It doesn't have to be some blockbuster video to blow people away. It's just a quick way to educate and entertain and enlighten your audience. Another thing you can do with the Vimeo integration and Constant Contact is, in Constant Contact, if you go to the library tab, Vimeo is offering Constant Contact users, the ability to create really stylish videos, most of them for free, that you can integrate not only in Constant Contact but beyond. Lori: All right. Lindsay says, is there a way to include images in the email and people don't have to click download pictures to see the images? Matthew: Almost universally, that's actually what happens. When most people get email, the image loads and they don't have to download it. Now, there are circumstances where people do have to download images, but that's actually on a case-by-case, company by company, computer by computer basis. Basically what's happened is that the IT director or security director, something like that, has set rules that say that when an email comes in, the person must click to download it. That's very, very rare. The last time I checked about 20% of images are blocked now, where people have to actually act and take action. Lori: Andrea's asking, what is the maximum number of questions that you would recommend for a poll in the email, and could you build a contact list, tag, or segment based off of the choices in the poll? Matthew: I typically would go no more than about seven. It depends on the kind of poll you're doing. Something that's somewhat lighthearted, you want to keep to just a few choices. I'm going to go ahead and tell you a story about a non-profit I met in San Francisco. This won't apply to everybody, but I really loved their strategy. They used to have regular polls with serious questions about their mission, but then occasionally they'd throw in, I can't remember the woman's name, but it was something like Sally and it was Sally's silly survey. They would just ask random questions about, what's your favorite aerial character? Or like the Rice Krispies or something like that. That had the most engagement of anything they did. I loved that idea because it taught people in fun. It showed that the organization had a sense of humor, and a certain spirit, but it mostly just taught people to open and click, and that was really why they did it. They didn't do it all the time, but I thought it was a brilliant strategy. If you're trying to get something serious, I wouldn't ask for more than about seven. Now, as far as collation of that data, yes, you could actually track who clicked on what, and you can segment that out. Lori: All right. Stephanie asked, can you manage efficient segmentation with a small subscriber list, for example, 500 emails? Matthew: Yes, you could technically segment with two. Really, the strategy that all of you're going to have to employ and it's going to be unique to your organization, is how much bandwidth do you have to develop unique content? The reality is with a 500 person database, it might behoove you to just segment them by some very basic parameters. I'm oversimplifying here, let me be clear. In a membership based organization member, not member. Like on, off. Very simple segmentation. That's a good place for somebody with a small list to start. As your list grows, as you're able to get a bigger cross-sample of people, then you can start to think about further segmentation through some more complex content, that you might develop. Lori: One of the things that had happened during your session was, you had mentioned the integration with Canva. The chat blew up some. One of the big questions that continually got some upvotes was, how do you integrate Canva and Constant Contact? Now, I'm not saying you have to demonstrate anything, but if you can give any type of overview of how that works. Matthew: Sure. This would be an appropriate place to demo, but I'm not in any position to do it right now, but there's a couple of different ways. First is through Canva itself. We're working with Canva to develop a little icon where you can actually go to their integrations and integrate from the Canva side of your current Canva user. From the Constant Contact side, this is where it gets only a little complex only for a little while. Constant Contact's rolling out an updated editing experience. It's almost exactly the same as what anybody watching would be used to, but to find that email, with the Canva integration, you're going to want to go to Create. Then you're going to create a new email and you're going to type in the search window, the words, cross device. That's going to pull up templates, including blank templates, that will have the Canva integration. Now, in the very near future, before the end of the year, you won't have to do any of that. You'll go copy an old email and Canva will be there. You go create a new email it'll be in there. There's also Canva integrations if you use our social tool, which is also included in Constant Contact. You'll find Canva there and you'll find Canva in our landing pages as well. We'll make sure to get out some documentation through DonorPerfect, to everybody if you'd like. Lori: All right. I did just have a few things come in that said, the Bitly link doesn't work. Is there something they're supposed to be doing with that? Matthew: The Bitly link doesn't work. It worked in rehearsal. I'm trying it out right now. Yes, it's working fine. We'll look into it. I'm not seeing any problem on my side. Lori: Okay, they're all asking for the code again. Matthew: You know what I'll do, let me grab the full link and I'll post that with the chat. Lori: Okay. [pause 00:40:29] Matthew: Here we go. It looks like some people in the chat are saying it works but just in case, I just put the full link in there. Lori: Okay. All right, so let me scroll down to where we are. [silence] Matthew: Since we are so good on time and I always talk faster in live situations when we're doing rehearsal so I promise you my rehearsal landed right at because I wanted to land at 2:30 so we had about 15 minutes for questions. I was looking at the clock and I'm like, "Wow, why don't I go and demo that Canva integration?" That was such an exciting topic for everybody. Lori: We do have some questions though, we have some additional. Matthew: I'll go through this fairly quickly, of course. [silence] All right, so I'm in Constant Constant. I hemmed and hawed a bit when I was describing this because I don't want people to think we've done this radical change in our editor and you have to learn something new. The nice thing is you really don't have to do anything, you don't have to learn anything new. We've built our new editing experience to be exactly like our current one so we're just adding more functionality into it. Why don't you ask a question while I'm loading in here and then I'll do this demo? Lori: Etienne is asking, what would be a good frequency to send an email to our donors? Two weeks, each month? Do you have any suggestions or recommendations? Matthew: The question is around how often they do a donation request or just curate an email? Lori: Well, the question really just says sending an email. My assumption is they are appeals of some sort but she's asking how often you should be sending something out or could they be sending something out? Matthew: It depends on the organization. I'm from the mindset, the practices that I've seen work the best is that you always have a donation request in every email. It depends on how overt you go with it. In many of your emails, have that relevant content with just a link that you probably would have in every single email with your donation link in it. It's just a smart play because as I said, not everybody is able to donate the moment you hit send but some will and you want to make sure you get them too. Now, an overt ask, you probably don't want to wear out your welcome too often with that. Maybe once a month, I mean obviously if there's campaigns, GivingTuesday will be the easiest one for me to relate to you, you can increase your frequency. What you want to make sure is that you're balancing out that ask with other kinds of content because the one failure that I see some nonprofits make is that they'll just constantly ask, ask, ask and you'll burn out your list pretty fast with that. Here in the Constant Contact if you want to find the Canva integration, I go to Create email, and this is-- You're only going to have to do this for a short while so it's up to you if you want to go through this process. This does mean if you want to start playing with this right now, you will need to recreate your email. If I go cross device, all of these templates are utilizing our new editor and so if I go in [unintelligible 00:44:17] it's going to go to a basic one. [silence] Matthew: Forgive me audience if you're not interested in Canva. We have found that the non-profits really leverage Canva especially since they have some fantastic features for free. If you're not utilizing Canva I suggest you do but you simply got it anywhere you have an image can replace and there it is. The first time you do it it will ask for your Canva username and password. If you don't have a Canva account, it's going to ask you to create one. You can port images like if you do campaigns you can port them over to Constant Contact with the push of a button. You can create campaigns right there without having to leave Constant Contact. This month we're going to roll up the ability that if you use images in your Canva account, you'll actually be able to synchronize that, not just campaigns but the actual elements, the images that you're using to build campaigns. It's a fantastic integration and a great addition to Constant Contact. Lori: Some people were saying you were dropping gems during your presentation so all this stuff they really liked. Let me see, given unsubscribe happen with every email sent, how do you measure sending too many emails to your list? You mentioned sending an email every two weeks so this is you talked about your recommendations a minute ago but this is another question from someone else because you did mention the two weeks in there. Matthew: Firstly, the two weeks are not law, it's just a suggestion. I understand the hesitation in sending that frequently. This is all about that relevancy. I'm going to use a for-profit example but I think it's a good example. Which is I get an email every day that I open from an organization, I open it every day, it's my bank. Every day I open it because they sum up my balance, they give me the latest transactions, it's a very useful email to me. Would I suggest a nonprofit to send out every day? Absolutely not. It would be very hard for you to develop that relevant content. The reason I'm opening it up every day is because it's relevant so it's all correlated to relevancy. The reality is there's a couple of things with unsubscribes. Firstly, typically if you're doing a good job in your nonprofit communications and you're following a decent cadence, yes, you'll see people unsubscribe. It will happen but those people were very unlikely to engage with you. If they are willing to go through the steps to go down to the bottom of the email, hit unsubscribe, go to the website, hit unsubscribe again. They likely were not going to be a future donor. They are likely not to be a future volunteer so they're pruning your list a little bit. That's a good thing. What you want to pay attention to is the people that are not clicking in your emails because that's a better indication of people that are no longer paying attention to you. That's where that click rate and that relevant content really come into play. Again looking at your click data tells you what content was most useful to your audience and paying attention to that and segmenting people is how you were able to send more often but if you use Constant Contact in the reporting, actually glad I gave myself more time. If you go to reporting, one of the coolest features that a lot of organizations, for-profits and nonprofits, ignore is the segmentation report. The segmentation report is-- Oh, it's in contacts, sorry, not in reporting. The segmentation report does a lot of heavy lifting for you. They go to contacts and forgive me if you don't use Constant Contact, check the tools you use to see if they have similar features. If I go to segmentation, it's a little slow because we're going through all these different broadcast mechanisms right now but here is the segmentation tool. What I can do is I can create segments across a wide variety of different data points. I can create segments based on contact activity. Let's say that I want to create a segment based on people that did not click any email in the last 45 days and I just stop there. That already is really useful data because those people, if I've been sending out a regular cadence of email, knowing who's not taking action is really a good thing for me to know. I might save that as a list and try different campaigns with them, something very different. Different subject line, maybe send from a different time, maybe send from a different sender's name, see if I can pick up some of those people. Another thing you might do is start to pay attention to that group outside of email marketing like is there another way I can engage this audience? Additionally, you can stack these on top of each other. Let's say that I want to look at that kind of criteria across a specific list, or via a particular kind of person. If I've segmented people up by their job title, if I have that data, if I have the industry therein or anything else, I can actually build these segments out and you can have as many of these segments in Constant Contact as you want to use or not use whenever you want. What's really nice is it's living so I'm like a list that is somewhat static, it's when you integrate into Constant Contact, anybody that meets this criteria is going to be added. For instance, if this is a 45-day window, that's going to constantly be rolling. It's not just static in the moment and time that I created this segment. You can send to segment. If this loads a little faster, those of you that use Constant Contact, you're probably familiar to when you schedule an email, you choose the list you want to send to, right next to that is segments, and you can actually send the segments and what's nice about that is when you send to a segment, it's going to update the segment for you and include only the people that meet that criteria. If you haven't played with the segments tool, definitely do. It's taking a lot of the work that I described to you in the webinar and making it more simple. The first thing I do if the viewers are using Constant Contact is start leveraging that click segmentation tool when you create links. Lori: Okay. All right. Morgan's asking about the 80/20 rule and she says, "Should you then not include a give link on every email or should just the bulk of the email only be focused on appeal 20% of the time?" Matthew: There's two strategies to that. I said earlier, I think it's actually a really smart thing to include an appeal donation link in every email. It's just a matter of how much of that 80/20 you're going to devote to it. The two philosophies you can employ is 80/20 in the email itself and 80/20 throughout your entire marketing campaigns. Maybe 80% of your email is engaging content of some sort and you have that donation link and that's your regular email, but then overall, 80% of your overall email sends should be approximately engaging content with that little 20% piece with the donation ask and then, 20% is the over email sent specifically to get a donation from somebody. Lori: Okay. All right. From Chandler, "If someone forwards communication with links, if that third party recipient that the org does not have the email address clicks on a link in that capture, is that captured as the original recipients click through, or is it not captured?" Matthew: It's not captured. Lori: Okay. Matthew: Because we would know that the contact information don't associate that with. Now, one thing you can employ in our new editor and for those of you that have used Constant Contact for a long time, it's back and it's something a lot of nonprofits ask for. If I put in a social follow block, one of the options is-- Oh, I'm not-- Sorry, not social follow, social share. Social share allows people to share your content on their platforms, on their social media and so what I can do with that-- There we go. I can drive people to share my content on their social media, but there's also email and so we have Forward to a Friend again. We have the ability to actually with one button, somebody can share your email to someone in their list and while that won't-- Chandler, that won't track that new person, the idea here is that you're getting them to share your content and ideally, they're going to join your list because included when they share that email out, is the ability for them to join your list. Lori: I love that feature. Okay. I think you've already answered this in a few ways but I'm going to just make sure so that Anne knows, would it be okay to always include a Give link or a button in every email even if it's just an engagement email? Matthew: Yes. Again, I hope I didn't throw people off with the 80/20 rule. Obviously, donations are the lifeblood for most of your organizations, so include it. It's just a matter of how much of the content you devote to it. In my mind's eye, what I'm going to do is I'm going to go back to one of my examples where I have a nonprofit email and this is probably not the best example, but you can imagine. All right. Well, let's think about this content. I would actually fault this organization just a little bit because there's a little bit too much real estate devoted to the image here, but in theory, this is not the worst email because one, they're sharing relatable content with their audience, but including a donate button in every email, it's a great idea. It's just how much of the content are you going to devote to that? If you're only sending out nothing but donate, donate, donate, you're going to be turning off your audience. What you want to do is have some part of your email include the donation link and then occasionally do a donation first campaign where the donation, the ask is the reason you sent the email out. Just don't make the entire email the ask every single time. Lori: Okay. Samantha is asking, "Any suggestions to get people to open emails during COVID when people are getting more emails than before?" Matthew: That's an interesting one. How to get people to open more-- Lori: Yes. To prevent clutter. Matthew: Here's the "fun" fact, I'm using the word fun in air quotes, email centric behavior has gone up in COVID. There are higher opens. Obviously, now it's even a more dubious metric, but clicks have gone up. Like in Constant Contact, it didn't take us long to figure out why, it's because people are strapped to their computer longer and have access more. I'm going to have to go back to the conceit of my webinar, my presentation. There is no magic trick. You certainly want as far as your subject lines, if you're used to doing the same thing, if you're using the same subject line model over and over again, test your assumptions, try out something new, that might help. Getting people to pay attention to your email because it's COVID and they're burnt out on computers, there's no real trick. It's giving people relatable content. We'll come back to the question that somebody asked earlier about unsubscribes. The reality is most people don't unsubscribe to an email, they just stop paying attention to it. I'd be willing to bet, Lori, I'll use you as an example. You signed up to somebody newsletter, maybe a nonprofit, you're passionate about them, maybe you donated to them that you don't open, you may not even see it in your inbox anymore, because at some point they taught you that the content was not relevant and it became white noise. I'm certain that there are organizations that are for-profits that you just don't even notice hits your inbox anymore. That's the bigger danger and that's the recent employee relatable pertinent content to people. Another thing you can do is when you're sending an email, we've developed a new tool called Subject Line Recommendations, and this will actually scrub your content, best practices, and the nonprofit industry, and give you suggestions for subject lines. You can also employ split testing to test those subject lines. You can put in two different subject lines and test them out with your audience and automatically send the remainder of your audience the best subject line you can come up with. Those are the closest thing to magic tricks I can tell her, just make sure you're focusing on relevant content delivery and paying as much attention as you can to the stuff people are clicking on and making sure you're developing programs and content around that. Lori: Okay. Well, something that you just showed, with being able to have it scrub your content and give you best recommendations. I did have a few questions about, people saying that Constant Contact emails end up in spam, and how to avoid landing in spam boxes, is that one of the ways to be able to do that? Matthew: There's a couple of things you can do. The point of Constant Contact always end up in spam, we're the biggest player in the market. We send out a lot of emails, it's a little more identifiable. We don't always end up in spam, but there's some things proactively somebody using Constant Contact can do. One is to try the subject line recommendation engine. The second is, and I hate to keep complimenting our new editor, but one thing that's included in it is an enhanced-- It's missing. I must not be in. We have an email test, we have an email assistant that will actually scrub your content including subject lines, and it will actually tell you some things that you might've done bad with your subject line. For whatever reason, it's not loading for me right now. Let me go to review, maybe it's going to move there. Nope. One thing I'm suffering from is that we're actually testing this out. We're beta testing where's the best place to move it and it looks like it's been moved to my account. Seek out, it's called the Email Assistant or Check for Errors depending on where you are in the beta testing, and that will actually check your some people in content and see if it would help with, would more likely have you end up in the spam folder. I'll go ahead and tell everybody, and I guess this will be the last answer. Most common thing that people do to end up in a spam folder is they overuse punctuation in their subject line. You want to keep your punctuation down to-- You can use multiple forms of punctuation, but not triple like exclamation point, exclamation point, exclamation point, or ellipses. What spam folders will look out for is in the subject line. Too much use of punctuation will tell the spam folder that this is a spammer because spammers will often replace letters with characters. That's a quick way that non-profits often get into trouble is they use ellipses. Lori: I did not know that. That is what we have for today from Matt Montoya. I want to thank you for attending the session, this one around. I hope you'll join us for the next few. As always, Matt, that was a great presentation. Like somebody mentioned, you were dropping some gems, some things that I learned as well. I appreciate your time today. For the rest of you, you have a 15-minute break before our next session. Just a reminder, again, to stop by the booths, the rooms, the lounges, anywhere you can gather some information. Our next session is at 3:00 PM and is being presented by two of our trainers, Kelly Ramage, and Sarah Oland. They'll be presenting Community Learning Lab. No time? Try these automation and efficiency tips for your donor engagement. We'll see you there. Thank you, Matt. [silence] [01:01:49] [END OF AUDIO]

Major Gifts Every Day

Our panel will share how to use the tools in DonorPerfect and DonorSearch to find major gift donors, keep them engaged in your mission and increase the size of their gift.

Major Gifts Every Day

Description

Our panel will share how to use the tools in DonorPerfect and DonorSearch to find major gift donors, keep them engaged in your mission and increase the size of their gift.

Transcript

Darryl Moser: Greetings, everyone. I see a few more people that are actually joining us here in the attendee list. We'll get started here in just a moment. I wanted to welcome you all to another transformational session. My name is Darryl Moser. I'm the business development manager here at DonorPerfect. I have 30 years of experience working with nonprofits in software and in my role at DonorPerfect, I get to look for software tools that allow our clients to extend the functionality of their system through integrated solutions. I also serve on the board of my local food pantry/social service agency and look through the eyes of a nonprofit organization when we try to source these third-party products. Today we're going to be talking about transformative fundraising and certainly, through many sessions in this conference, you've hopefully gotten a chance to hear about donor acquisition and taking the donor through their journey. Some might say that major gifts are the endgame to that, but they don't really have to be the end. In today's session, we'll show you the techniques that you can practice on a day-to-day basis and engage those major donors. Today, our panel will walk you through best practices for major gift fundraising, as well as show you the best techniques to manage your data in DonorPerfect. We will hear from Donna Mitchell, who is a trained professional for more than 25 years and finds joy in helping nonprofits make a difference each and every day. Donna joined DonorPerfect six years ago bringing with her a fresh outlook. She believes that while fundraising is serious stuff, the learning process should be fun and empowering. Trust me, with the practice of this session, I know this is going to be fun today. In Donna's webinars and training sessions, don't be surprised if you are dancing, singing, or answering trivia questions. If only we had a camera on the crowd. In her spare time, you will find her cooking, bird watching, and snuggling up with her sweet puppy, Angel. Also with Donna, we will have Ryan Woroniecki. In his decade of experience with DonorSearch has helped more than 1,000 nonprofits use data to segment their database for successful fundraising. He started by building an ecosystem of for-profit partners to help his clients fundraise better. Since then he has helped organizations design prospect management services and plans for specific prospects. Focusing on major gifts, Ryan was able to help the all-volunteer Giving USA Foundation raise the most their annual fund has ever seen. With that, I want to go ahead and turn the keys over to Ryan, who is going to take us through some of the best practices that DonorSearch has been able to provide their clients major gift fundraising. Ryan Woroniecki: Thanks so much, Darryl. Really appreciate the opportunity to be here with Donna today. Really, I appreciate the opportunity to be here with Donna today. Who's kidding who? She is the main attraction. Thank you, everybody, for joining. We're very excited to have you here. Donna, I have a quick question. I know for the most part we'll do questions at the end, but someone asked if a recording of this will be available at the end. Darryl: Yes. In fact, this whole event site will be live for 30 days and after the session is over, you'll be able to go back into the session and do a replay on it as well. We will be uploading the slide deck to this session as well. Ryan: Okay, fantastic. Anything stupid I do, there's going to be video evidence of it for 30 days, so I'm going to try not to do stupid things. Darryl: Digital [unintelligible 00:03:47], yes. Ryan: That's right. That said, we're going to get this kicked off. There's a little bit of an exercise. I want you to pull your pens out or if you have access to your CRM in this web browser or a separate web browser, I'm going to ask you to dive in. We're going to talk about the importance of major gifts. There's a lot of ways to talk about it, but it's so much better if you figure out what do major gifts mean to your organization. What I would like you to do is I'd like you to write down or open up a WordPad, whatever it is, the amount of money you raised at your organization last year. Not you personally but the organization as a whole. How much money was that? Then what I want you to do next to that is I'd like you to write the 10 largest gifts that you received. The thought here is I basically want you to write how much money did the 10 largest donors give you? Now I don't want you to go in and I want you to figure that out in case a donor gave you multiple gifts and it adds up to an amount. I just want you to go and I want you to pull out the 10 largest gifts and once you're done, I want you to add those 10 gifts up. Once you've done that, you're going to divide the gifts by the amount of money that you raise. The thought is what we're getting at, what percentage of total dollars raised last year were the 10 largest gifts? I've done this exercise a few times. I did it at AFP Florida in June, that was before Delta showed up. When I asked different members of the audience after they had gone through this, one of the people said it was a little over 20%. One said it was in the mid-30s and then another one said it was somewhere over 40%, which was surprisingly large. Darryl, I believe there's a poll we were going to launch. Darryl: There is and I just published it, so it should be available to all of you that are in the audience, I believe, with your right navigational tool. There should be a poll listed under there, if you want to start selecting whether you're under 10%, 10% to 20%, 20% to 30%, or over 30%, that's the percent of total giving from your top 10 donors. Ryan: Now, Donna, you were going to sing while everyone was doing this, right? Donna Mitchell: Yes, I'm going to do some Jeopardy music, but let's see, what do you want to sing? People are still doing it, so we'll do the Jeopardy music. Just give you a little snippet. Darryl: It's perfect. Everybody's weighing in. We're starting to see it take shape. It's good stuff. Ryan: That's awesome. Donna, just out of curiosity in your DonorPerfect sandbox, which again, that's not real donors, but you add information all the time and you demo it. When you do that in your DonorPerfect sandbox, what does that cover? Donna: That's a great question. First of all, I want to thank everyone for being here. This has been such a wonderful conference so far. I've heard some great things, I saw some wonderful clients in here and just looking forward to the rest of the conference, but thank you. I did it in the database that we're sandboxing in for now and it actually came up to 13%. With our training database, it came up to about 31%, but in this particular database, it was about 13%. Our major donors comprise 13% of our total raised in 2020. Is there a question and maybe others are thinking that what should that number be? What's a nice number for that to be? Ryan: Oh, I don't think they're-- I don't know. The real answer is I don't know. I haven't done the research to dig in. You've probably talked to a number of experts at the Giving Institute of which DonorPerfect and DonorSearch are both members and they could tell you what a healthy breakdown is. Unfortunately, I'm not sure. What I do know is if it was something like 70%, that would be very scary because you don't have a very diverse revenue stream. What I'm looking at on the screen is I see a 20% and a 21%, which is probably pretty good, right? That would mean you have a fairly diverse revenue stream. Darryl, somebody else said that they don't see the poll. Are there poll results, and if so, what are they? Darryl: There are. I know a number of people who have registered. Just for clarity, I still have the poll open. You should be able to access the poll from the right-hand side of your screen. It's one of the icons next to chat Q&A, and then there's a poll button, and you should see an active poll in there that's got four categories that you can go ahead and register your vote. Ryan, you may also be able to see the poll if you access it that way. If not, I can go ahead and read off what these numbers are looking like because it's really starting to take shape. Ryan: Oh, there we go. I have to scroll down. Now I see it. Okay. Technology is really helpful when you know how to use it. User error is the biggest reason why things don't get done. We've got a healthy disbursement of these. Under 10%, that's 10.5 people or 10.5% of the respondents. 10% to 20% of all dollars raised is 38.7. That's the biggest group. Between 20 and 30 is 22%, so roughly a quarter. 30% plus is growing. It's now up to 31.3%. If you think about what do major gifts mean for my organization, if you eliminate those 10 largest gifts, presumably they're major gifts, that could eliminate somewhere between 10%, 20%, 30%, maybe even more, from total dollars raised. That's a scary way to think about it, but the beautiful way to think about it and what we're going to focus on for the rest of the session is, "Hey, what happens if we get more of these? Maybe we can raise a lot more money as an organization." The thought is, if you've got donors coming through at the beginning of the donor journey, and they're making a gift, how can you figure out who you could engage, and how much you engage them so that they too could become a major donor, and continue to diversify your revenue streams and grow total dollars donated? Donna, I believe we are good on this exercise. Can we please go to the next slide? Donna: Sure. Ryan: The importance of major gifts, we spoke about that a lot. One thing that I will talk about is from a fundraising efficiency perspective. If you focus your time on the most qualified major gift opportunities, and we'll talk about what does qualified mean, that is the quickest way for you to grow revenue sustainably, because just like the theme of this whole conference, relationships and community, by engaging your donors, you should be creating a community for all of them at your organization. Frankly, they should be furthering their community by engaging with you, and you can't engage if you don't have a relationship, right? You're building these ongoing relationships that will foster a community, and ultimately, that is the quickest way to grow sustainable revenue. Now on the next slide, sorry, I misled you a little bit there, Donna, we're going to talk about a study. This is a study that DonorSearch did, and the thought here is we're going to try and qualify what does a good major gift opportunity look like? I don't think I said this, but DonorSearch, we're a prospect research company, wealth screening company, we're now a machine learning company. We help folks identify major gift opportunities and a bunch of other opportunities too. The most important part of this is we're an integrated solution with DonorPerfect. It's the only ad that you'll hear from me, those few words. That said, we analyze files for nonprofits all the time to try to help them find good opportunities. A while back, we did some regression analysis and we tried to say, "Hey, look, when we look at all these files, these organizations tell us how much money these people have given to them. What data is it that DonorSearch appends to a record or identifies, that says, 'Hey, this person's a good opportunity'?" Historically, well, screening has been all about trying to find real estate, so if someone has a lot of real estate, is that a good predictor? What about if they sit on the board of a grant-giving foundation? What if they're an SEC insider? What if they've made a gift to a different nonprofit? With this backtest, we were able to figure all that out. We looked at data from over 400 of our client organizations, we anonymized it. We didn't know who had what name, or where they were necessarily. All we knew was that, collectively, they made up two million individuals, and those two million individuals or households, oftentimes it's couples, collectively, they gave over $5 billion to those 400 orgs. Now we're going to talk about, hey, how do we do that analysis? How does one do this kind of regression? Darryl, you look like you're going to say something. Darryl: I was, and maybe it's just to provide clarity. A few people had actually asked the question when they were doing that calculation, and particularly as it relates to the research that you have represented here, what gets included in a major gift? Should grants be included in that calculation? You had mentioned some people might actually be the head of foundations who give grants. What's your recommendation towards considering that as a major gift? Ryan: Yes, that's a really good question. I think that would be dependent upon the type of foundation and the type of relationship that you have with that foundation. We're going to say that Donna has done incredibly well in life, and Donna, you now make Jeff Bezos look poor, you are the nation's first-ever trillionaire. Because you're such a wonderful human being, you want to use some of your money for good, and you're going to donate it, so you decide to create a private foundation. You believe that's the most efficient way for you to make these gifts and also for you to get the tax benefits associated with making these gifts. You treat the foundation, basically like your personal philanthropic checkbook, because of the way you've set it up. If someone receives grants from Donna's Foundation, and they really have this personal relationship with Donna, and that's what's driving these grants, then I would treat that like a major gift. Otherwise, if that is not the case, and it's not a deep personal relationship with one person or a couple, or maybe an entire family, and that relationship is driving to giving, grants should not be considered major gifts. They are a important and separate part of your fundraising operations. What is a major gift? That is a very squishy thing. At some organizations, a major gift's $1,000. At Harvard, it's got to be at least six figures before it's a major gift. We're not defining major gifts with $1 value because we can't say what the culture of philanthropy at your organization considers to be a major gift, we can't. Only you can define that. Only your organization and the donors and the board can define that. Whatever is a major gift, if people meet these criteria, they're more likely to do that as a whole. Darryl, did that answer the question? Darryl: I think it did. I think it's really key what you said about the personal relationship. If you're cultivating that grant through a person that you are [unintelligible 00:16:26], then the relationship is a major gift. To me, that really resonated. I know in my nonprofit, there are lots of grants that I would say we apply for that are completely faceless, and then there are grants of people that actually live in our community that are at the heads of the boards, and foundations, and so forth. There, those relationships are super important, so we tell our executive director to make sure that that relationship is in really good shape. Ryan: Do you track those the way you would track major gifts in your fundraising system, in your DonorPerfect platform? Darryl: I would say in our nonprofit because we're relatively small, we only have about 5,000 constituents that are inside of the system, there isn't a whole lot of tracking like that, but the grant process that they've gone through definitely had more tracking, and they are using DonorPerfect to register all of those grants inside of the total gift picture. Ryan: Got it. Because your organization doesn't really have a sophisticated major gifts program, because you're so small, which is really common, you don't have much of the standard tracking process that another organization would, I can tell you in my limited experience, when I volunteer for the Giving USA Foundation, historically we have some committees we meet every so often once a month, ideally, and we have names in a spreadsheet. It's not even a database. We're trying to change that. That said, it is really dependent on the organization. You might not have the ability to really aggressively pursue major gifts. In all honesty, there was a study done a few years back that was conducted by MarketSmart, and one of the things that we learned in that study was if you're an organization that raises $3 million, or less than a year, you're most productive. You're most successful with major gifts when you're targeting 50 people or less because you just don't have the bandwidth. Again, it goes back to these relationships, major gifts are not transactional. You need to have not necessarily a long-term relationship with somebody, but a deep understanding of what does the mission of your organization mean to that person. That's essentially the key to understanding how can you help them further their philanthropic interests through your organization. When you know that you can get a major gift. It's tough for one person to do that with a lot of people, and so that's why going back, small numbers are good, and what you described as a smaller organization totally makes sense. Now we're going to have fun with math. That's actually the next slide. We're going to ultimately play a game. The game is called "Who do we call who invite?" The thought is you've got a small list of donors from the previous week, or from yesterday, however you want to consider it, and you're only going to have time to call one. What we're going to do now is we're going to go through those markers of philanthropy that will help guide who it is that we're going to call when we get that little exercise. The first thing to focus on is giving to your organization. For the purposes of major gifts, you want to engage people that have already given to you. It can be a little different at a higher ed institution where you've got alumni. Although, typically, that's still not the case. You try to engage the donors. It is a lot easier to get somebody to upgrade to a $5,000 gift than it is to bring somebody into the organization at the $5,000 level. If you think about donor retention, even small gifts, it's not necessarily easy to get somebody to give a second time, but it's a lot easier to get somebody to give a second time than it is to get somebody to give a first time. Focus on the giving at your organization. An easy way to track this, and I think there's a way to do this inside of DonorPerfect, it's the RFM, which stands for recency, frequency, and money. Donna, I see you nodding, is that a fairly simple report inside DonorPerfect? Donna: It's actually a way that we can run some reports to get the recency, frequency, and monetary value of each donor. There are different reports that we could do to get that and then we are able to create the fields to grade them on the RFM. Then combining that total that will tell you the value of those donors. We do have a webinar on this and so it's called Tracking Donor Trends. This is really a wonderful webinar that speaks directly to this. Ryan: Oh, that's fantastic. If you're really interested in this stuff, there's a book called Fundraising Analytics, it was written by a guy named Josh Birkholz. Josh is currently the CEO of a company called BWF, it's a fundraising consulting firm. He's got an entire chapter dedicated to the RFM. He's a math whiz. Just so you know, RFM, it stands for recency, frequency, and money. The thought is you want to figure out who's given to you most recently, who's given to you most frequently, so the biggest number of gifts, and then who's given you the most money. Basically, the people that score highly in those three categories, they're going to be some of your best opportunities for major gifts, because those are three good markers of a healthy philanthropic relationship. That is the first marker. We talked about that a lot because it's so important, it's the most important one. The next one is giving to other organizations, and where we found that ends up being really predictive is a gift of $5,000 or more. In the olden days, the BC days, before COVID days, when people would regularly go to the theater and see a performance, in the back of the programs, you might see, "Hey, there's a list of donors and subscribers." Non-profits oftentimes published donor honor rolls where they have donors at different ranges or tiers or giving circles. As a company, we collect that data and we're able to say, "Hey, really, this person made a gift of X thousand dollars to this organization." When we were doing our backtesting, we found, "Hey, there's a really small group of people responsible for giving a large percentage of that $5 billion away who have made gifts of $5,000 or more elsewhere." That is the second most predictive piece of information. Behind that, it's people who sit on the board of grant-giving foundations. Behind that, it's people who make sizeable political gifts. We'll talk about these first three or these next three a little more in detail. After that, it's real estate. We won't talk about real estate that much because actually real estate's not incredibly predictive of someone being philanthropic. Lastly, it's business affiliations if someone's an executive at a company where the revenue is 5 million or more typically, or if they're an SEC insider. When I said real estate is not incredibly predictive, at some levels, it is, it can be predictive. The thought that you want to have in your mind is someone's got 2 million or more in real estate. I'm currently in a hotel room in San Diego and I get to tell you, $2 million in San Diego is not a lot, and it wouldn't be that predictive here. That's pretty variable. Anyway, we're going to focus on two, three, and four next, but this is when we're going to do some math. We're going to see what kind of a math teacher Ryan would have made. Donna, can we please go to the scary next slide, where we talk about the methodology that's used. [screams] It's not Halloween yet. Don't scare me. In the subsequent slides, you're going to see slides with identical column headings. You'll see percentage of donors, percentage of giving, and predictive strength. The thing I'm going to talk about is the predictive strength. That's ultimately what's driving the discussion. Over here on the left, we did a few examples so that we can say, "Hey, how does this math work?" If we just benchmark the full database, this is just level set and say, "Okay, we're looking at 2 million donors and so that's 100% of the donor population in our study. Those 2 million donors have given $5 billion, so that's 100% of the dollars donated in our study. The predictive strength of that is one because when you divide 100% by 100%, you get 1. Now we're going to go down and we're going to talk about a category of people I fall into, which is people who think they can dance, but they absolutely cannot. Oh, that's you too? Donna: I'm a [unintelligible 00:26:01] dancer, what can I tell you? [laughter] Ryan: Really, all that matters is that you're having fun. In this case, we're saying that's 30% of the donor population. That's 600,000 individuals out of those 2 million. That 30% of the people, they're responsible for 80% of the giving or $4 billion. How do we get to the predictive strength when it's not one-on-one? Really, we're going to divide 8 by 3 and you get 2.6, 80% by 30%, you get 2.6. The thought there is that that is the predicted strength. Yes, anyways, so that's 2.6. Now we're going to go down because this is about relationships. We're going to talk about the people who use match.com and as we all know, if you're using match.com, the goal is to stop using match.com. This is going to remain a small percentage of the people. Out of the 200 million people, it's 5% and they are responsible for 50% of the giving. When we divide that 50 by 5, we get 10. The predictive strength is 10. In this imagination land that we're going through, donors use match.com, it turns out that's a really good predictor. They're 10 times more likely to make a sizeable gift than someone who isn't using match.com. Then lastly, again, because we're talking about community, we want to focus on the people who want to use meetup, but they can't understand how to make it work. They're having user error like it was a moment ago with the poll. That, in this hypothetical, would make up 75% of the group. They're responsible for 5% of the dollars donated. When you do that math, the number is smaller than one, so it's bad, bad marker. Basically, if somebody can't use meetup, you don't want to approach them for a major gift. Statistically, they're less likely to make that gift. Also, I'm noticing some of the math, the numbers in black are way wrong and they don't add up to please ignore that. Donna, let's go to the next slide, and let's use this methodology in our study. In our study, if we look at this, we're saying what's the single largest gift DonorSearch found somebody making elsewhere. We've got the benchmark up at the top again, but we're going to go all the way down to the bottom. We're saying, when we're looking for people who we believe made a gift between $5,000 and $10,000 elsewhere, that was 1.1% of the 2 million individuals and that 1.1% of the 2 million individuals was responsible for about 5.5% of the $5 billion donated. Somebody who's made a single gift of $5,000 to $10,000, they're five times more likely to make a major gift in general to any organization. Sometimes you might say, "Hey, well, this person made a really large gift to this organization," but that's a really different organization. Well, that's okay. It's not a guarantee that the person is going to make a large gift to your organization, because they have to really like what you do and they have to be engaged. Statistically, someone who's made a $5,000 gift is more likely to make a $5,000 gift again and that's what the math is showing here. If we go all the way up towards the top, less than 1% of our 2 million individuals gave the gift of $100,0000 or more. That less than 1% was responsible for almost a quarter of the $5 billion and so that predictive strength is 34 when you do the math. Someone who's made a six-figure gift somewhere else, they're 34 times more likely to make a major gift than someone who has not. That's why we focus on giving elsewhere. Let's hop over to the next screen, which is going to be foundation trustees. This is looking at data a little bit differently. In this case, we're saying on the left-hand side, what are we looking at? We're looking at the average lifetime giving, how much money has this person given to the organization over their lifetime as a donor? It could be 1 gift, it could be 18 gifts. Then below that, we're looking at the average gift size. When they make a gift, what is the average gift size? Let's focus on average lifetime giving. The thought is, if we look at all donors, all donors have given on average $315 to these organizations. When we just look at the people that sit on the board of a grant-giving foundation, on average, their lifetime value is about $1,000 higher. It's $1,300. Now, this doesn't necessarily mean that they are making gifts or awarding grants from the foundation. They can make these gifts as cash gifts or they could give in other ways to the organization from themselves directly. The thing to look at here is not, "Oh, they're a foundation trustee. Their foundation is going to award us a grant." It's just simply saying, "Hey, people who spend time making philanthropic decisions for a foundation, they're much more philanthropic themselves." If we look down below that average gift size, all donors, again, the average gift size is $87. If you're a foundation trustee, the average gift size is $257, so about three times higher. Again, if someone sits on the board of a grant-giving foundation, they are a good prospect typically. They could tell you they're not interested, but you don't know that until you ask. On the last slide here, before we go to our game, we're going to look at political giving. Political giving, oh, we gave it away. There's a ghostbusters theme. Donna: I know, I totally messed up, sorry. Ryan: It's okay. I've made worse mistakes earlier today. The political giving. What we found is that when somebody made a single gift of $250 or more to any political or a party, they are in the top 6% of the countries. 94% of the country has never made a one-time $250 political gift. If someone's made $1,000 political gift, a one-time $1,000 political gift, they're in the top 1/10 of 1%. 99.9% of the country has never made a one-time $1,000 political giving. What we found is if someone's lifetime political giving is $15,000 or more, they've made a 5, 6, 7, 8 larger than 8, maybe figure gift to a non-profit. There is a direct correlation between political giving and philanthropy or generosity at a high level. If you look at these stats here, what we're doing is we're saying, "Hey, if people's giving down at the bottom is $500 or more, then that represents 14% of the 2 million individuals and they're responsible for almost 3/4 or 75% of the $5 billion and the predicted strength is 25. If people are making political gifts, they're a good opportunity. One thing to be aware of, there's an association called Apra. Apra, think about it as AFP, but just for people that do prospect research and prospect development. They decided that it is not okay to use political giving in this way. They basically said, "Hey, at your organization, you need to decide if this is something you're okay with." They said that because the FEC, the Fundraising Election Committee, I believe, they said you shouldn't use political giving for fundraising purposes. That said, another company challenged that ruling and the FEC said, "Hey, actually, we can't say yes or no, that the use case you're describing is good or bad." The use case is literally what we've just been talking about. The FEC had an advisory ruling, but then when it was challenged, they didn't really uphold it themselves. Apra has taken the conservative approach there. I share all of this with you just to say, this is very powerful and very predictive data. If you'd like to use it, you should, just make sure that that is a decision that is discussed at your organization. In our product, by the way, you have the ability to turn political giving data off if you do not want to use it. All right, so now we're going to play the fun game. Donna: Come on y'all. Come on now. There we go. All right. Well, I can't see you dancing, but I know you are. Ryan: The thought is you've got time to call one person. We talked through these predictive markers to try and highlight, "Hey, what says somebody is a good opportunity." Now we're going to try and apply that in what would be a really nice real-life situation. On the next slide, you're going to see data that's been pulled from a DonorPerfect report. These are yesterday's donors. We're really lucky to have these donors, by the way. I don't know if you're familiar with the Marvel movies, but a lot of these folks are in the Marvel movies. We've got Zoe Saldana, Mark Ruffalo, Don Cheadle, he's my personal favorite because I think he's a phenomenal actor, but we don't call Don because we want to gush about what a wonderful actor he is. We've got time to be good fundraisers and call one person so that we can thank them for their gift and try to jumpstart the fundraising process. Darryl, I believe there is a poll that we can launch so that everyone can participate and say, "Hey--" Darryl: There is a poll, and I will publish this one. We will just give it a little bit of talking points here that Ryan and Donna can go through. I'm seeing a few people register who they think is going to get it, and then I'm going to close the poll and I can share the results with everyone. Ryan: Thank you for launching that, Darryl. Donna, we have a lot of people who are saying Bradley Cooper's the guy to call. Donna: I don't think that has anything to do with his wealth, I'm sure. Ryan: Well, you could be right. Depends who's voting, we don't know their preferences, but if we look at the giving data on this screen, why would we want to call Bradley? What about these three pieces of data, the last gift amount, lifetime gift total, and number of gifts would say Bradley Cooper's worth a phone call? Donna: If it were me, you're asking me specifically? Ryan: Yes, yes, yes. [unintelligible 00:38:35] in the hot seat. Donna: I'm going to say the numbers are very close as far as lifetime giving totals. It's number of gifts so that frequency, that person is giving us more often, so that would be my choice other than the fact that he's hot. Darryl: Are we ready to see what our audience says? [unintelligible 00:38:57] good shape here, so I'm going to bring the poll to one end and then publish it to the whole group here. Ryan: Darryl, what does it say? Darryl: Well, it looks like most of our audience actually says Bradley Cooper at 45.6% is the one who's going to be the one that they would call again, whether it's for fundraising or otherwise. Then Don is at 38.6%. Jeff comes in at 8.8% and Zoe Saldana at 7%. Ryan: Thank you and now, just to be clear, there's not really a wrong answer. It's really easy to justify all of these not based on who they are as people per se but because of their relationship with the organization. Hypothetically, Zoe might be a good person to call because for the first time she gave $5,000, which is a really high dollar amount as a first-time donor. Jeff Goldblum was next. Jeff gave two gifts, $1,050 again. He's given you twice so that's basically reinforcing, Hey, I do like this organization. Don Cheadle has given three gifts. That's a fair amount of commitment and Don's also given more money than anybody else here. Yes, Donna at your point Bradley Cooper gave four gifts. He's given more gifts than anyone else here, he's the most loyal. Actually what we've found by the way, if someone's given 20 consecutive years, you need to call them immediately and ask for a planned gift. That's a different session. Now we're going to layer in more data and we're going to play the same exact game. We're going to say, "Hey, we know the real estate value of these people." As an example, Chris Pratt didn't really seem that special before, but he's got $9 million in real estate. Maybe we want to call him. Darryl, could you please release the next poll? Darryl: We have started the poll. We have four possible answers here. If our audience wants to go ahead and register who they think they would call based on this real estate data. Ryan: In a normal world, the way it works is I try to navigate between all of you and I just tapped somebody on the shoulder and say, "Hey, who would you call?" In this world, we want you to use the poll and want you to tell us, hey, who's the right person. Darryl: I think I [unintelligible 00:41:30] a bit more thoughtful this time around. Donna: They're getting, yes. I could announce this like a horse race, but I don't want to-- [laughter] Darryl: [inaudible 00:41:45] Donna: I don't want to give it away. Ryan: Coming down the track, it's [unintelligible 00:41:51] [laughter] Ryan: Someone in the back is shouting. Come on, Paul, come on, Paul, go Paul. [laughter] Donna: You can do this. Darryl: Alright, we've got some definite shape to this one. We're going to go ahead and end the poll here and then share the results. All right and it looks like we've got 46 votes and 60.9% work for Chris Pratt, 19.6% for Don, 17.4 for Tessa, 2.2 for Zoe. Donna: Chris Pratt is hot too. Ryan: Yes, it's again, there's multiple reasons to call but yes, even out in California, and most places, $9 million is still an impressive house. There's good reason to reach out to Chris. What we're doing is we're using the available information. On the next slide, we're going to see even more information. This is we're going to bring it home. This is the last slide. There are no more polls after this slide. I know you're all very sad but in this case, we've laid it on two more pieces of data. One of them is whether or not somebody is a foundation trustee and then the last one is the largest gift bound, lower range. What's the single largest gift we believe they made somewhere else and Darryl, it looks like you have launched the poll. Darryl: I have launched the poll. We're already getting our first vote in and it's interesting, Ryan, as these have gotten more and more progressive, I can feel the thought processes. Donna: Yes, definitely. Although somebody really likes [unintelligible 00:43:35] a lot. Darryl: I'm not sure that the data is [crosstalk] Ryan: While we're doing this, they're a few comments in the chat. Someone did say that Chris Pratt always calls me so a way to go, Catherine but there's some other neat ones. Don Cheadle from Kansas City so he's local to Kelly Hurst and he's environmentally friendly and interested and involved and no surprise. He's super cool. No surprise. Emily Hill had a very insightful comment that was Don is just smart enough to hide his assets. It is not uncommon for wealthy individuals to hide their assets in trusts or other vehicles that make it difficult to find. If Don's house on paper is owned by a company that doesn't have his name on it, it's going to be really tough to figure out that it's his. Darryl: [unintelligible 00:44:44] I should probably just clarify here, the data that we are actually looking at since it's very likely that many of these people may appear inside of the Donna search database, is this data purely fictitious for our exercise? Ryan: Some of it is, and some of it is not, but I'm not going to reveal what's true and what's not true. Darryl: All right. Ryan: Where are we at with the poll? Where does the-- Darryl: I think that's some shaping. It's rather interesting. We'll go ahead and end the poll here. It looks like we've got 61 votes in and Tom Morello is our winner at 41%, Zoe at 34.4, and Don at 16.4, Chris now drops down to 6.6 and Bradley is at 1.6. Ryan: The good news is there's nothing wrong with calling any of those folks. They're all recent donors and statistically, what we're looking at here is there are good markers that would make you want to reach out to them and so if we just talk about the top twos, Zoe and Tom. Number one and a really big range against the machine fan. That is why Tom Morello is listed there. He doesn't really fit the theme otherwise but so Tom, not the most important one, but he does have that $2 million piece of real estate thing going for him. He's made a gift of $2,300 elsewhere. That's a nice gift, statistically, not super predictive, but you will pay attention and he sits on the board of a grant-giving foundation. He's a really good opportunity to reach out to, and then behind him according to the poll you've got Zoe, Zoe made a $50,000 gift somewhere else. Both of these folks are first-time donors and the thing that I really want you to think about is when have you made a gift and gotten a phone call the next day or within a week to thank you. You probably haven't, that's a really powerful thing. That just goes to show if you call any of these people, it's good because you're doing ideal fundraising work. On the next slide, we're actually going to talk about how to get this data and donor perfect. I'm going to shut up and it's Donna's show. Donna: [laughs] Hi. I'm back and yes, we're going to show you how you're going to be able to get this data in DonorPerfect now. Understand when I show you this, we're going to jump right into DonorPerfect and this information has been uploaded to these donor records. Before I jumped in to create the report, I actually want to show you a record. Let's go into Tom or [inaudible 00:47:29], all of this data actually live on the bio screen in this particular case and [inaudible 00:47:39] You will see all this donor search data. When you do a search, when you go to update a profile, these values will display. Now we can report on any of these fields. I'm going to be using our easy report writer and the ease of report writer is ideal for creating your own customized reports. Particularly if you have user-defined fields that you want to include in a report. We're going to show you how to replicate the report we just saw and I'm going to go to reports there on that menu ribbon and down to the report center. Now the report center is the hub of all of our reports and you may or may not have the easy report builder, but trust me, even if you don't have it, you can still do an export to file in order to get that report and what I've done-- Who do you call, three, I'm going to go over to actions and select edit, and you'll see all of the different things we can do with an easy report, again, depending on your package. I began creating this report and you will see that I have the full name of the donor. I have my last gift amount, lifetime gift total, the number of gifts and these fields are all DonorPerfect system and calculated fields that will calculate your donor's giving history as they are giving gifts. The real estate estimate and the foundation trustee, those are the donor search fields that we've selected. Over here on this list, I'm going to search for that largest gift given elsewhere, or I'm sorry, largest gift in the lower range. All I need to do is go into the search. Type in largest gift and there is my largest gift found in lower range. I simply click on it and there we have it, just goes right into the report. Your easy reports are simple as a click or click and drag to move the fields in that you want. We do have some other options with an easy report. If I go to the options on the donor name, I can do a count. I can count the number of distinct records and then I can also do totals anywhere else I decide to if I wanted to do that. Let's just go ahead to this lifetime total under options and do a sum. Easy peasy. Now, I'm going to click on save and open. You can always come back and edit this report as desired, add [inaudible 00:50:25] and all of that. What we're going to do is we're going to run [inaudible 00:50:31] based on the records that I want. I just created a filter, donor search, yes. That's just something that I did. Of course, you can always use one of those fields as a criterion. I want to see anyone where the foundation trustee is equal to yes or maybe. You can do any of those things. Let's go ahead and run our report, and you will see my data display based on the fields that we've selected. All right. Here we are. I'm just going to hide this so we can see this a little bit better and make that a little bit bigger so you can all see it. What you'll see is that field is actually there, and this is a replication of the report that we just saw. We are able to see this information and any other donor search information that we want on those records. Here you'll see, we have a grand count of 28 donors, and we have a grand lifetime total from those donors of $152,125. It's very, very simple, as you can see, to be able to create these reports, pulling in any of the donor search fields, as well as other DonorPerfect fields as desired. All right. Ryan: Thanks, Donna. To that point, you don't need the donor search data to get the first three pieces of information that we were using. Donna: Correct. [crosstalk] Ryan: Regardless of whether or not you have donor search, it doesn't matter. You can still do this exercise to figure out, "Hey, I only have time to call one person and I don't have a whole lot of time for major gifts, unfortunately. Who should it be?" You can use DonorPerfect to do that. Donna: Right. Perfect. It's DonorPerfect. [laughter] Donna: Just like to get that in there. [laughs] All right. Let's get back to our presentation. Darryl: Right. I know that we've been talking about how to figure out who to call, but one of the challenges that I keep hearing and even inside of my nonprofit as well as from the customers that I bumped into, is that, "Gosh, how do I do it? What's that cultivation technique? Do I have to live on match.com to actually figure out how to build a relationship, or what is it?" I'm hoping you can help us out here, Ryan. Ryan: Well, full disclaimer. I would not recommend you go to match.com to try and find donors to your organization. That would be a horrible mistake and highly unethical. Not an ethics session, but it is AFP ethics month. There's one, hopefully, that's not a nugget of information for anyone. There it is. [crosstalk] Donna: My mom would say, "Don't do it." "Why?" "Because I said so," so don't do that. [laughter] Ryan: Bingo. How do you continue the relationship? How do you engage people? The thought is, and Donna, it might be possible that these slides are backwards because I think there should be a slide for the first phone call. Donna: Oh, my. Ryan: Is there another slide after this? Here we go. They're backwards. I apologize-- Donna: It's my [unintelligible 00:53:58] finger. Ryan: You got a quick trigger finger. I do not want to face you in the Old west draw-up. Tips for calling a donor. Number one. The first thing to do, it's fundamentals, thank the donor. Thank the donor for their gift. Number two, again, it's really easy. You want them to talk most of the time. If you're talking most of the time, you're probably not doing this right. You want to ask them why they gave or what brought them into the organization. Get them talking about, if you can, their emotions because giving is an emotional thing. You want to have an impact. What was the impact? One of the things you could ask them is, "What were you trying to accomplish with that gift? What did you want that money to do to the organization?" When they talk about it, they should highlight one or multiple parts of the organization, some different points of the mission. You should draw out through conversation why that's important to them, and then tell them a little bit about what you're doing along those lines. Again, it should be conversational. You shouldn't jump in and just start spouting the mission. You should talk about the pieces of the mission that are relevant in a conversational way. Then lastly, my recommendation is that you don't ask for another gift on this phone call. I believe personally, that would be a mistake. Now, if the person says they want to give again because they've never had someone call them and thank them so quickly, you don't want to stand in the way of that gift by any stretch. If someone wants to give, you help them make that gift. Ideally, you should ask for permission to follow up with them. Maybe you want to schedule another meeting to learn more about their interests, or maybe you don't even want to want to schedule something at that time. It depends on your style. The important thing is, you're asking for permission to continue the dialogue. Then, if we go backwards in the slide, the thought is, so you've ended that phone call. You've hung up. Now, what do you do? You email the donor right away about the stuff that they're interested in. Darryl, in your case, I know we're running up on time, what brought you to work at the social service Oregon food pantry, where you volunteer. I guess work is not the right word but brought you volunteer? Darryl: Yes. Actually, the local business that we had, had heard that they were doing a gift drive for kids that were in need during the Christmas season in our community. That was just something that our company decided that they wanted to get involved in. The more that I ended up learning about the organization, a few years later, I ended up wanting to become a board member for it. Ryan: In this scenario, we had a discussion. We talked about the Christmas drive for kids. I would imagine there's probably other things that the organization does for children specifically. Darryl: Oh, totally. They offer full case management. They're helping to feed the homeless or those that are disadvantaged at this point. All of the work that they were doing, surrounded that one experience that I ended up hearing about, and it just completely strengthened the reasons why I wanted to help support that organization. Ryan: Then, in this case, hypothetically, I called you. We spoke. You talked about the Christmas drive, and you talked about the fact that it was really helpful for these children. I'd probably follow up in an email and share more information about the different work that's going on to help the youth of the community. After that, I would either schedule a time to meet. I'd reach back out. I might send in that email, "Hey, I'm going to call you at this time," just to let them know the call's coming to try and schedule a meeting, or maybe you try to schedule a meeting via email afterwards. That's a separate touch than the follow-up to say, "Hey, here's relevant information about how we help the youth in the community." You schedule that meeting, then you meet a second time. Afterwards, you send a more specific follow-up email saying, "Thank you for your time and your interest. I want to highlight the different parts of the organization that were really interesting to you and areas where you might want to make an impact." Then lastly, you ask for permission to meet again. At that meeting that you end up having, you should have a gift proposal ready. You should have an ask amount plan. Don't ever go into and ask without understanding a number. Along the way there's questions you can ask that aren't included here, which are, what are the three organizations that are most important to you, and why, and what kind of a relationship do you have with them? They'll probably tell you about some of the large gifts they've made so that you can understand what numbers they have been comfortable with historically. That also doesn't mean that you shouldn't ask for more if it feels natural. The whole thing is on some level, it should feel natural. In some cases, the ask is very, very easy. The ask shouldn't be hard if you understand what they like and what they want to accomplish philanthropically. You make the ask. That's it. We're supposed to have more time for questions, aren't we? I couldn't shut up. I'm long-winded. Darryl: That's okay. I think [unintelligible 00:59:49] the feedback that I'm getting from a lot of this is that it's a really good session. I want to be careful and mindful of the closing remarks. I do see that there's one question out there that I think is super relevant to this and this question is to whether or not is it okay if it comes from a board member rather than a staff member and I'll even take a stab at answering that? Because I found that in our community our board members are better known than the person that we ended up hiring as the Director of Development and when we had our board member ask for a $10,000 gift, it was a much easier gift to receive than it was if it would've come from a relatively new Director of Development so I think both are very valid, but there's a whole process in Board Development that we could talk about that surrounds major gifts and that's a session onto itself but Ryan, I think this was some great material on relationships. I'm just going to double-check our Q&A here to see if we've missed any and we'll try to follow up. There is a document that should be attached to this session at this point in time and then there's a specific donor search question so if you've got anything else that you wanted to quickly ask here to top off this session and that-- Do we have one more slide left? I wasn't sure if you needed to-- Donna: We do, it was about how to track a major gift in DonorPerfect. Ryan: Oh, yes. Donna: Yes, we were talking about when the gift actually comes in, what you would do to be able to track that and make that contact information so that you could reach out to that donor. I don't know whether we have time to do it now, unfortunately, because I know folks want to get to the closing remarks or the last presentation, but it's really creating a contact record and if you go to, I am going to say something. If you go into DonorPerfect, you'll notice [inaudible 01:01:39] now that new [inaudible 01:01:39] scheduled donor outreach. This is going to be your best friend. This is the way that you're going to be able to keep abreast of, who you need to be contacting and when you can track all of this information right here in the scheduled donor outreach when you create a contact record in DonorPerfect. Do we have time to go just a little bit, just about two minutes or shall I end it here? Darryl: What I'm thinking Donna is there a session in tomorrow's, program that might actually touch on some of this contact material? It's my [unintelligible 01:02:12] Donna: Not at all. Darryl: Okay. Then-- Donna: Not with me. Not that I'm aware of, but we can certainly if someone wants to-- I think we can schedule meetings with us, if you want to do that, I'm happy to go through that possibility with you. If someone wants to schedule a meeting, if you just go to the person's profile, you can ask to schedule a meeting and I believe as the speakers, you can schedule a meeting with me. If you'd like that, I'd be happy to help out. Darryl: Great. Yes and trust me, we've got your feedback and I can see there being and I'm core presentation to this that we may be offering so keep an eye on your email, even post-conference. This is the first time that we've been able to pull all of this content together and my tremendous thanks to Ryan and Donna for doing an excellent job in this content and looking forward to doing some more. Thank you all and we'll see you all at the closing remarks for today. Donna: See you later. Thanks so much. Thank you, Ryan. Ryan: Thanks, everyone. Thanks, Donna. Bye. Donna: Keep those relationships going. Bye. [pause 01:03:17] [01:03:51] [END OF AUDIO]

What’s New and Next in DonorPerfect

What's New + Next: How DonorPerfect Will Accelerate Your Growth in 2022.

What’s New and Next in DonorPerfect

Description

What's New + Next: How DonorPerfect Will Accelerate Your Growth in 2022. See all-new DonorPerfect Donation Forms, built to help you convert more online gifts. You will also see how to set up a personalized home page, how to send and save emails with your preferred email program, and learn how advanced data enrichment with DonorPerfect Insights can improve your segmentation and messaging. And get a sneak peek at what’s coming next from the DonorPerfect team!

Transcript

[background noise] Amanda Tadrzynski: All right. Well, welcome everyone to our what's new, what's next in DonorPerfect panel discussion. I'm Amanda Tadrzynski, and I'm going to be your moderator for today. As a reminder, if you guys have any questions that you would like addressed during the Q&A portion at the end of this presentation, you can go ahead and pop those questions into the Q&A section. If you just want to share your thoughts or that you're really excited about a new feature, then you can pop that into the chat box. For today's session, we are going to be focusing on some recent and upcoming enhancements to DonorPerfect that's going to improve how you set strategic goals and how you engage with your constituents in a more personal and transformational way. I'm joined by the members of our product management teams who will be highlighting those enhancements. Before I start off with those hard hitting questions, I'm going to go ahead and let them introduce themselves, starting with Josh Colbert. Josh Colbert: Hey everybody. My name's Josh Colbert, as Amanda just said. I've been with Donor Perfect for just under five years and I manage our online donation forms products. [unintelligible 00:01:57] I did say products. We have a new and exciting online donation forms product that I'm really excited to preview for you today. Amanda: All right. We also have Evan Doyle. Evan Doyle: Hey everyone. I've been [unintelligible 00:02:10] with DonorPerfect for over a decade now and still, every year I'm really energized by this conference. I really appreciate the sacrifice of time that you guys have all made to be here with us. I really appreciate the privilege of being able to work in such an amazing sector. Amanda: Last but certainly not least, Josh Nelson. Josh Nelson: Hello everyone. I am really excited to be here as the last, but certainly not least, product manager. I've been with DonorPerfect for 13 years. The DonorPerfect conference has a special place for me as a former host of the event. I'm really excited for everyone to come again this year to hear all the great things that we've been able to do for you and with you in DonorPerfect. Looking forward to the session with you. Amanda: All right, and Josh, you're going to get our first question for today. Many of our clients have expressed how important it is for them to be able to see how they're doing at a glance in terms of different fundraising metrics from donor retention, to the overall revenue that they've raised. How can DonorPerfect help our clients reflect on their fundraising performance so that they can identify opportunities and goals to take their fundraising to the next level? Nelson: Great question, Amanda. Next slide. We heard from many customers that they were struggling to see progress on their overall fundraising goal. How much are we raising according to what we're trying to achieve? They wanted to see trends and compare their progress to last year and they wanted to keep their board updated. Real quick, I'm going to take a 30 second pause. It looks like everyone, Amanda, can see the notes and not the slides. I'm not sure if we can quickly fix the presentation view. Amanda: Yes, we can. Give me one second to just correct that real quick and I apologize for that. All right. Let me just change that here. Nelson: As product people in technology, we expect the unexpected and are ready to do the dance at any time, but I'll continue here. While we work on the slides-- Perfect, Amanda, right on time. Well done. These are some of the challenges that you have shared with us. One of our favorite things to do is to partner with our customers, to hear your feedback, to understand your challenges that you're having, whether it's with DonorPerfect, some features you want, or whether it's in the industry. You're trying to solve your fundraising problems and challenges. This is some of the feedback that you told us. I need to turn off the general chat, because you're all making me laugh. You're hilarious. Go ahead and go to the next slide. It all starts with your annual goal. Simply enter how much you're trying to raise and DonorPerfect will keep track of your progress throughout the year, right from your organizational dashboard. You can find that by going to the reports menu and simply clicking on dashboard. Next slide. Here are five key performance indicators or some of the most important metrics you can simply measure with one click access over the different areas of your fundraising for the last 12 months. Each particular metric will show you where you're at currently. For example, growth in giving is at 13% over last year, and it's going to show you just how much you've either increased or decreased year over year compared to this time last year. You can see in this particular example, growth in giving is up $70,000 compared to where you were last year. This is actually taken from a live customer. It's anonymous. You don't know who it is, but I want just to represent something here, that the data says everything looks good. Right at the top, you can clearly see all up into the right metrics. That's what we want to see. However, this particular organization has been doing what seems to be everything right. They've been thanking almost 96% of their donors as soon as they get the gift. One of the things that they changed this last year is they implemented a monthly giving program in a way to really grow it. They've doubled down on that and what that did, is it brought down their average gift amount because now instead of giving maybe one or two larger gifts throughout the year, they're getting 12 smaller gifts, but more over the course of the year, which we know drives up donor retention and drives up lifetime value. You often have to dig one layer deeper, but we make that easy from the one-click access within DonorPerfect. Next slide. Here are two trends of the most important metrics to zoom in a little bit to see how have we been-- or out rather, how have we been doing over the last 24 months? It's great to see that, say, my growth in giving or donor retention rate is this today, but how have we been progressing throughout the year and over last year as well. Well, we made it really simple for you to quickly see your trend this year compared to last year and how you've been progressing. It gives you a much better idea on how you're doing with your transformational fundraising efforts than just your current KPIs. Lastly, one of the trends that we've seen as well as food banks especially, throughout the pandemic, is an influx of new donors looking to help their community through the hard times. It's such an amazing thing that we get to watch, is, the overall generosity of donors rising up and stepping in to partner with you to meet the need in your communities. Well, one of the things that this shows is there's this giant influx of new donors last year and retained and reactivated were about the same compared to the previous year. However, this particular organization didn't do a great job of engaging those new donors, understanding who they are in order to keep them. Time will tell whether or not they were a good fit, whether it was an episodic donation, but one of the things that Evan is going to share next is how to better understand your new donors, especially, as you're receiving them and knowing how to put a face to the name so that you can prevent this from happening to you too. Amanda: All right. Well, thank you, Josh Nelson. We've got lots of great gifts going in the chat for people who are loving all of that different data points. Evan, knowing that we have to increase donor retention or knowing that we want to focus on increasing our average gift amount, is it enough? Because to be able to improve upon those KPIs, we have to begin to understand who our audience is. Can you tell us a bit more about donor insights and how that data can help our clients get to know their donors and make that shift to a more transformational fundraising focus? Evan: Yes. Absolutely. Thanks, Amanda. Every organization is unique in their mission and their approach to making the world a better place, but so is the makeup of their supporters. Throughout the conference, you've heard a lot about how much things have changed in terms of donor behavior, as well as how the sector overall has had to pivot and adapt. You've also heard some great data as far as the increase in retention of those first-time donors, those new donors. We really believe that a lot of that has to do with the shift towards more transformational fundraising, but there are challenges that we've seen for a long time that this difficult time has highlighted even more. We want to make sure that we can make it a little bit easier for our clients to connect with their supporters and each other to build those sustainable transformational relationships. That's really been the inspiration for DP Insights. Before I talk about our small part in the solution, there are some obstacles that we see teams facing today, siloed teams, staff turnover, and really, transactional data being the only reliable data that they have. Just like many for-profit organizations, nonprofits can suffer from silos that make it hard to leverage the information that you already have [unintelligible 00:12:10] Marketing and communications have their own view and their own priorities, development has theirs, program staff have theirs and so on. This can really create disjointed experiences for current and future supporters. Staff turnover is always a challenge, but we have become even more problematic during the pandemic as we've really seen that rate of turnover increase and really impacting organization's ability to grow. This is especially impactful when the information isn't centralized and doesn't live-- and actually just lives in the heads of the people. If you were able to attend Meredith Sossman's session yesterday, she talked a lot about the importance of getting interactions with donors logged in the database and the continuity this helps build. Josh is going to talk a little bit more about how we can make that a little bit easier, but this leaves many teams with a lot of transactional data, but not much else. This can really make it overwhelming to even know where to start. Who should you be focused on? How can you make the most of what you already have and have a better way to prioritize and connect with your supporters? Next slide, Amanda. In other words, how do we go from here to there? With DP Insights, we're going to take that basic contact information you get from maybe that first time donor and help turn it into a person. We're able to do this with identity resolution and data augmentation technology. This takes potentially different versions of that person and pulls it all together. If you look me up on LinkedIn, my information is going to be different there than maybe what you find in my voter registration or what I've put into my most recent online donation to your organization, but with the right technology, we can pull that all together and enrich it with as many as 1200 additional data points of publicly available information for people within the United States. What could take hours of researching and interpreting various signals that you might find about a donor, that can really be done at scale to help jumpstart your prioritization [inaudible 00:14:19] Once that is done at the individual level, we can pull that all together with a report that just really summarizes your constituencies. If you attended Tuesday's session with Lou Bruggman and Kelly [unintelligible 00:14:35] they went into detail about the importance of understanding your audience and the priorities using personas. This summary view can really be used to help bridge the gap between teams and help new members of the team more quickly understand your constituency. Understanding your existing supporters and tailoring your approach even slightly can really make a huge difference. Every time that I've looked at one of these reports, it's been amazing to see how different the breakdown of an organization's constituency is, even in just their basic demographics, their education levels, their generational breakdown, the predicted likelihood of response to various types of communication, and really using this as a rallying point for teams to really get on the same page of who they're trying to reach. Next slide. With DP Insights, we're also going to append each individual record within DonorPerfect with over 30 attributes that are both descriptive and predictive, leveraging those 1200 points of publicly available data I was talking about earlier. This lets us take that big data and really make it actionable. With that information right within DonorPerfect, you can do lots of things with the standard reporting and filtering that you're already used to using today. Some quick examples of that would be like using the top donor listing report and sorting it by the predicted giving capacity or wealth rating from DP Insights and comparing that to the performance of what they've been giving to recently or over their lifetime. This example, if you can see, we've got some potential under-performers at the top there that might be good prospects to hand over to someone to try to dig in a little bit and have more personal touch with to understand their motivations and build that relationship a little bit more personally. More of a macro level when we're looking at the bottom area, you can see that this particular organization has over 90% of their fundraising revenue coming from baby boomers. This is really going to be a wake-up call to really identify that we really need a new strategy. We need a strategy to attract that next generation of supporters. Go ahead and go to the next slide. With this information, you can really make more intentional and strategic decisions and plans to attract, retain and grow the bond between you and your constituents and with giving Tuesday right around the corner, we expect our clients to see a lot of new donors, but with those new donors, how would you approach them differently if you knew just a little bit more about them as people? There's a lot more than I could say about this, but we have a lot more to cover. I did want to note that we really wanted to make this a cost-effective solution for our clients. We understand that budgets are tight and this is something that we're basing it off of the package we have at DonorPerfect. If you have any questions, you can reach out to me or any of your account managers, but everybody that's attending the conference today, our clients are going to get a 20% discount if you are interested in the subscription. Amanda: All right, thank you so much, Evan. Now we're going to turn it over to Josh Nelson. Tell us about some ways that donor perfect can help our clients engage with their constituents and show their gratitude for their donations. Nelson: Absolutely. Thank you, Amanda. You can go to the next slide. You're never going to break the cycle of transactional fundraising when this is the message and the only time your donors hear from you when you're saying, "Will you give another gift?" It's time to give again." Or, "We need your money." We all know this to be true, but in order to shift it to a transformational relationship that you have over the course of their lifetime, we're going to all have to start spending more time saying this, "Thank you for your generosity. Here's the impact we're having together on our shared mission." Fundraisers who are expressing that sincere gratitude as close to the time where they received the gift are seeing transformational results as well. Next slide. Here are a few ways that we're helping you express your sincere gratitude from within DonorPerfect right now. One of the things that we did is to help you personalize your thank yous right from the donors record. Now you can personalize each thank you for the checks and over the phone donations you're entering by simply at the time you're entering the gift, simply click thank donor, and whether it's email or letter, you can personalize the information right within DonorPerfect, and add a little note, ask them about how their kids are doing at the start of school or you get it, you're the experts. We've made it really simple for you to streamline your thank you because what we've seen is as you thank your donors, at the time that you enter the gift, you can see upwards of 60% donor retention and just waiting one day will reduce that impact that you're going to have on your donors. We've made it simple for you to simply click thank you right away, as soon as you enter the gift, in order to drive your donor retention up. The next thing up for you is helping you build your lifelong donor relationships with a new BCC email integration right from within DonorPerfect. Now you'll be able to track all of your emails you're sending to, or receiving from donors, right from within Gmail or Outlook or any other email service provider. Simply save your emails by forwarding them, if you receive a donor reply, you can forward it right to DonorPerfect. We will store that email history so that you no longer have a moment where you're going, "Hey, where did you leave off with your conversation with that donor?" "I know we were talking about something or other-- what was that again?" You can pick up right where your colleague left off to prevent either redundant outreach, so you all can seem like you're on the same page, and you can know what the conversations were about. You have that history. It's not just stored in someone's inbox. This will help you make your next donor conversation personal and relevant. The next feature, oh, and last note about that, we are currently in beta testing and so this is currently limited access for those customers who have joined the beta program. It will be released later this year. Look for more information about that. Okay. Sorry. The next feature that we have is one thing that I'm super excited about, back a slide, that is-- we've got some gremlins here in the slide deck, is making an impact through your wonderful smile. What we did is we did a virtual conference so that you can see our face. It was as close to the real deal as you can get, but we realize you can't always have a Zoom. We're all full of Zoom fatigue, but what we made it simple is right from the donor's record, you can send a personalized video, which wows your donors and helps you build rapport with your smile. It increases open rates of your emails tremendously. Donors who receive a video email are more likely to open it. If they're opening it, they're getting your message, you're breaking through the noise and you're able to get your sincere gratitude felt in a way that's different than a text, an email or even a phone call. Our friends at CauseVid have partnered with us to bring it to you at half the cost of retail price. There's a free trial right within your system. You can simply click send video, give it a try, send me an email or a video and I'd love to send you one back. If your hair doesn't look so good today like mine and you're not really ready yet, even though you just got the gift, you want to quickly send a thank you, we've done something because we realize you're not able to send it in the moment every time. The last thing I have for you is the next slide, and that is this. We've made it possible for you to simply schedule a future outreach, whether you're using our smart actions feature to automatically add this for you to say, on every Friday, when you finally fix your hair and you look great, we're making it easy for you to schedule future donor outreach so that you can send that video or phone call or email or handwritten note that you intend to do, never miss a deadline. Right from the homepage, we're making it possible for you to have right in front of you, every time you log in, your one-on-one donor communication. This brand new feature rolled out earlier this year, hopefully all of you are checking this out, but right there, you can either mark it as done. You can go to the donor record or the contact, and we're putting some of those key stats so that you can personalize your communication with your donors. Those are just some of the ways this year that we've improved your ability to express your gratitude with your donors, and we're looking forward to hearing your feedback on how you enjoy those features. Amanda: Thank you, Josh Nelson. Lots of great chatter in the chat. People are really excited about everything that you just showed. We all know how important online donations are. They're a fast and easy way for our donors to support our cause. I'm going to turn it over to Josh Colbert so he can talk a bit about the new online donation forms. Colbert: Awesome. Thanks, Amanda. You can go ahead and jump to the next slide. Great to be here. Thanks, everyone. In terms of donor engagement and communication, we found that online appeals are one of the cheapest and easiest and also the most efficient ways to meet your donors where they are, your prospective donors, and allow them to learn about your mission and support it on their terms. Sending out a professional high converting donation form and inviting your donors to complete it is really a fantastic way to get the word to a lot of people, whether they've donated before or whether they're potential first-time donors. I think the challenge is, we're not the only industry that believes that. In fact, in 2021, almost everyone in every industry is courting their donors online. The key is how do you cut through the noise and make your organization and your story stand out. We believe that the answer is to create an online giving experience that's really frictionless and easy to complete, but also creates a strong emotional connection, so someone feels that they have to give. Given the importance of online fundraising in today's times, we decided to reimagine and revamp our donation forms with these concepts in mind. I'm really excited to preview what we've got for you today. Amanda, you can jump to the next slide, please. You've heard about this throughout this conference, throughout today, and even throughout this session, but with most things related to fundraising in 2021, the transformational fundraising plays a really large role in fundraising success. It's become clear that making donors feel connected to your mission on an ongoing basis is the right way to strike the right tone and create an emotional connection and really an alignment to your cause. This means treating giving more personally, and like Josh said, not just asking for money and also taking the time to ensure that your donors understand the impact their gift makes and why they should be giving at several different giving levels, several different levels of impact. Not just trying to get them to buy and click a submit button, but trying to get them to really understand what giving a little bit more accomplishes or giving on a monthly basis accomplishes. Transformational fundraising also means prioritizing long-term relationships before the gift, during the giving experience and after the gift. Give them the post-donation experience. We'll talk a little bit about how to make that confirmation email exciting, informational and motivating as opposed to just the boring and cold tax receipt. Now I'm ready for the next slide, Amanda. One of the things that I want to show here and you can see in the video here of the drag and drop, but what we've got here with our re-imagining form builder, unlike our past forms products, is just that. A drag and drop, what you see is what you get type of form builder. Why is that important? Well, we feel like it's imperative that you're able to easily design a form that's easy to complete for your donor base. By being able to see what that donor experience is while you're building the form, it really increases your chances of building a frictionless form and understanding what the donor experience is going to be so that you can tweak it before we press publish and share. Let's jump to the next slide and see some more. Sticking with the form-building concept, part of making a frictionless donation process is really understanding your donor base and the ranges in which they're giving capacity lies. You may find that your donors perhaps [unintelligible 00:29:22] give a lot of smaller gifts or maybe you have donors who give on average, your donor base tends to give a little bit of a larger gift range. Understanding that range and being able to set it on your form is really important. What you can see here in this video, if you look at those top two giving levels, is we made it really easy to change the giving levels on your form and see what it looks like in real-time. If I initially had $5 and $10 set, and I want to change those top two levels to $10 and $20, I can accomplish that within seconds, within a couple of keystrokes. Those changes are made in real-time so that I don't need to wonder that those changes take place or what they look like on my form. I can make the changes on the left side of the panel, and I can see them in real-time on the right side of the panel. We think that's pretty exciting. Let's see what else we've got on the next slide. I talked a little bit about frictionless giving. As I mentioned earlier, part of what makes your new form important is the ability to tell your organization's story on the form itself, really create that emotional connection [unintelligible 00:30:21] where someone feels like they really have to give. In this case, you can use our descriptive text from the left-hand panel to drag that a little bit of a story onto your forms canvas. That's what you see there in that top portion on the right side of the screen, is, the organization is told the story about Paws & Claws. They're explaining to their donors about what happens if they're not able to secure enough donations, what happens to those animals. Just as importantly, what's the impact that the donation or donations can make and really using convincing emotional language on the form itself at the point of decision to convey to donors where and how they should be donating and how much they should be donating. We find there's a lot of industry data that suggested that that's a really compelling way to get donors to give and give again. It's not just about that descriptive text, what you can see in those actual giving levels in the $10, $20, $30, and $50 amounts is there's actually a short little story attached with each giving level. Again, there's a lot of industry data that suggests that when you talk about that emotional connection and compelling storytelling actually explaining what each giving level accomplishes is a great way to get donors to donate, and not just to donate, but actually to donate more. The text on this screen unfortunately is a little bit small. We can send out some copies, but what you can see from the difference between $20 a month and $30 a month is that, in this case, the organization is actually able to supply additional blankets, leashes, and collars for each animal. If you're a pet lover and you understand that giving $20 might give daily meals and a bed and heck, for an extra $10 a month, you you can provide blankets, leashes, and collars, that really helps to create that emotional connection with a donor to say, "Hey, I was going to give $20 a month, but in this case, I understand the value that's being created by giving $30 a month right there on the form, and I'm going to choose the $30 option." There's a lot of exciting evidence that that type of storytelling really motivates donors to give and upgrade their gifts. Let's see what else is there on the next side. Of course, as great as one-time donations are, Josh talked to monthly donations, we found are even more powerful and more valuable to all of our organizations. It's great that you're able to tell your donors what each giving level accomplishes so they can decide on the monthly impact they want to create, but one of the challenges, when we look at this kind of toggle screen going back and forth, is-- I don't know about you, but for myself and most donors, most donors don't have the ability to give $250 or $100 or in some cases even $50 a month, but they want to create that recurring impact. When you think about a frictionless giving experience, we create functionality on our online form where the donor can actually toggle and see lower, more palatable, more appropriate levels on a monthly basis. Again, if I only do want to give once, maybe those, $25, $50, $100, $250 options are the right for me, but if I want to give monthly, I see more welcoming, lower, again, more palatable amounts and so when I look at that, I don't feel like a $20 gift is going to be too low. I see that it's going to be appreciated by my organization. We found that there's a lot of evidence that those types of things really compel donors to give, and in this case, make a monthly gift seem more inviting, and that's really important. Let's jump to the next slide and have a look at what the final form looks like. We've got a little video scroll here, and what you can see is, this is a nice, tight, compact form. There's not a ton of scrolling, which is good. There's not a ton of random space between the fields. You've got the monthly toggle, you've got a story told at each donation level and you've got a really nice, easy form to complete. We feel like that's a really compelling way to motivate your donors and get them through that giving process quickly. That's exciting. Next slide. Then the last slide I talked about earlier is, it's not just about the giving experience, it's about the post-giving experience. We can see at the top of this thank you email here is I've included a nice image of one of the kitty cats that's being helped. I'm able to tell a story in my thank you email, really a nice, compelling story. Not only that, but in this case, I'm actually able to link out to other information. It's not just about the bottom part of that page, that tax receipt, but it's about the story on the top half. There's a lot of information there. There's also a link that if the donor didn't give on a monthly basis, they can click there and learn more about the monthly giving program. That's obviously exciting and valuable as well. Let's jump to the next slide. When we think about personalization and completing the loop, the giving experience is great, but when we really want to nail a personalized thank you, and Josh referred to this earlier, some of the value of the online form here is that those donations end up automatically in your CRM in DonorPerfect. Based on certain conditions that you can set, when certain donations hit your CRM, it can actually trigger smart actions. It can send out a personalized thank you and perhaps one of those personalized video thank-yous that was talked about earlier, so you really give your donor that nice personal touch. Just another way to increase the warmth of the giving experience and not make it feel as transactional and more transformational. Let's jump to the last time. Hopefully, I've given you a good flavor of what's in our donation forms product. There's a lot more to come, a lot that we're excited about. With this revamp, there's some functionality coming down the pipe that I wanted to get you excited about as well. We are going to be adding the donors covers cost functionality that allows your donors to fulfill and ensure that their intended donation actually reaches your mission by allowing them to add a little bit of an additional donation to match and meet your processing fees and help to help to offset those processing fees. Thinking about transformational fundraising, improved record matching. Nothing is worse than having tons of duplicates where you're not able to completely understand who your donors are, and you've got two or three or four Josh Colberts. That doesn't make a donor feel very warm at all. You can't even tell that there's more than one of Josh in the database, so we're going to be improving the record matching of donations that come from the online form into the DonorPerfect CRM. Sticking with the theme of emotional connections, we know that basically about a third of gifts are made in honor or memory of someone. Tribute gifts are really important and so we're excited to add tribute functionality to this product. Then these last two bullets here are something that don't exist in our current forms product, but we're excited to add to this product. One is an enhancement to our monthly giving functionality. We talked about monthly giving a lot now, but one of the things that, again, we try and rely on data and evidence, and there's a lot of evidence that suggests this monthly giving prompt or push or nudge, just if we call it, is really impactful. What we're building into the forms right now is if someone does go through the process and wants to give on a one-time basis, let's say they want to give $100, the form will actually send them a little note, not too invasive, not too obtrusive, but basically be able to say, "Okay, it's great, we appreciate your $100 gift, but would you consider giving $10 a month? It's going to go much further for our organization. Please consider doing so." That's a functionality we're excited to add to help to, along with that toggle, really show donors how valuable and how easy it is to give on a monthly basis. Then the last thing we're working on right now, there's much more beyond this, but the thing that I want to tease a little bit that we're excited to deliver is actually an integration with PayPal where donors will be able to pay with their PayPal accounts, as opposed to just credit cards. That's something we've heard for a while and we're excited to deliver in this new forms product. As I just said, there's actually much more coming down through the pipeline than just these five bullets, but these are some of the most immediate things that we're going to be adding to the products you saw today, and we're really excited to deliver them to you. Hopefully, you're excited and happy to answer any questions when we get there. Thanks, Amanda. Amanda: Thank you. Before I let you go because there is one common question that is coming up. Colbert: Sure. Amanda: When can people expect to get access to these forms? Everyone wants to know. Colbert: Okay, great. This product's live today. I can't see the IDs. I do see we've got several hundred clients in this session. This product is live and processing money today. What I'd say is you can get in touch with us, you can get in touch with either your customer relations specialists or if you're not currently processing with us, obviously we need to set up a payment [unintelligible 00:38:39] perhaps your AM rep. I'm certainly happy to share my information as well, but the answer to the question is that this product is available for any DonorPerfect client today compared to what some of our clients are using. You may find that you may be wanting to use it before we add some of these bullets. You may want to wait until we have some of these things that donors covers cost contributes. That's really your choice, but we're happy to turn this product on for anyone who's interested right away and allow them to make that decision for themselves. Amanda: Thank you. All right. Moving into then what's coming next for DonorPerfect. A couple slides ago, Josh Nelson had talked about the annual giving metric, which allows us to see an overall fundraising goal, but a lot of people were writing into the chat, "What if I want to set a goal for a particular campaign, solicitation, general ledger?" Evan, you want to tell us a little bit about those future enhancements coming to the dashboard? Evan: Yes, absolutely. Part of what also what Josh talked about was some of the changes we've made to the new homepage, hopefully, whether it's you yourself that have that type of direct interaction with constituents, and donors, you're able to take advantage of that, or at least whoever at your organization does is able to do that. We're really excited about the next addition to the homepage that we're going to be adding sometime in November. We know that that big annual goal is really made up of a lot of smaller goals throughout the year. We want to make it easier for you to be able to keep track of those, keep your team aligned around those goals and just really quickly and easily be able to check in on your progress. You can see here that the next thing we're going to be doing is giving you the ability to add those different goals that are a little bit smaller as part of that overall goal. If you go to the next slide, Amanda. Once you click on that creat goal, it's going to give you the option to set that up. You're just going to be able to name it, set the amount of the goal, set the timeframe for what gifts within what timeframe you want to be included in that. You can see a little bit down towards the bottom, you're going to be able to choose which gift codes you'd want to be included for that particular goal. Based on general ledger codes, campaign codes, solicitation codes, or sub-solicitation codes, and have multiple codes all together. If your organization has a GivingTuesday, or an end-of-year campaign goal coming up, this is going to be something that in November, hopefully, we'll be able to get out to everybody and you'll be able to start taking advantage of that. If you go to the next. Yes, there you go. Once you've created that goal, this is what you're going to see on your homepage if you have access to this feature. Right above the scheduled donor outreach and you're going to be able to see it's just a snapshot of your progress, so how many gifts you've received from how many different stake donors, recent activity on that goal. Really, again, just a way for you and your organization to stay more aligned around those short, medium-term goals. Amanda: All right, thank you, Evan. Now I'm going to turn it over to Josh Nelson so he can tell us a little bit about the whole household functionality that will be coming soon. Nelson: Did you just say household functionality. My goodness, this is incredible news. I can't tell you how excited I am to be announcing a preview of improved households within DonorPerfect. At the end of the day, personalized relationships with people are some of the most important aspects of your relationship building, but it's not just the individual on the other end of the line, it's who they're in relationship with. Because you know and I know that it's much more than just speaking to a person, but making sure that you understand who they belong with. Today, I'm here to announce for the first time in DonorPerfect history an improvement to households. Go ahead and let's show them on the next slide. Here is a preview of some work in progress that we have going on with a brand new experience in terms of creating individuals in DonorPerfect with a first name as a first name, and a last name as a last name so that all of your individuals can have their individual attributes, such as email and cell phone, and you can organize your individuals into a household. Whether they're a couple or a spouse, you can organize them into their households so that you can reduce costs with one mailing per household, you can figure out your giving by individual as well as collectively as a household so that when you're reaching out, you can figure out this information. Next slide. That was a preview of creating the household. On our way to making sure that you can get that picturesque house in Iceland that I found online, here's a quick preview in terms of what the household record may look like. Some quick information about who the household is, how they want to be recognized, as well as the individual members of the household, how much each person has given as well as what the total is, and then some information below about how you are going to address them. You're all making me laugh, so it's hard to keep my composure with all of your GIFs. Keep it coming, it's good to bump me up. As well as all the address information. You can have a nice clean salutation in the dealer line as well as your address label well organized. We're just as excited as you are, this has been some work in progress for our team. We should have a preview for feedback a little bit later this year so that if you're really interested, certainly ask about it. Any member of our team can direct you to me and I'd be happy to get you in touch with our team in order to give us additional feedback about what your specific use cases are, what the needs are for your team. You're all making the laugh, so I got to stop looking. There's one more thing here, Amanda, about how customers can give feedback and get connected with us. One of my and my team's passions is making sure that we understand your ideas. Right from within DonorPerfect, you can go to Suggest and Vote which is our community site, which Lauren talked to you a little bit earlier today. That's where you can simply submit your ideas, upvote other ideas and support those that you think are most important to you and the organization, as well as that usability feedback community group. Once you're in community, there's a quick screenshot under discuss, you can talk with community members and join the usability testing group. That's where we're usually announcing features, asking for beta testers, and getting your feedback with interviews and other ways that you can try get early access to the feature, try it out, let us know what you think, and then shape it with us. Make sure it meets your needs. That's one of our favorite parts of the job, is hearing from you, listening to you, and incorporating those ideas and turning them into the DonorPerfect you know and love, as well as the one we're working on next. I just want to say thanks to everyone before we get into the question and answer for putting up with us for this long. I'm looking forward to hearing what you think as well as answering other questions you have. Amanda: All right, thank you, Josh Nelson, and I am [inaudible 00:47:35] All right, let me add everyone to the stream before I start talking. All right, we're going to open it up to some questions then and we have lots of great ones in here. Evan: I'm guessing that much excitement about anything in a long time, look at all that. Look at all those GIFs and excitement about households. Amanda: Those GIFs are making me laugh. [laughs] Evan: Yes. Amanda: All right, so Donna has a question about households. She's asking, would this be considered as one donor record, or will they be considered as two separate records? Specifically thinking about that donor record count piece. Nelson: The way that we've been thinking about that is that it would be one household in terms of counting towards your donor records, and then you could add each individual, whether it's 1 to 12 members of the household within that organization or within that household record. The short answer is a count of one for one household. Amanda: All right, and are households going to be able to work with companies and employees with multiple locations as well or is it just for individual records? Nelson: I love our customers, this is great. That's exactly what we've been talking about, but the first milestone we're trying to make sure we solve are individuals within their individual household. We're going to start there, solve that problem really well with you, make sure it's working for you, and then we can move on to the next phase, which would be the organization, and then all the contacts under that. Amanda: All right, and last household question. Is there going to be an easy way to transfer from what our clients already have in terms of setup to the household functionality when it's launched? Nelson: The best part of our job is we get to say, of course, because it doesn't exist yet. People much smarter than us are able to build something that could do that. We can lean on our great team and say when we get to that point in terms of getting you from where you're at now to where you want to be with the new household functionality, we're going to make sure that we provide the ability for you to convert your existing data into the new format. We don't know what that's going to look like yet because it doesn't exist, but we're certainly recognizing that we're going to need to help you along that path. That's one of our favorite parts is to be able to partner with you to make sure that that works well for you, so yes. Amanda: All right, thank you. Josh Colbert, we got lots of questions about online forms. Colbert: Great. Amanda: The first one being, will these new forms be able to be embedded on our website? Colbert: Yes, I do see a lot of questions in the chat around that and the answer is yes. We do have several clients that have embedded their forms in IFrames now. Those pages and transactions are working well. Yes, the answer is absolutely. Amanda: All right, and a few people can ask, could you clarify how they can get access to the form product again? Is it something that's live that they can get put on to right now? Colbert: Yes, it is live. It is something that we can turn on for you. I saw a couple of comments. It's something that we need to turn on for you because it's in its beta phase. I saw someone saying that they're searching for it. It's not going to be live without us turning it on for you. We would ask you to reach out to us. You can reach out to your, like I said, your customer relations specialist. Most likely it's probably the best person to reach out to start and they can help you get access. We're happy to turn on anyone who wants to be turned on for the beta product, but it is something that we're going to ask you to reach out to us for so we can activate it for you. It's not going to be in your system if you're looking right now at 1:21 PM Eastern. That's the best way and we'll be happy to get you activated ASAP. Amanda: All right, and everyone's really excited because you said the words PayPal- Colbert: I did see that as well. Amanda: - in a presentation. People want to know if the PayPal integration is live. Also, are we thinking about accepting Venmo as a payment method as well? Colbert: Sure, yes. PayPal integration is not yet live. That's still a little bit away, something we're developing. Not too, too far away, but that's not going to be live today. As far as Venmo and Apple Pay and Google Pay, those things are all payment types that we're very actively evaluating and pursuing. PayPal is by far the furthest along. That's something that we're, like I said, really not too far off of. Then Venmo and some other types will be coming hopefully sooner than later. Amanda: Awesome. Then people are asking about tributes, so can you confirm, are tributes coming to the form, and when can we expect to see them? Colbert: The donors' covers cost and tribute functionality are being, at this point, actively worked on. They're further along than being this discovery work done or doing more research. We're always doing research. Both those pieces of functionality are being actively developed by our teams right now both attributes as well as the donors covering the processing fees. It's hard for us to know with exact certainty exactly when they'll be ready, but I'm pretty bullish that both have a pretty good chance to get released this year. Amanda: All right, and last online forum question I'm going to ask of you at the moment. Will clients have the capability to turn off or on the monthly giving toggle? Colbert: Yes, that's something that, if you want to use, we'll certainly welcome your ability to use it. We recognize it may not be for everybody, and so if someday you're not as interested in using, that's okay. What I'll say about that interestingly is there's quite a bit of data that basically, two-thirds, just shy of two-thirds of the time somebody is asked to give monthly through that toggle method they say yes. There's actually quite a bit of evidence that it actually doesn't harm conversion rate at all. We are pretty bullish on that functionality. We feel like it really does help you get more monthly donors. Of course, for whatever reason you're not quite there and we're unable to sell you on that, it would a functionality you get to turn off. Amanda: Nice. All right, Evan, so questions about DonorPerfect Insights. Some people want to know what are the differences between Insights and DonorSearch? Evan: Sure, yes, absolutely. There are lots of different research tools, data augmentation tools, data cleaning tools. Sorry, it can be a little bit confusing. The easiest way for me to explain the difference between the two is there is a little bit of an overlap between DonorSearch and DP Insights. The DonorSearch is really best suited for the really deep dive on your major donor prospects. If you looked me up in DonorSearch, you're not going to find a lot of information about me, probably, but for the rest of your supporters and understanding the overall demographics of them and being able to make better segmentation decisions understanding, this is something that sets that apart. It also is significantly cheaper. Some people are seeing this as a first pass in screening to identify some of the people that they maybe do want to do that deeper dive and using a tool like DonorSearch. Amanda: Then lots of questions around how they can get access to Insight. How can we get that? Evan: If you have a relationship or haven't heard from your account manager. I would definitely reach out to them. Obviously, feel free to direct message me, I can connect you. It is going to be an additional cost, just additional subscription. Like I said, it is going to be a 20% discount for the first year for anybody attending the conference. We've really worked hard to make what we feel is really affordable as well as excellent. Amanda: Is DonorPerfect Insights a US-only feature? Evan: Yes, unfortunately, at this time, it is. I know that we have many of our friends in Canada here. The data sources that are used for this are only for adults in the United States at this time. There are other solutions out there for our friends in Canada. I know that some are using things like CharityCAN and iWave that we also have an integration with, but this particular feature is only going to be available for clients with constituents in the US. Amanda: Sorry, we have so many great questions I have to scroll through them to find them. All right, so, Josh Nelson, that BCC integration everyone loves it, but they want to know, will that email save in your Outlook, and will it create a contact transaction in DonorPerfect? Nelson: Great questions. Yes, from within DonorPerfect. The way we've made it is you launch the email and it opens in your default email application from within DonorPerfect, and then it will send it through Outlook or Gmail with the BCC email address on it. You'll have the email in your sent folder, as well as save it in DonorPerfect. Then when you get the reply from your donor, that's obviously going to be sent to you in Gmail or Outlook, and then you can forward that to DonorPerfect. We'll do the lookup for those donors, and then save that as a contact so you can see the full email in the donor's history there. Amanda: All right, so last question, and I think this one is interesting and I hope each one of you will give us an answer. In your opinion, what do you think is the most underutilized tool in DonorPerfect. Josh Nelson, go ahead. You want to go first. Nelson: I'm so excited about everything. Just being with you guys is just incredible. What I will say is under the theme of transformational fundraising, it's monthly giving. It's by far the single most underutilized feature that we have to offer you that delivers on donor retention, lifelong relationships, more money annually, helping you get back to your mission instead of fundraising and chasing your donors around trying to get them to come back from the dead and getting them to be reactivated just to prevent lapse. You get the 2nd and 3rd and 4th and 5th and 12th and 24th and 36th gift automatically. We make that easy for you. I would love to talk to anybody about helping them with the giving program. Amanda: We only have about two more minutes, so I do have- Nelson: I know. Amanda: - to cut you off, I'm sorry. I know you could talk about monthly giving forever. Evan, is there any underutilized feature that you would like to highlight to people very briefly? Evan: Sure, Yes. There's so many features and things you can do with DonorPerfect that [inaudible 00:59:31], but we've made a real big emphasis on trying to improve the ability for our customers to be able to thank their donors, interact with their donors, get that information stored within DonorPerfect so that it's fair and able to be used for continuity and reporting and everything like that. Really, that comes down to thanking your donors. Thanking them quickly, thanking them personally. Hopefully, some of the changes that we've made recently like the ability to thank a donor directly from the gift record as part of that workflow, we've seen that really increase the utilization of thanking donors directly from DonorPerfect, but it's still around 50% of our clients doing so. I always like seeing that number going up and I encourage everyone to make sure that they thank their donors. Amanda: Josh Colbert, do you have anything you want to share? Colbert: Oh, gosh, I think these guys did give both really great answers. My initial answer was going to be monthly giving like Nelson said. He stressed all the reasons why, so I won't repeat that. I suppose there's a risk of this sounding a bit self-serving. I say it mostly jokingly, but I think our online forms really are still on [unintelligible 01:00:42]. I see in the comments there's a lot of clients that are using our beta processing. I know from our data and statistics that about a half of our client base isn't using it yet. I'm really excited, we're really excited about this new online form solution. The one thing that I didn't touch on for those of you who know, you know this, but for those of you who don't use our forms, is actually, it's fully integrated with your CRM. Your codes and your data entry is going to show up in your CRM automatically. We've gotten lots of great feedback and testimonials from clients of that time savings of that data entry really is powerful. I still do feel like that's a bit underutilized and there's a lot of value in our online processing solutions. Amanda: I'm just going to throw out from my personal thoughts, scheduled reports. Just having reports delivered to the inbox of yourself or your key stakeholders I think that's a powerful solution that more of our clients should definitely leverage. We already took an extra minute of everyone's time, so we're going to wrap it up for today. Thank you, Josh, Josh, and Evan. We're going to have a 15-minute break where we encourage all of you to go ahead and attend some of our booths, and then we're going to have the next rounds of sessions starting at 1:45. Thank you, everyone and I hope you all have a great rest of your day. Colbert: Take care, everyone. Evan: Thanks, everyone. Nelson: It's so good to see you again. [01:02:45] [END OF AUDIO]

Community Learning Lab: No Time? Try These Automation & Efficiency Tips for Your Donor Engagement

Putting aside that awesome donor engagement idea because the thought of executing it seems nearly impossible?

Community Learning Lab: No Time? Try These Automation & Efficiency Tips for Your Donor Engagement

Description

Putting aside that awesome donor engagement idea because the thought of executing it seems nearly impossible? Not so fast! With the right tools and processes in place, executing a standout multichannel fundraising strategy is a lot less of a hassle than it seems. Let nonprofit tech experts Kelly and Sarah show you how it’s done so you can turn your big ideas into your next hit campaign!

Transcript

Kelly Ramage: All right, good afternoon, everybody. Welcome to our session No Time? Automation and Efficiency Tips for Your Donor Engagement. We are thrilled that you are here. Before I do formal introductions, just a couple of reminders about our session. There is a handout available for you to download. We recommend that you add it to your briefcase. What you will need to do is scroll all the way down to the bottom and you will find it there. Sarah and I love questions. Feel free to ask them but try and place them in the question mark section of the panel on the right hand side and we will try to address as many of them as possible in our designated time that we have built into the session at the end. I am Kelly Ramage. I'm joined by my colleague Sarah Lalonde but I am the session host and co-presenter with Sarah. Sarah and I each have bios. You can read about us if you would like, but combined, believe it or not, we represent 30 years of training and development experience. It's crazy because I don't feel that old. I don't know about you Sarah. We love what we do. Before you start figuring out our actual ages we're going to go ahead and get started. We know you have many different segments of prospects and donors you can engage with but we only have one hour so we had to choose one. Before we reveal which segment we are going to use as our example, keep in mind that the tools and the features and the functions we show you will be able to be applied to many segments. Think about this as a bit of a model. We chose to focus, as you can see on our slide, on donor retention and one specific donor retention strategy of monthly giving. Monthly giving and donor retention are two very exciting topics in my book anyway. Before we dive into the details let's look for a brief moment and think about donor retention using this graphic that we have here on the screen. What this graphic represents is actually DonorPerfect customer. This is all about your data and as it relates specifically to donor retention. Now, you may see just numbers and graphics but what I see are some great possibilities. For example, by having a donor become a monthly donor using automatic, yes, I said the word, automatic monthly giving, the donor retention rate is 90%. Thanking the donor the same day their gift is received, check out that number: 61%. In fact, just if you look at all of those numbers, all of those donor retention numbers are higher than the industry average right now. Look at that lifetime value of retained donors. That's an amazing figure, $4,375. Pretty amazing. Now that you know our focus and where we're going to be speaking from, again, keeping in mind it's a model, we do want to hear from you. What we're going to do is we're going to do a poll. I don't know if you've participated in a poll yet in any of the sessions but what we are wondering is how do you engage with your monthly donors? On the right hand side you're going to see a little option for a poll. It has a little next to it. You can see it's circled on the screen, and we would love to hear or see, rather, your response by clicking on your answer. We'll give you just a couple of seconds to see how often the group we have together right now with us, which looks like it's about roughly maybe just shy of 300, how often do you engage with your monthly donors? Sarah, we'll give it about 10 more seconds. Sarah Lolande: Still see people answering. Kelly: All right, what are you seeing right now as the front runner, Sarah? Sarah: The every month is slightly above end of year only. It's moving up. It's moving up. Kelly: All right, in five, four, three, two, one, and time. What do we have? What's the highest way that this group of participants are engaging with their monthly donors? Sarah: You should be able to see the results in the poll. It was very interesting how when it started it was a little bit of everywhere, and then it was 'every month'; 'end of year'. Those are quite opposite yet still common. Kelly: All right, good results. Every month does win out, and if that is you then maybe you're going to learn some tips and tricks to make it more efficient. If you are not sure or maybe you only deal with the first gift or end of year, perhaps, some of what we're going to show you might encourage you to at least consider maybe interacting with them a bit more. All right, as we dive in here and we move forward in our conversation, what we're going to start with using the donor retention and monthly giving as our strategy, is we're going to focus on managing donations efficiently. Now, you're going to hear the words efficient and automatic and time savers quite a bit today. Everything that we're showing you is actually going to help you do those things so that you can engage with your donors. You can spend time doing things that are most important. If you can imagine, just picture yourself making a donation online. What are some of the behaviors that you experience and you probably even expect? Your donors would expect the same thing, is that as soon as you press submit, you've made that donation, you're expecting and hoping that you're going to get an immediate thank you. That is absolutely true for our donors as well. Soon as they press submit at your site they can get an immediate thank you. That thank you email can be personalized. It can tell them how much you appreciate their contribution, their partnership and the impact of their gift. Now, that's wonderful but now we want to put on a time saving benefit for you, is that it can automatically be brought in into DonorPerfect. You don't need to worry about going somewhere else, downloading it into Excel and importing it. Then the other piece that it's going to do is not only bring it into DonorPerfect but if it's a new donor, which is an important group of people, but if it's a new donor then it's going to search for them add them as a donor in the system and then create the commitment which we call a pledge. All of this is going to just happen if you set up your system to do this. These are some great options, Sarah, that DonorPerfect offers right out of the gate to save time and be efficient. I know that there are other things that DonorPerfect can do that you are going to continue to wow our audience with. Now I'm going to pass the baton to Sarah. She's going to talk a little bit more about a really cool feature. Sarah: Yes. Everything you said is true. The transaction can happen and we'll create it automatically in DonorPerfect. We're going to see some examples of that shortly. The other thing that you can do is you can let DonorPerfect do all the work for you by using our smart action. What a smart action can do is at the same time as this transaction gets created in DonorPerfect, automatically, that word again, automatic, it will send an email to a staff at your organization letting that person know that a new monthly donor has just enrolled into your monthly giving program. It will also create a task directly in DonorPerfect in the contacts table letting you know you need to call this donor to welcome them to say thank you. You can see those upcoming tasks at a glance are on our new homepage. Then just check them off as you go. How about I show you all of this in DonorPerfect directly. What do you think? Kelly: I think it's a great idea because sometimes seeing is believing. Sarah: Amazing. Let's imagine we have this donor that went onto the website and decided that they were going to make a commitment and become a monthly donor. I've prefilled this form up with my name but it's that simple. You just fill in the form, scroll down, you get to the bottom of it and then you would just hit 'next'. At the complete bottom I'm submitting my payment. I'm paying an extra $150 to cover for some of those credit card fees. I'm going to pay that every month to keep helping forever. Now, I get this here. This particular page, but I also automatically got my personalized thank you. My personalized thank you that I've received is going to look like this in this scenario because this is what I made it look like. It's giving a little story about how we're helping Nora specifically, or dogs like Nora, and giving in a picture, make you feel a connection to what you just decided to become a part of. In DonorPerfect, directly what it did, so now if I take you to DonorPerfect, bear with me as I navigate. In DonorPerfect, I'm going to look my name and here is the record it created. I have a brand new record created because I did not exist. I'm a new donor. I do not have a record in this system yet. It created the first payment, so I just donated my first $51.50 as part as my commitment. If I go here, it created the pledge which is the commitment to give $51.50 once a month. So every 5th of the month, and we'll talk about that a little bit later, this is going to be processed. I also mentioned it could create a to-do list. What the system did is it created a task right here in the contact table where now there is a telephone call that was assigned to someone in the next three days, so you have three days to call this donor to welcome them. I've also received an email, so keeping what's showing you my emails here-- One second. I'm just going to show you. Here we go. Coming [chuckles]. There's my automatic email that just came in that says a new monthly donor on the 5th of the month. That email could be customized, if there was something more you wanted, like you wanted to include the phone number or you wanted to include the email address, you wanted to include potentially if they had a choice on what they're participating if you have different programs, all of that could be included. Then, finally, when you go to the homepage, you have your to-do list. These are the three phone calls that have been assigned to me that I have to do today. If I scroll down and I do show me contacts during the next seven days, I'm going to see the Sarah Lalonde one, so the one that we just did together, as well as all these other ones that are coming up in the next few days. If I'm doing my work, I can just mark this as done right here. I could add a note if I wanted to. About the phone call, I'll grade it "1" and then I can save. Then I can keep going, and this one is removed. It's as easy as checking out my checking a checklist. Kelly: Fantastic. Hopefully, in the short amount of time we've had together, you're already thinking of ways that you can save time. As Sarah mentioned in the monthly giving experience is when we have monthly donors we want to welcome them because we know that donor retention is going to increase with recurring contributions. We often refer to it as monthly because that is the most common, but then we built into DonorPerfect, there is that word again, automatic processing. There's actually two levels of this. We have automatic monthly giving. Automatic monthly giving is a daily process that DonorPerfect does for you that's actually looking at the individual pledge details to determine if it needs to be processed. If somebody is supposed to be processed on the 5th of the month, they're the ones that are going to be processed on the 5th of the month, not the 4th, not the 6th, not the 10th. When those days roll around, that's when those accounts are going to be processed. We asked the question, how often do you engage with your monthly donors? In our group, we had just by a little bit ahead many of you saying every month. If we were to throw out a second poll, which we're not going to do, of those, how many of you are taking advantage of automatic monthly giving receipts? Well, if you're not, you should. If you are contemplating how can we save time and still engage with these donors and make it personal, then you should consider the automatic monthly giving receipt. This is an effortless way to say thank you and communicate with your supporters every month. The beauty of this though is even though it's an automatic process, we are still providing the all-important way of being personal because if you think about your own experience, again, put ourselves in our donor's shoes, we want to receive that personalization. We don't want a "Dear Friend" email, we want a "Dear Kelly", or a "Dear Sarah" email. Sarah, can you show our audience how easy it is to make a change to those email templates? Sarah: Yes, I can and I would love to. Let me bring back DonorPerfect onto our screen here. What happens is whenever a pledge is created, you can assign a thank you letter code directly in the pledge. If I go back to my record briefly and to my pledge that I have created-- Here it comes. I am just opening a pledge. You have here the thank you letter that it's assigned. This thank you letter, when it is assigned to a monthly pledge, can be sent automatically by using the automatic receipt that is found in tasks monthly giving. If you use our monthly giving module, you've been here before, you can either process manually or automatic. We have automatic processing on in the system as well as automatic receipts, meaning an email is sent to everyone as the gifts are processed. Then what Kelly was asking me to show you is where do I customize that email? Remember, I showed you the code that it's associated with. When I go into mailings and email templates, I'm going to see here that I can create a different template and associate them with that specific code. Right now, the monthly donor thank you is assigned to my October email. I had a different one in September, but this is the current one that my donors are going to be receiving and it is set up in here so it includes merge-field the first-names, so that it is going directly to them and it includes a story about Daisy in this case and how great she felt recently, thanks to the help of our monthly donors. Then when we go back and we looked at September, you will see when they were receiving the September email, it was a completely different one, where they were getting to know Lucy here who needed a special diet to feel better. The idea is still customizing with the merge field. You can also include, if you have donors that donate monthly but to specific funds, specific categories, and include that in your email message, so that it's really personalized to them and what they're contributing to. I think that's back to you, Kelly. I think you're muted. [silence] Kelly: Even experienced trainers forget to unmute themselves from time to time. All right, before you go back to our presentation, Sarah, can you open up that email template one more time? One of the things that I often try and remember is I am not an expert at making things look nice when it comes to graphics and so forth. At the top here, you can see that there's that editor and it's as easy as clicking on that image tool so that you can get those cute pictures of Daisy and Lucy and Nora. It's not anything hidden. It's nothing extra. It is all part of DonorPerfect. It is something that I love to highlight because sometimes, when you get caught up in how sharp something looks, you think, "Oh, I can't do that." That's absolutely not the case here. Thanks, Sarah. Sarah: You're welcome. Kelly: All right, I don't know if you are yet excited about all of the things that we've shown you and we're just getting started. I think everybody would agree that one cornerstone or one key element of any non-profit success is knowing where they're at in terms of their progress towards a goal. You might think of that as reports, and I would agree. We have a lot of great reports in DonorPerfect. Some of them are standard and give you common information like the gifts that you've received in a certain time period, the total dollars raised for your fundraising efforts whether that be a campaign or towards your general ledger. Then there are ways in some of those standard reports but also in very specific reporting needs using the easy report builder where you can choose to see what you want to see. Again, thinking about our scenario of donor retention, and we're really zeroing in on monthly donors but not just all monthly donors, we're going to think about new monthly donors. Because coming out of the pandemic, I've heard many times over that there's a lot of new donors that people are getting and gaining and trying to build relationships with but it's overwhelming. One way that you can zero in on not only the information you want to see but you can also target who you want to see. The example is the new recurring donor information. It's a report. Now that sounds like it's a lot of work. Well, one of the things that you can do with several of the DonorPerfect canned reports but definitely with the easy reports where you are designing it yourself is you can choose to set it up, apply a selection filter using some really cool functionality that we're not going to spend too much time on today but just know that it can be done, and we're going to schedule it. In a sense, I am going to go out there and say you can schedule and forget it because it's going to arrive in your inbox so that you don't have to remember now where did I go? What filter did I apply to get the results that you wanted to see? Sarah, take it from here and wow our friends with the schedule and forget it options as well as our dashboards. Sarah: This is an example here of a report that I received in an email. Before showing you how I got there, I just wanted you to see the results. This came attached to my email with a subject of 'scheduled report' and here it was, my new monthly donors for the month of September. If I'm going to DonorPerfect, to get to that, I got to go to Reports and then Report Center where all of our reports are found. In the Report Center, I created my own report called 'New Recurring Donor Report'. I gave it that name and I created it using the Easy Report builder that I may not show you today but is actually called Easy Report for a reason. With the help of support and the knowledge base you can definitely do it too. In the recurring report, you have the option down here to schedule. When I hit 'schedule' right here, I can choose when do I want to receive this and where do I want to send it. So I can give it a name. I can choose my format, PDF, Excel, Word or CSV. I can choose when to receive it. Do I want to receive it monthly, daily, weekly, which day of the month, and then I can do it in the morning or after five o'clock. I can add a little message and I can send it to other people. If you have colleagues that want to get it, just separate the email address with a comma and include it to multiple people and then I would save. Does that sound great? Kelly: That sounds amazing. Sarah: Yes, go ahead. Kelly: I know. I was just going to say, in addition, Sarah, could you go to the financial report called 'Gifts by Date', please? As she just navigates there, this is one of those standard reports that I was mentioning that exists that everybody has that you can also schedule and send it. It would behave the same way as that Easy Report. Since I mentioned it, I wanted to make sure that Sarah showed you where that was at. Sarah, I think you wanted to talk about our dashboards. I know I love them but I'll let you go ahead and continue the conversation. Sarah: That's right. That's where I was going to go next. I was going to go to Reports and then Dashboard and remind you in case you didn't and if you knew already or tell you in case you didn't know that we do have three fantastic dashboards available to you in DonorPerfect. The Organization Dashboard which will have a lot of metrics that the whole organization can see, the My Dashboard that can be customized for each user. Mine can look slightly different than Kelly's and we could have different things on it. Finally, the Monthly Giving Dashboard. What I'm going to do is I'm going to show you a slide of the Monthly Giving Dashboard because I do not have enough data in the system but here you can see what that dashboard looks like. Right away I can see at a glance what's going on month to month with my monthly giving program and in green here, you've got dollar amounts. This is really what is being received. Then below, you've got the donor count. I have 65 monthly donor over the last 12 months and my average would be $73.63. You can click on these numbers and you can measure your performance month over month really easily with this. The other thing that's interesting is that at the top I have a $40 failed amount. That is showing up because someone's transaction did not go through. Maybe it's an expired credit card, maybe something else is wrong. This is to alert you so you can click on that amount, see what it is, reach out to that donor and, hopefully, get it processed before the next month. Kelly: Awesome. All right, we have so far covered how to get donations that are given by donors from an online form into DonorPerfect efficiently, how to communicate with those donors in an automatic way, and stay engaged with them using the contacts page and the homepage and we have talked about reports. Now we're focusing on donor retention and we're really zeroing in on monthly donors specifically with new monthly donors. A lot of the data in the industry really suggest that you need to let your donors guide you. What that really means is that you have to stop and listen. Sometimes that takes [chuckles] time and it's not going to happen overnight. There's so many ways that we can do this. We can have those personal conversations and visits and so forth but we can also use some of the features in DonorPerfect another type of form called a survey where we could provide a safe way for our new monthly donors to provide some feedback. What has it been like to become a new donor? Is the welcome pack effective? Really you can use that data as a guide. Sarah has here on the screen. She is the author of this form, so I will let her speak to it but use that survey data to your advantage. Sarah, what do we have? Sarah: Well, this is a survey that's been created to send to someone who was a first-time donor and asking them, "Why did you choose us? What made you decide to give us some of your money?" Then we're asking them, "How do you want us to communicate with you in the future? What would you like? Do you want us to send you a newsletter? Do you like to read updates on our website? Do you like to visit us on Instagram or on Facebook? If you have a project, what would be the best project that you would like to participate with? Build the kitty center or refurbish the kitty city wing, for example. What is it that interests you?" Finally, "Are you interested in volunteering with us? Is that something that you would like to help? Do more than just give us some money but really participate and come and help take care of the animals here at the shelter," and this particular story here is an animal rescue. Really the idea of the survey is asking them, "What do you want going forward?" Maybe you just want to give us money and see what it's doing once a month. Maybe you want more. That's really getting to know them that way. Kelly: All right, one of the things that all of our online forms will do is it will be brought back into DonorPerfect. The data isn't just going to sit somewhere, it can actually come into the record and that data then is, again, another level of information that you can dig into and review and it will also then help target specific messages. It will give you the ability to create those messages to those donors because you can find out what their interests are. It's just you're building that relationship. One of the things, one of the analogies that I love, I think it's been around for a while but it seems to really have resurfaced recently, is that donor engagements is like a dating relationship. You want to keep learning more about your donors and use the tool tools to save time where you absolutely can, but then spend time interacting with them. You'll be on time because you're using some of the cool features that we've already highlighted. All right, one of the other things that DonorPerfect, I think, does a great job of is integrating with other applications. DonorPerfect is a fantastic source or a hub of information. We have a lot of integrations and integrations really summary statement for me is where you're able to use the benefits of both applications and the feature we want to highlight right now is Constant Contact. Constant Contact, you may have participated in that session earlier right before this one where you learn a lot about what it can do but, what we want to highlight in this line of thinking about time saving efficiencies is that you can use the integration and set it up to have what's referred to as dynamic lists. Now, a dynamic list is something where you are going to go in and you're going to say, "I want every time there is a new donor record added to DonorPerfect, where it is recurring frequency as monthly and it is to this campaign, add them to my email list overnight," and just do it for me. A dynamic list is a feature that exists between DonorPerfect and Constant Contact. We are having a little bit of a technical hiccup, so we're just going to keep moving forward here. Don't worry about it, Sarah. We've got it covered. What we're going to do is we're just going to talk us through this. Nothing like live sessions where things can go crazy. We've experienced crazy. We won't even tell you what it is, but what we're going to talk about is the integration between DonorPerfect and Constant Contact. Sarah, why don't you start in DonorPerfect real quick, just so we can show them where this dynamic list exists. Sarah: In DonorPerfect you have an integration piece over here in the mailings feature called Constant Contact Email. That is how you connect the two together. This is not connected. You can't ignore that piece. Here, you would connect it. Actually, I could connect it right now. Could I? Can do that since my slides are broken, let's just go forward for now here with whatever's going on. Here, I'm just going to connect with this system together and I am hoping I have the right code. Once they're connected, whenever you go to that section of DonorPerfect, you're really going to just see this here. This is showing you any emails that have been sent, super quick results, and the most important, the power tool here, the list management tool where you can create all sorts of lists. You can create lists that are manual, which is just a one time push. It still gives you the ability to create the lists right here without having to export, import data. You create it here one time and then magically in Constant Contact there is your list. The second thing that it does is that it lets you create a dynamic list, which is even more powerful. When I'm adding a new list, the system is going to let me choose which list I want to create. Here it's going to give me the option of dynamic. When I'm adding a dynamic list, I get the ability here to create a filter and whatever fits my filter is what is going to be on this list. I'm not going to go into filtering details right now, but let's say, for example, I want to have all of my monthly donors, just all my monthly donors. I haven't segmented this yet. I'm just saying all monthly donors. I create a filter for that. I get a new monthly donor today. Tonight, the two systems connect to each other and automatically tomorrow morning when I'm sending emails that new monthly donor is included without me having to do anything. It just happened by itself while I was asleep. If we're creating a list that's based on welcoming brand new monthly donors, then we can also do that by creating a list that would specify new monthly donors this week or last week, this month, however we would want to do it and just add names to the list that way. Then when I go to Constant Contact and I have my list that exists already, yes, I'm still working, I can go to the campaigns and I can create a new campaign and a campaign in Constant Contact is basically the email that you're sending. Here, we're going to see some template selection. We have standard selection templates, but you will see up here DonorPerfect templates. That is, again, because of this integration, you can have pre-made templates on getting people to join your monthly giving program, some monthly giving thank you's and a monthly giving newsletter, for example, that I can just take this as my base to start working from to then create my email. Kelly: Now, one other piece that I think, perhaps, Sarah and I get used to and I fail to highlight from time to time is that online form that Sarah started out with. Well, think about the online form and the survey. We could embed that URL into these email templates. Now you're pulling it full circle and taking advantage of one little feature, but how you have DonorPerfect, you have an online form, and you have a Constant Contact Email template and how you can pull it all together. What the donor's going to receive is a really sharp and classy email. Then when they respond, they open the email, that information's going to go back into their record into contacts. If they respond and fill out the survey, you're going to get that information in their record. You can start to see how all of these facets are going to be working together to ultimately save you time, give you the ability to interact with your donors at different level. We're highlighting email. The other piece is you could do similar things with direct mail where you can have that channel where you're engaging with your donors in, perhaps, a direct mail effort as well, because, monthly donors, you tend to get a lot of email addresses. There are other ways that you could engage donors that are different than email. Sarah, are you able to get into the knowledge base at all so that we can highlight the email template e-book? Sarah: Yes. Just bear with me as I get there. Are you seeing it on the screen? Kelly: Yes, we are seeing the knowledge base. Sarah: If we were to just write e-book, we'll get a bunch of them. Which one were you speaking of? Kelly: I think you could pick the welcome the monthly giving e-book. You could pick the thank you digital email template e-book. My point in having her come here is that one of the things that we have made available to you are some resources that are taking industry standards, best practices, pairing it with DonorPerfect's cool functionality and time savers and trying to make it broken down into bite size chunks or tasks so that you're not overwhelmed in something if it's new to you. The knowledge base is full of a lot of information, but this is another one that ties into our conversation that we're having right now about donor retention and monthly giving. Sarah, is there anything else that you would like to show or speak to as it relates to the integration with Constant Contact or the email templates or anything, perhaps, that I am forgetting at this moment? Sarah: I think that you covered mostly what I was thinking of in terms of that integration. Fortunately, I don't have anything else to add right now. I'm assuming or hoping everyone did attend a session on Constant Contact because there are more options directly in Constant Contact in terms of automation where you could preset in advance in a specific timeframe how often someone receives an email after they've received the first one, seven days later, seven days later, three days later, whichever, a month later, you can set all of that up. That is very cool as well. I think we could, maybe, look at some questions that we've been receiving? What do you think? Kelly: Sure, absolutely. Sarah: It was going to be the last section of our presentation and for some reason my slides are really broken. I'm going to just move on from that. Maybe I'm going to no longer present anything and we can take a look at the questions. Kelly: One of the questions, let me just scroll through here. Sarah: We got a lot, that's why I figured it's probably a good thing to have a longer question period. Kelly: Okay, so a question since we're talking about Constant Contact is can DonorPerfect integrate with an email platform other than Constant Contact? In terms of true integration, no, that's the only one that it does integrate with, but in DonorPerfect, you are able to create an email list through the export to file option and then you could import that. In terms of a true integration it really only integrates, for this mass email communication that we're talking about, with Constant Contact. I'm emphasizing that because if you go to the Thursday session of our DonorPerfect roadmap, you're going to hear about a really cool function where it's one off emails, but you're able to use your own email platform. Sarah: Yes, that is very cool. Apparently there was a lot of people that had difficulty finding the handout at the bottom of the screen, at the beginning of the session. I don't know if that was resolved. Kelly: I'm hoping yes. Well, it should be there so, hopefully, it is and if it's not, we will try and rectify that after the session is over. Sarah: Yes. We'll try to make sure that everyone gets it for sure. Kelly: Okay, a question, Sarah, common one about online forms. How can you keep from duplicates being created when a donor puts their info in maybe slightly different than their current donor records? What do you find as some tips and tricks about that, Sarah? Sarah: There's different things that you can do. Obviously, there are matching criteria that are used when the transactions are being downloaded into DonorPerfect. Reviewing those can make a difference so that if someone is putting in a different address, it's not necessarily going to look at their full address, especially if it is the same address, but written slightly different. Maybe not looking at the full name as well would be another good advice on that. Kelly: Oh, a question. This is an easy one. Are there webinars on automatic monthly giving specifically? There is a webinar, actually a webinar series on monthly giving, but is there one that's completely dedicated to automatic monthly giving? There isn't a webinar that's focused solely on that, but there is a webinar called The Ins and Outs of Monthly Giving, I believe is the name of it where automatic monthly giving is one of the primary topics in that. Sarah, go ahead. Sarah: I'm trying to go through questions and there's so many. Someone was asking when I was speaking about those thank you that were done monthly, how would that be managed. I got a few questions in here. One asked me, do you a global update to change? Could that happen by itself? There is, obviously, a trickiness to it if the first of the month is on the weekend. In the example that I was doing, there was no global update needed because when the new template would be created automatically, you would just assign that one. I kept both in the system to show you both, but you could also always just edit the previous one so you don't even have to create a new one or you could create a new one and then just assign it to the thank you letter itself. Right now, we can't automate the changing which letter is assigned. It would be on the moment of creation that you would change it. In that case I would suggest doing it on the last working day of the month. Kelly: How can I tell if smart actions are set up to alert me to new donors? Sarah: You would want to go to the smart action. Maybe I can reshare my screen briefly and show you where smart actions are because there was a few questions about that actually. Bear with me as I do that difficulty, it looks like. One second here. Let me just share my screen. I'm still not sure what happened to-- Kelly: All right, it looks like Sarah is disappeared from the session. I'll answer your questions, but I will not be able to show it to you in DonorPerfect. Oh, wait. She is back. There she is. Now we have DonorPerfect. Sarah: Technology goes wrong. It goes wrong the whole way so bear with me here. I'm going to log in to DonorPerfect. Kelly: Just to clarify, the handout that goes with this particular session, since this is really a session where we are highlighting a lot of features in DonorPerfect, we decided that instead of trying to explain in our own words what they are, is to point you to resources that already exist. If you happen to find the handout, there are a lot of embedded resources that are about the given topic. Many of them are going to be knowledge-based articles. Some of them might be blog posts. Some of them might be an e-book. Okay, Sarah, it looks like you're in so let's talk about smart actions. Sarah: Smart actions are found in the gear right here and then right there we've got smart action, third one from the bottom, depending what smart actions you're looking for. I'm going to show you the one that I have and the one that we saw in action. Then to answer the question to check if I have a smart action that does, I don't remember what that exact thing was, this is where you would want to come. If you have none, then you know you don't have it. If you have something, then you have to go look at what it does. Here, I've got my new monthly donor 1. If I click here on this little pencil, in my case, there's a comment that tells me what it's going to do. It's going to create a transaction for a telephone call and send an email [unintelligible 00:47:48] created for a new monthly donor. What is good to know about smart actions is that the way that they work is they work with a trigger and then the action itself. The trigger is always something needs to happen for the magic to happen. What is that? In this example, it is the new pledge save. Whenever a brand new pledge is saved in DonorPerfect, it could be because it came from an online form or because I manually created a pledge and saved it. That's my trigger. It will trigger the action. There's many different possibilities of triggers. It could be just on a new gift saved, for example, instead. It doesn't have to be monthly donors. It could just be a first-time donor, for example. Now, if I was to leave it as a new pledge save and not put a selection filter, as you may or may not know, selection filters are how I identify which records do I want this to apply to. If I don't have a selection filter that means everyone, the whole database. Anytime a new pledge is saved no matter why it will automatically go true. I created a filter to specify that it had to be those that were enrolled in my monthly giving program. You could do that based on the fact that they have the monthly giving turned on. You could choose to only want to see gifts of a certain amount. You could choose to see the frequency monthly. There's a lot of options filtering. The possibilities are endless. Wouldn't she say, Kelly? Kelly: Yes. Sarah: That's the idea I went with. Then, obviously, it's active. Otherwise, it wouldn't have worked. Once you have your trigger set up, then you got the action you can configure. In my case I have two actions the first one being I sent an automatic email to someone to let them know that a new monthly donor has now been entered. Right here it's the message and whenever you see those percentage signs that's because I'm including merge fields directly from DonorPerfect. For example, I've got the first name, the last name, the donor ID, and then the monthly amount, and when did it start. That's the information that sent in my email. Like I mentioned earlier, I could add anything. I could add a phone number, I could add a lot more than that if I wanted to, what fund did they choose, for example, where did they decide to designate their gift? And so on. Then I created a transaction and the transaction is a telephone call that is due three days plus today, meaning it's giving me three days after the day that this pledge got saved to do this call. Then this is the message that you see in my contact notes. Kelly: Sarah, one of the questions that came in that ties into this smart action, but also an online form email is, can we review the process to send an automatic email and assign a thank you? Basically, what's going to happen is the automatic email is going to come from the online form, and perhaps Sarah can show us where that's at where you can personalize that email. When that transaction, that recurring gift comes into DonorPerfect, you can build a smart action to be so smart that it's going to say, "Hey, this is not only just a new donor, a new pledge, a new recurring donor, it was created by an online form." When those two things are true, then assign a task to call thank you. Take it full circle then it's going to show up on your home page. The system's going to do all this for you. Part of the answer to that question is you're going to build a smart action for those transactions coming in from an online form. Where can we go? Can you show us where in the online form we can personalize the email? Sarah: Yes, I would love to. I went really fast, but in the app links, you have all those different options than I chose online forms and here we've got different forms that I have, so that's the survey, and then here is my monthly giving form and I can hit the little pencil to edit it, and set email options. You're going to potentially notice that this looks similar to when I showed you the previous editor of email templates with a little toolbar at the top to help you figure out how to make things pretty. Again, to include a picture, all I had to do was click on this little icon, and then right here choose an image from my computer that I wanted to include. If we wanted to add Darla to this email, that's how I would do it. It's really simple to do that. Then here's the text and you can just customize the text and you can use these functions to change your font and all of that. This is sent automatically whenever someone's payment is submitted and gone through. Kelly: Yes, I believe that's the automatic email that was being asked about. There was a question somewhere. I don't know if it was in chat or question, but it was about Constant Contact. A couple of questions are, is integration with Constant Contact included in DonorPerfect? In large part, I'm going to say the answer is yes. Some of that might be dependent on the package that you have and how long you've been using DonorPerfect. I don't know. The best solution to getting the right answer for your specific scenario is to hop over into I think it's called the client room where our account managers are at and they can look up your account and let you know for sure. Another question that came in about Constant Contact in a variety of ways is if you have an existing Constant Contact account, can it be linked up to DonorPerfect? The answer is, yes. We actually have a great knowledge base article that will walk you through the process. Again, we have trainers and we have support reps that if you're nervous about it, you can let us know and some of you I know are in the onboarding process. You can also let your onboarding coordinator know, but we would love to just talk through how to best do that for you, but the short answer is yes, that can be done. Sarah, it looks like we have time maybe for, if I'm looking at the clock, one or two more questions. Sarah, is there a question that you can see that you would like to answer? Sarah: Well, there was a super quick one that will take me just a few seconds to answer about when I send a report by email, can that be password protected? The answer is yes. Just wanted to point that out. I didn't show it on screen, but when I was originally scheduling the report, and if technology works today for a brief moment, please. [laughs] When I'm scheduling, I do have this little walk, so I could choose to put a password right here. That was one question. Another question that came in, again, super quick, I'm trying to see quickly. Do you see anything? Kelly: The one question that I just want to clarify is that when we're talking about processing online gifts for recurring donors for any type of donation really, you would have to use our payment processing solution. If you would like to learn more about that, we actually have a room. It's, I think, called the save room. The lounge is also the same thing so it's a smaller version. We have people there that can speak to you about the specifics and the options and answer any of those questions. I see a question, can we still do some of that payment processing for these recurring gifts, if you are using another company? The answer is no. You would have to use our solutions. Sarah: Right, but you could still do a lot of this. You could still personalize thank you emails that you're sending, it just won't be automated in here, but you could still use Constant Contact for newsletters, for example. There is a super quick question. Will fail gift receive a monthly giving automatic receipt or only those that are successful? Kelly: They shouldn't receive anything if it failed. They shouldn't receive anything at all. In fact, one of the things that's built into DonorPerfect, which we didn't get into all of these other kinds of oversight things which are important, there is a place in the program where you can go to see the transactions that have failed. You can also go to a place in DonorPerfect under receipts, where you can see if the emails were successfully sent for the automatic. While the benefit of the automation is really wonderful and powerful, there are places in the program where you can go to check to make sure everything is working as you would expect it to. That is actually time. I am thrilled that you're here. Sorry for the technical hiccup, but I had a great time doing this and leading this with Sarah. Sarah, is there anything that you would like to end our session with? Sarah: I just want to say thank you so much for all your questions. If they did not get answered, I'm really sorry. I appreciate you so much, and I hope to see you again in our next few sessions, most likely tomorrow and Thursday, but I think there's one more today, actually. [unintelligible 00:58:25] Kelly: Yes. There's one more today. Check out the keynote speaker and then come back tomorrow and then come back Thursday for some more donor-specific content. Thanks so much. [00:59:12] [END OF AUDIO]

Transform Your Fundraising Events

Hear how DonorPerfect clients have used Qgiv and Givecloud to help transform their fundraising events by generating more donations.

Transform Your Fundraising Events

Description

Hear how DonorPerfect clients have used Qgiv and Givecloud to help transform their fundraising events by generating more donations.

Transcript

Darryl Moser: All right. It looks like our stream has started. We are getting a pretty full room so that's great to see for our topic today. Let me just give it a few more seconds here to makes sure that everyone is synched up and we'll do a little bit of an intro. We are super happy to have everyone here to talk about successful virtual fundraising which has certainly been a challenge over this past year. I just want to thank all of you for being a part of this. I think one of these sessions when we've got a bit of the Q&A and we can see some of the interaction from the group will all help us to be better in some of this unchartered territory as we went through COVID and we had lots of virtual experiences then everybody starts talking about hybrid. Now, we're still in the state of trying to understand what the best technique may be for virtual or by event type and fundraising techniques. In this session, we're going to cover those challenges with virtual fundraising as well as the transformative fundraising methods that proved super effective during the pandemic, as well as how to use those techniques and what kind of role they're going to play in the future. This session is actually going to be split into two 30-minute topics. My name is Darryl Moser. I'm the Business Development Manager for DonorPerfect. I work with all of our partner products and we brought forward a couple of partner tools that have had some exceptional responses over this past year in helping our nonprofits to fundraise. The first is focused on the virtual event experiences of Big Brothers and Big Sisters in Utah. It's covered by event manager, Kristi Curtis and they are using the Qgiv platform. Then 30 minutes in, we will cover the Humane Animal Welfare Society of Waukesha, Wisconsin and the variety of fundraising tools that they used that were effective for remote and distance donor community. Joining us today from Qgiv, we have Kimberly Funk who is the Channel Marketing Manager. Kim is a seasoned marketing and sales professional having worked extensively in various industries such as financial, entertainment, solar, employment and franchising, and most importantly, nonprofit. In her free time, she is on the tennis court, pilates studio, and being a dog mom to her rescue puppies. Together with Kimberly from Qgiv, we also have Brendan Smith who's available to do some additional Q&A. At this time, Kimberly, I believe you can take it away. Kimberly Funk: Thank you so much, Darryl. Hello, everyone. Thank you for joining our session today. Before we do get started, we want to say how honored we are to be a sponsor of this event and a long-standing technology partner with DonorPerfect. Who are we? We're Qgiv. We provide nonprofits like you with a platform of online fundraising solutions to help you raise more money in support of your mission. We're to help you in your fundraising journey every step of the way and are very grateful again to be part of the event. We do appreciate you taking time from your busy schedules. As Darryl had said, my name is Kimberly Funk and I am part of the Qgiv team. I am joined by colleague Brendan Smith and together we are here to share some great reasons to keep a virtual fundraising event on your calendar. As part of the community theme of the conference, we are sharing one of our nonprofit friends, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah's story and how they made the jump to a virtual event. When you go camping, what do you take? A tarp, a poncho, maybe just in case it rains, a first aid kit in case someone hurts themselves, extra socks, in case yours get wet, spare batteries for your flashlight. You get the picture. You don't want to get rained on, hurt, left in the dark but you do want to be prepared to navigate the unknown. Nothing drove home the importance of preparing for the unknown quite like 2020. In early 2020, COVID-19 made its way into the United States, and all at once, nonprofits had to rethink their fundraising strategies. Fundraising events were canceled or moved online. Facilities closed as lockdown measures were put in place, staff adjusted to working from home, all the while, while they worked to meet their communities' needs under these difficult circumstances. That's why we surveyed nonprofits and donors to learn how each group responded to the events in 2020. This gave us a bird's eye view into nonprofits' fears and expectations, their strategies and ideas, and how donors supported their favorite nonprofits and causes. The result was our report Navigating the Unknown: 2020 Findings to Future-Proof Your Fundraising. Non-profits added virtual fundraising events to their calendars and explored other ways of getting their donors engaged. Even now as we're hopefully getting back to normal, virtual and hybrid events should continue to be an important part of your fundraising strategy as donors are showing that they do want to participate remotely. Your nonprofits donor base is unique and the combination of fundraising tools you've used in the past is absolutely different than what you're using today and absolutely will most likely be very different than what you may use in the future. More than half of the nonprofit surveyed said they offered new giving options to their donors. Fundraisers responded with creativity and the internet lit up with creative virtual fundraising events. More than half of the nonprofits moved their events to a digital format. Virtual and hybrid events will continue to feature heavily in the nonprofit fundraising calendars going forward. Almost 70% of nonprofits plan on incorporating virtual participation options in their event schedules, whether they're running hybrid, virtual-only, or a mix of virtual and in-person, nonprofits are focusing on offering virtual participation options to their supporters, and why not? Virtual events are a great option during times of difficulty. They keep donors safe, they make events more widely accessible to people in a variety of circumstances, and they are often associated with lower overhead costs. Relationships play an essential role in the success of any organization, especially those in the nonprofit sector whether it's relationships within your organization, external partners, donors, clients, volunteers, success is dependent on the support from others. We love learning more about what our clients do, what they're passionate about, and how we can make their jobs easier. As Darryl had mentioned, one of our clients Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah inspired us with what they've been able to do to make a difference in the world. We are absolutely happy to help them. While going from in-person to virtual can be a jarring experience, it can also be smooth and seamless with the right tools and preparation. Big Brothers Big Sisters Utah started off with their Bowl For Kids' 2020 event as scheduled. They planned a bowling event every Saturday for the month of April. Due to the pandemic, they realized they wouldn't be able to hold their event as planned and they needed to do something. They pivoted to a virtual Do Something for Kids' Sake. It was a four-month hybrid event with supporters doing any kind of activity. It could be hiking, biking, knitting, singing, you name it, even napping, if you believe that. You name it, they did it. All to support the organization and the valuable work that they do. You may be curious to know how the 2021 event went. They did go back to in-person. They did make it a two-month bowling event reaching 88% of a $55,000 goal and they saw about 72 registrants, 81 teams, and 224 donors. When you look at 2020 and compare it to 2021, it appears that they actually had a higher engagement with the virtual format. Given that success with this peer-to-peer event, they did decide to go ahead and also try and host a 2020 annual auction virtually. Each fall, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah hosts what they call Chef and Child, but in 2020, they pivoted their annual gala to an online virtual event called A Magical Night In. They opted to make the event free for all attendees and they had a creative and yummy option for attendees upgrading their experience by purchasing a VIP interactive basket or an in-home chef experience for that added touch of magic. Some highlights, they live-streamed their event on Facebook Live. They made sure to showcase some of the unique auction items shown here. There's a custom mural or a trip to St. Thomas. They told their story by showcasing video footage of littles and bigs in action and how Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah had changed their lives reminding the supporters of the participation. Interestingly, they surpassed their goal. Sometimes seeing is believing, so we asked our friend Kristi Curtis, event manager at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah to share a bit about the switch to virtual fundraising with us. Darryl, if you would, please. Darryl: Okay, we're just going to queue up the meeting here. I'm just double-checking with my tech, Ryan, I'm not sure if you're actually able to go ahead and add that to the stream. All right, the queuing for the video appears to just not want to jump in there. Let me make a few adjustments here. Ryan, let us know if you're able to get that thing going. I'll go explore a possible option here. All right, I'm thinking what we might want to do is let's see if we can get this a little bit functional but to not consume the time of the people that are in our room at this point. Kim, if you could maybe just touch on-- You did definitely hit on some of the points as far as what Big Brothers Big Sisters was able to achieve with the virtual events. If you could maybe just give it some bits and pieces of the closure while we work on seeing if we can queue this up. Kimberly: Sure, absolutely. Kristi who wasn't able to join us live today had been kind enough to record with us and we asked her a couple of key questions. Really, what the jump to virtual was about? How did it go? Will they use it going forward? The auction event just so you know ended up being the second highest-grossing event that they've ever had. For a first-time virtual event, that was very impressive. Kristi also shared that she was pretty much a skeptic. She was not one in the organization to have opted to go virtual or hybrid, and then once the team there, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah started talking, they really started thinking going virtual is the only way that they could have control. It sounds like I'm hearing her voice. Do you want me to keep going, Darryl? Darryl: I think we're going to just see what we can queue up here. Kimberly: She's going to say it so much better than I can. Darryl: Yes, all right. Let me see if I can actually get my tab here going. Hey, Ryan, would you be able to-- Oh, I see what we're doing here. Give me the ability to share my screen. Ryan: Hey, I'm sorry, did you send the request? I can have you share your screen, Darryl. Darryl: Yes, it's actually displayed out for the present now button. Ryan: Yes, because I've got Kimberly's screen still sitting here. Because Kimberly's is queued up in here, it may only allow me to share hers. Darryl: Got you. Kimberly, I'm curious if you can go ahead and grab the tab and show via YouTube? Kimberly: Well, let's see. Hopefully, you can hear it. Darryl: Yes, I was thinking you might want to put the link in a separate tab in your browser, would that be okay? Kimberly: At this point, let me just recap the video and hopefully maybe you can send out a copy of it to everyone. I think the big things, I did include a recap here, it's that the Big Brothers Big Sisters Utah team did really a great job of being creative and innovative. They used technology to pivot very quickly and they saved two popular events, the peer-to-peer and the auction, popular and prosperous from being canceled. They made the jump to hybrid and virtual, they moved to an open virtual registration format, and with a few small tweaks, they created two very inclusive events that garnered more support. As I was sharing, unfortunately, you're not going to hear it from her but their auction was the second-highest fundraiser in the history of the organization. Successfully engaging their supporters, they included having a big and a little match, share their personal story, they utilized their database. They made sure to do personal outreach and phone calls to previous year supporters asking for participation. They involved supporters by sharing their fund-a-need. They definitely used our thermometers and they had an overall event thermometer and a fund-a-need thermometer with the goals and status in live streams and they really found that helped motivate folks in the end. In summary, what I really wanted to cover is that virtual and hybrid events have proven to be great additions to the calendar. For nonprofits, that means more opportunities to fundraise without breaking the bank or sweat. Virtual events have proven flexible, cost-effective, and easily planned versus their in-person counterpart. Even though people are looking forward to reconnecting at traditional galas and parties, having a virtual fundraising event in the arsenal certainly does not hurt. Unlike their in-person events, virtual events are accessible to more people. No matter the current state of affairs, with this format, you are able to host your planned fundraising event. There will always be fixed cost but this format has no travel costs, venue set up, event breakdown, fees. It reduces or eliminates costs like decor, gift bags, music, catering, venue rental. It really does offer the option to be creative, making it into a new event. The virtual audience has so many distractions. We're seeing some today, so it's great to basically bring those folks in as part of an actual experience. Having an annual flagship event is never a bad idea but just in case the timing doesn't work, having a virtual event in a rotation gives your supporters more options to attend and support you. In-person events are more challenging to keep track of the activity of each attendee but the virtual event offers real-time user activity, data, and contact information. It gives planners more time to focus on event programming, building sponsorship, and creating a smooth attendee experience, and also, technology offers the limitless way to help build sponsor packages. Those are the highlights of a virtual and a hybrid event. All of the information that Big Brothers Big Sisters Utah collected from their participants and donors during the event was captured in Qgiv and exported into their DonorPerfect CRM to fill out donor profiles and giving history. The integration is pretty straightforward with just a few main steps but there are a ton of customization options so you can be sure your data is flowing into DonorPerfect properly based on your different use cases. On the back-end of Qgiv, setting up the integration is really simple. You can easily configure the integration to map the data collected on Qgiv forms to the appropriate campaign or solicitation in DonorPerfect with the mapping interface that you see here. You can also add custom mappings. These mappings allow you to dictate which target objects and fields you want data to go into DonorPerfect. There's three custom mapping types: static, custom field, and standard field. For each type, you can map to a target object plus field using the data from that custom type. It's a simple thing to set up to export donor contacts from Qgiv events and auctions into DonorPerfect. Event and auction attendee status in DonorPerfect is updated automatically when changed in Qgiv to make creating and tracking these records easy across your Qgiv and DonorPerfect accounts. I'm sure many of you aren't web designers. I know I'm not. It's great and we do need to make changes on the fly with these events. Big Brothers Big Sisters Utah found that in their peer-to-peer event builder, it made it very easy for them to switch things quickly from the live event over to a virtual format. The simple drag and drop capabilities of the system save them time and money that it would have taken if they'd had to hire a third party to help. Additionally, through Qgiv and DonorPerfect, they were able to easily segment participants and reach out to them through phone, direct mail, email, and social media. They targeted those who were registered for the event and reached out, leading up to the event to encourage participation and fundraising activity. Now that the segment or the event is actually over last year's auction, they're going to be doing another auction this year, but they're able to take all that information, segment their outreach to thank those who participated and donated during their event. Managing a nonprofit takes patience, hard work, and above all, a lot of organization. It's important to put the time into searching for the right online fundraising platform and that has so much potential to boost your fundraising efforts. There's so much to consider when choosing your digital fundraising partner and we appreciate that DonorPerfect did the research vetting and due diligence in selecting Qgiv as one of their technology partners for their customers. Whether you work with us now or in the future, we are here to help. As I mentioned earlier in the presentation, Qgiv has been helping nonprofits organizations implement and grow their online fundraising programs since 2007. As the importance of online giving has grown, our mission has remained the same and that is to help others fulfill their passion to make a difference. You are at the center of everything we do. Our fundraising technology is designed to help you attract and retain more donors, save time, and raise more money by offering multiple ways of giving. Our comprehensive suite of powerful online fundraising tools includes donation forms, event registration, text fundraising and messaging, peer-to-peer fundraising, and auctions with mobile bidding. We also offer time-saving integrations with industry-leading CRMs like DonorPerfect, also email automation tools, accounting programs, and matching gift platforms. Nonprofits like you can easily export your donor data from Qgiv into DonorPerfect and into the third-party programs you use to cultivate donor relationships and send out segmented communications. You heard a little bit, unfortunately, not seeing everything from Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah, but what you hopefully garnered was that just the things that they did were just a small sampling of what our platform can help you do all with no long-term contracts, try as you go options. You can experiment with new fundraising tools in these newly navigated times of virtual and hybrid events. Qgiv loves being part of the nonprofit community and we appreciate being recognized as a partner and leader in the nonprofit space. We exist to help people fulfill their passion to make a difference. You heard a little bit about the software platform, but we also wanted to share that we have a robust resource center with limitless fundraising resources, best practices. Those are free for anyone, anytime, and you don't have to be a customer to use them. Take advantage of blog articles, eBooks, templates, case studies, webinars, email series, and tips. We really do hope that you check us out. If you do have a fundraising need, let us know, we are here to help, and we've covered a lot in our time together. You may still have questions about whether or not this platform is a good fit for you or your organization, so if you haven't already, please go ahead and submit your questions, and thank you. That's all I have today. Darryl: Awesome. Thank you so much, Kim, and our apologies for not being able to actually stream that video. We'll make sure that everybody that has been in attendance here gets a link and you'll be able to hear from Big Brothers Big Sisters Utah, as far as how they were able to make their decisions from virtual to live events and what the impact was. I see one question coming in the chat asking about whether the integration in DonorPerfect and the appropriate fields, is it direct or is it by CSV? There is actually an API integration where the data does flow automatically from Qgiv into DonorPerfect. There's actually a field mapping tool but they built so that even certain custom user-defined fields can come across from the active event, fundraising pages. Great question. Any others for Qgiv or perhaps, maybe even as it relates to virtual fundraising and your experiences in terms of making the decision as to whether to go virtual hybrid or to actually bring back a live event this year, we'd be happy to make that a part of our conversation today. Feel free to go ahead and enter that in the general chat. Kim, I was just wondering from what you had heard from Big Brothers and Big Sisters, their future strategy with this, does it sound like they're going to be doing more hybrids or you had also mentioned sort of splitting out and almost adding events, some of which might be virtual to complement existing ones? Is that going to be instead of a hybrid that they give a feel for based on that? Kimberly: I think they're going to do a little bit of both. What they ended up doing was they reduced their overall event goal for the Bowl For Kids' Sake this year, added a couple of smaller events. I think they're going to, as long COVID permitting to keep the Bowl For Kids' Sake in-person go ahead and do their auction as a hybrid format and then introduce a couple of total virtual events as we go forward. Darryl: Great. One of the questions that came up as to what kind of auction support is Qgiv provide. You can talk about whether is that an online bidding, real-time. Kimberly: I know Brendan's on the call and I know he wanted to help out, so Brendan, do you want to feel the auction question for me? Brendan Smith: From a support standpoint, we are getting back to a lot more folks getting back to in-person events, so we are opening that up. We have in-person support options, as well as remote options. We can be there for you either remotely in the case of a quick call is something that can help, or if you're more comfortable with us being in-person to help with any support needs, we have those options as well. Darryl: Great. Any other questions for Qgiv? I see one in there about mapping categories. What were the two custom mapping categories? I don't know if that was specific down to two. I thought there was some pretty broad capabilities that might've been in the most recent release though. I don't know if you want to touch a little bit on that. Brendan: Yes, I mentioned [unintelligible 00:27:04], we can happily share all of the mapping options that our integration has and I know if you're working with this already got access to the great help desk that we have, so I can certainly follow up, but to your point, really there's a lot of options to be able to map accordingly and be able to make sure that the data is flowing seamlessly into DonorPerfect and landing where you want it and need it to land so that you can continue to cultivate and build on those relationships you're establishing. Darryl: Awesome. All right. Well, thank you all, and again, we'll make sure that that link goes out so that everybody can see what Big Brothers and Big Sisters was considering as they went with Qgiv platform and how they implemented it. This time, I'd like to move to the second segment. Joining us today is Michelle Milford, the Marketing and Communication Manager from Humane Animal Welfare Society, HAWS at Waukesha, Wisconsin. Michelle graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a Bachelor of Arts in Zoology and Environmental Studies in 2013. Shortly after, completed master's coursework in Sustainable Management from museum work to environmental advocacy to community commerce. Her entire career has been in the nonprofit sector. Michelle will certainly be speaking from the perspective of HAWSA, but also with her today, we have Josh Bloomfield, who is the Founder and CEO, and a puppy lover apparently, was a HAWS client. Josh from Waukesha. Josh Bloomfield: Thanks, Darryl, you stole my thunder introducing Michelle, but yes, sorry, this is the little one that barked there during the intro, sorry about that. Thank you guys for joining the DonorPerfect community for the DonorPerfect conference. First off, I want to send loads of gratitude and thankfulness for everything your world changes are up to you, especially in the face of a very different world we live in. I hope our session encourages you. I'm Josh, the Founder and CEO of Givecloud and I won't be presenting today, instead, we've asked an incredible woman, Michelle Milford, to share her experience using both DonorPerfect and Givecloud to centralize the wildly diverse things her and her team do at the Humane Animal Welfare Society. Aside from Michelle's impressive education, inspiring advocacy, and community involvement, Michelle understands the importance of streamlining systems and processes to simplify her team's operations and focus every minute and every dollar on her mission. Without any further ado, please welcome Michelle Milford. Michelle Milford: Hi. Thank you guys so much. Thank you for the intro. I don't think I've ever had an intro like that, so thank you. I'm looking at the comments quick and can you see there's Clyde, he's an English Setter sitting in the back there, so he's here with us too but he's sleeping. I'll go ahead and get started. Can you guys see my screen? Darryl: Not yet. I'm not sure. Ryan, are you able to pick up on the request that Michelle put in to share? Michelle: Maybe I can try it again too. Ryan: Yes, if you could try requesting to present your screen again. Darryl: There we go. Ryan: Here we go. Michelle: Perfect. I'm Michelle Milford with HAWS and I've been asked to talk about-- [silence] Josh: Is Michelle muted? Ryan: Yes, somehow she's muted. Hold on, Michelle. There you go. Michelle: Let's try again. We'll go back. Better? Darryl: Looks good. Michelle: I'm Michelle Milford with HAWS and I have been asked to talk about how we at our organization are diversifying our strategy to build community. Who is HAWS? We're the Humane Animal Welfare Society, we're an open admission, no-kill shelter dedicated to strengthening the relationship between animals and humans through adoptions and education, making a more compassionate community possible. That last bit is really important, especially for this community conference. As I go through my slides, I want you guys to think about what kind of community are you reaching? Who are you reaching in your community and what kind of community do you want to build? For us, we want a kind, compassionate, respectful community that is that way towards their animals and towards their people. What challenges brought us here? By here, I mean to Givecloud and to DonorPerfect, which we started using about 11 months ago. We're still new-ish users. We were really looking for a solution to combine all of our diverse needs and also reach all of our donor segments. We have a lot going on at HAWS and we're growing very quickly. We realized that what we were previously implementing, wasn't doing what we needed it to do. Then because of that too, like you said, we have a multitude of programs. We have education programs, we have behavior programs, we've run our own private dog park. We have all these things that we use to attract and retain donors, but previously, it was all over the place. The next point there, we didn't have any brand cohesion. We were using some forms for PDFs, some more on doc forms, some more hosted on our website. We just really lacked cohesion there. Specifically, related to DonorPerfect. We lacked a robust donor database. Being an animal welfare organization, we had an animal CRM that we were trying to use as a donor CRM as well. Obviously, it didn't work because we made the switch, it's just been fantastic. The last point here about what brought us here is that we needed solutions to reduce our manual entry and our follow-up. Through Givecloud, we're able to do a lot of automation and completely get rid of that manual entry. Then of course, especially with how 2020 went, we're shifting to digital. Our whole world is shifting over there. We want to make sure that we're keeping up with the times. I'm sure other nonprofits want that as well. How do we build community with diversity? The first thing that we do is identify who. We need to understand who our supporters are, what they look like, who our donors are, and how are we going to segment them out. What we did is we segmented our donors and our supporters a couple of different ways. We've mapped it out through their ages and demographics, but then also their interests and how they want to engage with us. I think that's a really important part is how are donors engaging with us, what do they want from us, what do they want to see from us, et cetera. After we identified who, we, in order to build a bigger community, decided that we needed to embrace more variety. We needed to offer more programs and more initiatives, more events, so that we're really covering everyone within our community and our supporters. Then related to that is that timely connections there. We need to connect with our supporters where they're at in their lives, as it relates to our mission. I've had to think about that as right now, I'm a mother and I'm a working mom. What would I go to HAWS for? For me, I would maybe go there to adopt a pet, but also to check out their education programs, or maybe their training. Right now, I'm not really thinking about planned giving. That's the timely connections is that you're offering what your donors need at that time. Then of course, the last bit, in order to do that, we got to invest in some technology. I think that that's really what a DonorPerfect and Givecloud helped us elevate is that we finally have the right tech to do what we need to do. What I'm going to do is go through some of that tech right now, some of the wonderful features that Givecloud allows us to use through their platform. Then we can chat about it a little bit. This page is a split fund page. We use it for gift designations. As you can see, we have a bunch of different gifts here. There's the Annie's medical fund, animal care, and adoptions, animal rescue, behavior department, et cetera. What we're doing here is offering our donors a choice. This audience is really for donors who have a preference towards a specific part of our mission. There's something that they're really passionate about. We want to make sure that they're able to give towards that. Of course, in the nonprofit field, we all really loved the unrestricted gifts, but that's not always what donors want to give to. This is one of my favorite pages. I also love personally that a donor can come here and see everything that we do. They might not know that we do animal rescue until they get to this page and say, "Oh my gosh, I came here to give to Annie's medical fund, but oh my God, now I'm going to give to animal rescue too." The way gift card is set up, it's a cart-like, so they can add all this to their cart and then check out, which is really cool. The other thing we've noticed with this in terms of the impact is that we see higher donation amounts, I think because they have more choices, they're giving to multiple funds. Then for us, way less admin time. Givecloud integrates seamlessly into DonorPerfect. Each one of these has its own GL that I have set up and it just goes right in. Prior to that, we had to go back, we had to go into our system, and change the GL and stuff. It was incredibly inefficient. Another fun one here is their event item page and we use this for programs. Like I said, we had education programs, we run events, we also have behavior and training. A huge struggle that we had, I touched on them a little bit before, is that our programs or our forums rather, we're all over the place. It's in doc form. We had something posted on the website, some were PDF only, and we needed all of them to be in one place. This did it for us. This created easier-to-use forms with-- From a donor standpoint or a user standpoint, that was huge. We want you to be able to sign up for our programs easily and have no questions. Then again, brand consistency. Again, that was a big piece to this too. You can see that there are colors around here and the fonts we want, we can control that and we can customize all of that. Then I wrote their cross-program signups. On the bottom in the right-hand side, it says register and add another child. I love this feature. If they put in their information for their child and then hit that, it'll take them back to the full program list. Maybe for this program, they're going to register Sally, who's four years old and wants to be in this program, but then they'll go back and they'll register Adam who's seven years old and he wants to go to camp. Then it'll all go in their cart. They don't have to register Sally, go through the whole thing, and then go back and register their son. They can do it all at once. Again, less admin time. They have email automation. All of the emails get taken care of for us. We don't have to do any of that. Then again, all of the coding goes right into DonorPerfect. The other thing too, that's really cool about this is, because of the way that the integration works is I can say, on the DonorPerfect side, anyone who signed up for this program, I wanted them put them on my email list through Constant Contact, so that I can let them know when we have more programs coming up. I love that too. This is a fun one, this is one that we kind of got creative with. This is Givecloud's peer-to-peer fundraising page and I think typically it's used to kind of what I'm showing here. There's a campaign that we're fundraising for, in this instance, it was our ramping rally. Madison here put together a collage of her and all the pets that she's worked with, and then people who support her support our work and donate specifically to her page. It's super custom, which is awesome. How we got kind of creative with this as we actually started using it for our corporate partners. We have a lot of corporate partners who like to do fundraising for us within their organization. We could set it up as a campaign and then you kind of get this like, employee, "Oh, well, my co-worker games, I'm going to give different things. They're kind of fun." Why I love this is that we get to control the narrative. I know a lot of people like to do the peer-to-peer funders into Facebook, which is good and it can be impactful. The problem with Facebook fundraising is you don't get any information on the donors. They'll give and all you get is a name. You don't get an address or an email or phone, you can't thank them and you can't solicit in the future. I love this for that reason that it gives you the option to have these people in your database. This is a good point here for in terms of building community. We've never been able to offer e-commerce or like a shot before until we got Givecloud and we're so happy we did it. This is great for supporters that want a tangible benefit. They want something almost something in return for their donation or for people who want to feel a part of the HAWS team. We're able to put up all of our T-shirts and then what this is done less staff time, it's streamlined the process, we're reaching so many more people, and it's free advertising, right? The people are walking around with our T-shirts that have HAWS written all over it. Someone might ask them, "Oh, where did you get that et cetera?" We love, love this feature that we can sell shirts through Givecloud and other stuff too if you have other kind of merch, you can sell whatever you would like. Other thing I want to mention about that too, in terms of the integration, we had run into a problem before about taxes and this is really great because it keeps the taxes separate. There's the shirt cost and then the taxes will be on its own. We don't have to do any of the work of trying to apply taxes or anything like that. Then tributes, I know many nonprofits offer tribute gifts. It's huge. This audience is really interesting audience because primarily, it's one-time donors. Unfortunately, a loved one or someone had passed away and in the family that asks for gifts to be made in their honor. This is where they would come for that and what I love about Givecloud platform for this is that we can offer many different options. You can see we do a normal tribute gift which will essentially just be a street donation but then we also have recognition options, the tile, the brick, the memorial plaques. What this has done for us at least is created a higher quality donor experience. Even though a lot of these people are only coming to us to make a one-time gift, I want to make sure that they're even if it's one time that they're one time with us is impactful and it's a positive experience and it was easy. That's the whole thing kind of like with Givecloud is why we chose to go with them, it's because it's easy to use and it's easy to use on the front end as a donor but, on the back end, it's even easier. I have a ton of, I would say, not tech-savvy team members and they can use it no problem. Membership pages. I hope you've kind of seen a theme here at least is like we're doing a lot and we have a lot of options for people to give to. That's kind of where we're going with in terms of trying to build a community is that we have so many different ways that people can support HAWS and give to HAWS and membership is another great one. This audience is primarily like our loyal members, who want to give annually. What I love about Givecloud here is that we can set up membership in a variety of different ways. We can do a yearly gift, monthly gift, and then a one-time gift. What we've noticed, laying these out this way is that more members are choosing the recurring gifts, which reduces our need to send reminders and mailings. That has been incredibly impactful for us because it takes a lot to send out those renewals. If they're already queued up to give each year, it's a win for us. Then lastly, is digital downloads. This was brand new to us with COVID, unfortunately, but the goal here [unintelligible 00:45:44] was to stay relevant in an increasingly tech-centric world, right? We knew right away, because of COVID, we couldn't offer our training classes, we couldn't do our education programs, it just wasn't going to happen and we were going to lose out on a ton of revenue. What we did, instead of doing like a virtual event, where people would log in at a certain time and watch the video, we use downloads. I can't speak to other platforms, but I thought this was pretty cool on Givecloud that they gave us this ability. Essentially, what a person would do is they would sign up for basic manners class, and then they get an email straight to their email box with a digital download that would have our curriculum, it would have homework for them in there, and it would have videos. It took away all of the kind of need for us to have the events a little bit. We kind of cheated, but what is great about this is that every market is now being included because even though, things are opening back up, we found a lot of people just prefer this. This is how they want to learn or this is how they want to engage with us. They don't necessarily want to come to the shelter, or maybe their schedule won't allow them to. Maybe they're just kind of introverted and they want to stay home. We like that a lot. All that said, what does success look like for us? When we're thinking about Givecloud, specifically, it's that we need a beautiful cohesive website, and a digital experience, so that we can build trust within our community and continue to grow. I think, I suppose this is anecdotal but just based on what I've seen in there are short under a year with both Givecloud and DonorPerfect, we've grown a ton and we've had much great feedback about how the site looks, how easy it is to use, and all that good stuff. Then specific to DonorPerfect, a solid donor database, helps build community through ongoing engagement and understanding of supporters. Again, because of this super seamless integration, we're able to then take everything, all the information that we get from the forms, which had a lot of custom fields on, and throw that all into DonorPerfect, so that we can use all that great information at the later date. I think that just about does it, I think we're going to go into a Q&A now. Darryl: Awesome, thank you, Michelle, for that and your organization is a great example of how to expand the diversity of fundraising and giving something for everyone. I guess I was curious from my perspective, you introduced some new things. Did you see strength in terms of the dollars raised, particularly on the digital download piece where you got any educational components? That was brand new this year, is that right? Michelle: Yes, brand new to us. I don't know for Josh if it was brand new to Givecloud, but yes, we did. I would say now, we're definitely moving away from that. People want to get back into person, but like I said, there's still people who are choosing it. For us, there's no admin, we don't have to send a staff member there to teach the class. It's already all put together, we just throw it to your inbox. It was really good in terms of saving on staff time. Darryl: Excellent. That's creative. We get to see a lot of different nonprofit fundraising techniques and we've certainly been aware of the digital downloads, but oftentimes, we've seen that as content that may have been digitized from some other format, but for you to be able to create brand new fresh content like that, I think is a really fresh approach to this, as well as your corporate perspective on doing some of that crowdfunding piece while we call it crowdfunding. It was a good idea. Any questions from the crowd? Certainly, it has been a very thought-provoking presentation. I think we're in a time where if you are a nonprofit, that all you have is an online fundraising form, it may be time to expand a little bit and to try some other things. I know the nonprofit where I serve, we do two events a year and the rest of it is direct mail and online fundraising forms. We're talking at the board level to try and figure out how to diversify that, and yet not make too much activity that you end up getting donor fatigue out of it. Maybe one question for you, Michelle was, as you introduced some of these new avenues for fundraising, how did you promote them? Was it just through constant contact email? Did you do Facebook posts to point people back or was there some other method that actually really works for you to get the attention of people? Michelle: Yes, so we did a lot of Constant Contact. What I like about Constant Contact is that we are able to segment out, so we have a ton of different lists in there, email lists, so then when we're sending out a specific email blast, I can send it to a specific list. The worst possible thing is to overload our supporters. Like you said, you don't want them to get fatigued or definitely you don't want them to unsubscribe. That's urgh. [chuckles] Then in terms of Facebook, we use Facebook a lot to get the word out, but we do a lot of-- I like to call my double posts almost, so what I'll do is I'll post an adoptable dog and then I'll say, "Oh, this dog's available for adoption and they are an Australian Shepherd breed that would really excel at our agility classes," and then link to agility. I'm reaching adopters that way, people who are interested in adopting, and then I'm also reaching people who might be interested because then that prompts them to say, "I have an Australian Shepherd or whatever breed it is, I should take agility." We do a lot of that where we'll like-- because we know we have so much going on, I try to hide little nuggets in here and there. Darryl: Sounds good. Do you also end up keeping things fresh on your website as far as long posts and things of that? Or do you just rely on more Facebook to give that that more up-to-date content? Michelle: Yes, so we just re-did our website. I believe it was April is when we redid it, so it's pretty brand spanking new, and blog posts is on my list of things to do, so we will get to that, but yes, definitely. I think anytime that you can direct people to your website, you should. That anytime you post on social media, make sure that you're putting your website in there. You need to always be sending people there. Darryl: Got you. Have you experimented with any paid ads on Facebook to try and drive attention up? Michelle: Yes, we have and it does well. The research that I've done on Facebook though, and again, this is just my own research that I've done, so take it at face value, is that Facebook likes you to spend at least a hundred dollars a month is part of their algorithm for you to really see a benefit on it and it's not hard to do that by any means to spend a hundred dollars. I do think it's worth the investment in general. I would just be really strategic about what it is that you're promoting. Darryl: Got you. With all the tools that you have in Givecloud, what's the next promotion that you plan to do either for a fundraising campaign or an event? What's coming up? Michelle: Oh, I haven't think about that. Yes, what is coming up? I don't know. Well, we put items on sale on our e-commerce shop and, holy man, did those go. Just saying sale, it was like those sold out and it was a $3 sale. [chuckles] That was really interesting. Even in the nonprofit world, I think that's important to know that your donors still think like consumers. We are hard-wired to want a deal and to want to know exactly what our money is getting us. I think that, that-- I don't know if that really answered your question at all, but it's another tip just for people to think about. Darryl: It's helpful. Just to understand how you're approaching the what are you going to do next and what campaigns are working for you and what did you just come off of to keep it fresh to your donors? Josh, I guess we've certainly covered a good bit of ground in terms of the feature set with Givecloud cloud can do. What would you add as far as what you're seeing some of the other Givecloud clients doing right now during this time? Josh: Wow. To your question, we've got a handful of organizations who've pivoted to virtual events and so we were able to develop a giving template where instead of the giving being the center part of the experience, your virtual event is. Off to the right, you've got your giving and you've got emojis that your supporters can click as and react to your event. You've got live chat in there as well, so it's our way of helping organizations pivot and they've had some success. I think one of the things we've learned though is that running an event takes a lot of effort, and so to think that you can just throw on your webcam and throw on a virtual event is wishful thinking, but we have had organizations who make the right investment in producing a virtual event coupled with that ability to have chats and so on, coupled with the fact that every interaction that happens there is represented live inside their DonorPerfect system, seen some really great success. Darryl: Excellent. You certainly had great success with that virtual platform right upon release. I think you launched it to a very large nonprofit that had a huge, huge response. Is that something that you continue to see or do you feel that virtual's not going to go away, but is the enthusiasm of it filling in the gaps as opposed to being the headline? Josh: Yes, that's a good question. It's tough. I feel like we all have a pretty big craving to get back to life the way it was. I think one of the things that was really special about that event was the individual who hosted it, high-impact celebrity who spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on producing that event. They had an incredible outcome. They raised, I think $750,000 in a single evening through that experience. Again, I fall back to-- I think what a lot of nonprofits are learning is that, doing that virtual event and that virtual content can be tough, and the quicker we can just get back to doing things the way they used to be able to do it is the vibe I'm getting from a lot of our customers. Darryl: Got you. Sounds good. All right. Well, with that, we're at the end of our session. I want to thank everyone for attending and listening in to what the future of events and virtual fundraising is bound to be. Thank you so much, Michelle, Josh, Kim, Brendan, our whole team here. We are now headed for a 15-minute break. During that time, please feel free to visit the Givecloud and get a booze, stop in at their lounges, have a one-on-one chat with them, and I think you're going to be able to pick up a whole bunch more in terms of what we were able to cover here. It looks like the puppies may also visit as well. Thanks so much, everyone, and we'll see you at the next session. Michelle: Thank you. Brendan: Thanks, everyone. [00:58:57] [END OF AUDIO]

Donor Retention/Getting Second Gifts Part 1

Many nonprofits gained an unprecedented number of new donors in 2020, but motivating them to make their second donation can be difficult.

Donor Retention/Getting Second Gifts Part 1

Description

Many nonprofits gained an unprecedented number of new donors in 2020, but motivating them to make their second donation can be difficult. We realize the challenges and opportunities this presents for your nonprofit sector, and we can help you move forward with purpose. Let’s strategize together to strengthen these relationships with the help of DonorPerfect.

Transcript

speaker: All right, it looks like we are finally live. We are excited to be here. Welcome to our session where we are going to be talking about donor retention, but specifically, looking at ideas and ways you can use DonorPerfect to convert those first-time donors to second-time donors. I am Kelly Ramage and I am joined by two of my amazing colleagues, Sarah and Amanda. Between all of us, we believe that we are going to have fun, we are going to learn, perhaps be reminded of some great options in DonorPerfect. Hopefully, we will be able to address all of the questions that you bring to our attention, you ask us, but our goal is that you're going to walk away with some really great ideas to put into practice. We are talking about donor retention. One of the things that comes to mind when we think about donor retention is the relationship that you have between you and your donors. You have heard a lot about the relationship between your organization and your donors' transformation. Really, I guess transformational fundraising is really a fundamental piece of just overall fundraising, but I think coming out of the pandemic, it has really become something that we've been reminded and refreshed about. There's a lot of ways that we can think about donor relationships, but when it comes to donor retention, especially focusing on first-time donors, we think that dating is a good analogy. We're going to start our conversation with the question, what's your donor relationship status? If you were to just pause for 10 seconds and think about that, how would you rate yourself as an organization in your engagement and the relationship that you have, not just with all donors or major donors but your first-time donors? On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate yourself? You don't need to answer that or post that anywhere, but that just something to think about? As we think about donor retention, I think everybody probably in the group is aware that currently, the donor retention rate is hovering right around 43%. I'm wondering if you are aware of what the donor retention rate is for first-time donors? According to AFP, it is a very small number. It's 19%. Now, you might be thinking, 19%, is it worth it? Let me just throw out one more number. Did you know that 63% of donors who contribute, not five gifts but just a second gift, that that donor retention rate becomes 63%? That's a pretty amazing number and that's above the average retention rate. To me, this means we have huge opportunities to engage new donors. I'm actually going to turn this over to Sarah and Amanda so that they can show you some really great ways that you can consider using DonorPerfect to help engage those first-time donors. Just a couple of things. As we get started here, keep in mind that there is a handout, there's probably two hopefully posted at the bottom, so you have to scroll down to the bottom of your screen to find the two handouts that are available. If you don't see them, you may need to refresh your screen and get them there. If they're not there, you can go to the Resource Center and you'll find them there. You can always reach out to the training team at any point and we can get you that information as well. The second thing is that there are going to be two polls, so you should be aware of that as we move forward and because we're going to be going back and forth between slides and DonorPerfect, and we realize that when our faces are on the screen, it makes DonorPerfect a little small, we're going to be visible, and then we're going to go away, and we're going to come back. Just know that nothing's wrong with our technology, it's just that we're trying to optimize slides in DonorPerfect in the best way possible. Amanda and Sarah, I'm turning it over to you and everybody in the audience, enjoy our session. speaker: All right, thank you so much, Kelly, and, Sarah, I'm just going to have you go to the next slide. Thank you. Knowing that first-time donors who make a second contribution have a 63% retention rate is really a strong motivator to come up with a strategy for engaging those new donors, but before you could come up with that strategy, we have to identify who those constituents are in DonorPerfect. DonorPerfect has four fields that are available to you to help answer that question of who my first-time donors are. Initial gift date which will tell you the date of their first gift, initial gift amount which will tell you the amount that was donated, number of gifts which will help you identify first-time donors that have given just one gift or maybe have already given a second gift, and the first gift checkbox which gets checked automatically when you enter a donor's first contribution. Each one of these fields gets updated automatically by DonorPerfect and each one of those fields can be incorporated into a report or into a filter to answer that question of who are my first-time donors. What I'm going to do is turn it over to Sarah. She's going to go into DonorPerfect, show you where those fields are, and show you how you can incorporate them into a filter. Sarah, if you want to use donor ID 452. speaker: Perfect. Right here, I'm just in a record in DonorPerfect. I'm just scrolling down to this section called the "giving an engagement profile". That's the name of the section in my system. It could be named something else in yours. Most of these fields that you see here come with all DonorPerfect systems and the ones I'm going to talk about definitely do. The first field we were talking about was the initial gift date right here. I've got the number of gifts letting me know how many gifts this person has given. I also have the initial gift amount right here. Those three fields are telling me when this person made their first gift. If I'm trying to run a report, which we'll do in a moment, I'm going to be able to use this in a filter to find the list of donors. If I'm looking at the gift itself, so the second field that Amanda mentioned, or I guess the second category, was that checkbox on the gift screen. When I'm looking here at the gift, so the one gift the person has made, I will see here a checkbox that says "first gift" and it is checked "yes". This is telling me this is someone's first gift. Again, I could use a filter that is in a report that is based on gifts to find all of my first gift donors. If we go to the report center to see how we do this report, and if you do not have those fields, the four fields I just spoke about, you can get them. Those fields come with your system, they're potentially not displayed and you'll have access in the screen designer to just mark them as displayed. They come with all DonorPerfect systems. If I'm looking here and I was to run a gift report with that specific checkbox, I'm going to go to the gifts by date example. Here, I'm going to specify a date range. I'm going to leave this current date range here which saying I want to find all my first-time donors this year. I'm going to go ahead and say show me the first gifts that my first-time donors have made. I'm going to apply a selection filter, I'm going to add a new filter. Right here, I'm going to go with "gift". What am I looking for? I'm looking for that checkbox that I just showed you, and it's here. I'm going to go with "first gift", checked "yes", continue. I can add more criteria because before continuing, what I want to make sure is that right now I'm looking for my first-time donors that have not yet donated again. I'm going to specify that I only want to find my donors that have a number of gifts here that is exactly equal to one. I'm going to hit continue this time. I'm going to hit done and run this report right now. Always making sure it's clean at the bottom by clearing my values. Let's see what I'm going to find. We should have some people in here. There we go. This is a list of all my first-time gifts that I have received. 57 first-time donors so far this year. This is a very good report that will also tell me how did they first give, what did they give to, what attracted them, and help me reach out to them going forward. I'm going to send this now to Kelly who's going to talk to us about a poll, maybe. speaker: There we go, all right. I have to always wait for those little delays. What we're going to do is we're going to ask you for some information about how you engage with your new donor. If you have not participated in a poll yet in our conference, you're going to find that as an icon on the right-hand side where you find the chat and the Q&A. There should now be a poll there where you should, hopefully, see a question that says, "Which describes the way you engage with new donors?" We only have limited characters for each little answer, so hopefully, they each make sense and you can choose the one that best resonates or represents what you do. Yes, you have to choose one. How do you best engage with your new donors? Definitely, Sarah and Amanda, there's things bumping and jumping around. Nobody has said they don't know who their new donors are, so that's always a win. speaker: That's amazing. speaker: That's fantastic, but the one that's definitely taking the lead is sending a thank you note, but we'll wait about five more seconds. speaker: I'm happy to see that sending a thank you is so high. speaker: Yes. Hopefully, you're doing it in the most efficient way using DonorPerfect. We're going to go ahead and end our poll. By a landslide, we have 85% of everybody who participated saying sending a thank you note is the way that they engage with their new donors. We're going to turn this back over to Sarah and Amanda to talk about other engagement strategies. Amanda, what do we have next? speaker: What we have is lots of different ways that you can utilize DonorPerfect to engage your constituents. We can send a thank you letter or email, which the majority of you are doing, 85% which is exciting. We can send a welcome kit which is 9.5% of you say that you're already doing. We can send video using DonorPerfect videos to add a face to that thank you. We can send out email using the account integration. We can offer them the opportunity to become a volunteer. We can send them a survey asking them details about why they did and what are their preferences around future communications. If we had nothing else then in this [inaudible 00:13:08], of course, we can invite them to join the monthly mentoring program as well. DonorPerfect has in place to help you with each one of these engagement strategies. Over to the next couple of slides, we're going to dive into a little bit detail about each one of these. Starting with saying thank you. I'm excited to [inaudible 00:13:34]. speaker: Hold on for one second here. We're going to try and remove some of the feedbacks. Amanda, it seems maybe it is-- No, is it all of us? Give us a moment. [pause 00:13:55] speaker: All right, are we still echoing? Yes, we are. [pause 00:14:29] [laughter] speaker: Let's see here. [pause 00:15:03] speaker: Unfortunately, that's technology, sometimes it doesn't work out. [pause 00:15:45] speaker: All right, did that improve things? No. speaker: No. [pause 00:16:29] speaker: All right, it is there. Okay, so I am at a loss for how to correct this. [silence] Give me one moment. I'm waiting to hear from the experts. [pause 00:17:33] Okay, how's the echo now? Are we in business? speaker: I'm not hearing you echo, so that's good. What about me? speaker: I think you are good. speaker: All right, as much as I like hearing my voice over and over and over again, it's nice to only hear it one time in this context. speaker: All right, so just as an FYI, I'm going to monitor this and I think I'm going to keep our faces off the screen and maybe that will be part of the solution. We are here, you'll hear the beautiful voices, but I think we are good to go. speaker: All right, so going back to that previous slide. all of these items that are listed on this slide are great strategies that you can implement to engage your first-time donors. While we certainly don't expect you to use every single one of them, we're hoping that by the end of the presentation, you're going to walk away with one or two ideas as to what you can implement for your new donor engagement strategy. Sarah, I'm going to have you go to the next slide so we can get into more details. Yes. I was so happy to see that 80% of you guys are already thanking your donors because sending a thank you letter to the donor really lets them know first of all that they received your donation, but also that you appreciate them. It's also an excellent opportunity for you guys to communicate the impact that your donation had on the cause that they care about. In fact, 45% of donors said it was an outstanding thank you letter that inspired them to give again, so it really is a diverse piece that's any donor cultivation strategy. Of course, DonorPerfect makes it really easy for you to thank donors directly from the gift record. I'm echoing again. All right, let's see what we can do here really quick. Thank you again, all, for your patience. [pause 00:21:06] We are all muted. [pause 00:21:21] Speaker: All right, we are trying to troubleshoot again, so I'm very sorry and thank you for your patience. [pause 00:21:54] Amanda and Sarah, can you turn off your webcams? Speaker: All right, is that still echoing? Yes, it is because I can hear myself. [silence] All right. [silence] All right, let's see, am I still echoing? Yes, I am, okay. All right. [silence] Speaker: All right, we tried to unplug and plug back in, am I still echoing? Speaker: You are. Speaker: Aargh. [pause 00:23:20] Speaker: All right, how is this everybody? No, I still hear the echo. Sarah, can you try and speak, please? Speaker: Hello? Are you hearing an echo when I speak? [pause 00:24:47] Speaker: Sandra, I'm not hearing an echo when you talk, but I don't know if that's true for our attendees. Speaker: Apparently the echo did not cross the border to Canada. Maybe that's the trick. [chuckles] Okay, well, looks like we're going to go with this for now, and hopefully this is going to stick. I'm not sure where everybody got lost exactly, but we were talking about thinking the donors directly in DonorPerfect, within a gift record, or you could also do automatic monthly receipt. We have a receipt option like the receipt feature that you most likely have used before. You can also do some end-of-year thank yous and receipts. What we're going to do is I'm going to take you to DonorPerfect right now. Maybe, one second. Back where we were before, DonorPerfect, and we're going to go back to look at our first-time donor that I was showing you. I am going to go to her gift and I'm going to show you how you can send the thank you immediately as a gift is entered directly on the gift screen and how you can super easily personalize that gift. We're going to go here into the gift itself. There we go. You have this option over here called "thank donor" where I could send a letter or send an email. I'm going to show you the "send an email" feature. I'm going to click on "send an email". Automatically, the system is going to show me that wonderful here, the "thank your donor, send an email" template here. By default, it's giving me this template called "thank you email" because that's the one I had selected on the thank you letter field on the screen. I can go here and change it. If I didn't have the correct email, I could also change it on the fly right here if I wanted to. The system is telling me who my email is going to come from when it's going to be sent and this is my template. That's not the really powerful thing. The powerful thing is that I can change what I have here and put in a different text a little bit to personalize it. I noticed that this first-time donor chose the health fund, so I'm going to add a little message here about how her gift is going to directly help one of her animals get surgery. Apparently, I'm trying to copy-paste to make it quicker, and then I'm going to include a picture. I could have typed, I copy-paste it. I would include a picture. I'm going to insert image. I'm going to go click here to go find the image on my computer that I'm looking for and here's Chewy. I'm going to include him right here so that I can send that in my email. Then it's as simple as clicking send email right here at the bottom. I'm going to get success, your email is on its way. Super excited about that. It was immediate thank you, sent. The letter will do the same thing, it will generate a word document or a PDF, and then you can send it and also personalize a word document a similar way. I'm going to just switch, going back to the slides, and thank you to the next one. Hopefully, this is still working, everybody can still hear me correctly? Good. Just making sure that everything's still good. The next thing we wanted to talk about was a welcome kit. You could send your donor a welcome package to say, "Thank you so much for choosing us. Here's everything we do." DonorPerfect provides you with a lot of different ebooks and Template kits. This is an example right here of a new donor welcome series email template kit and you can see here we have different options and apparently, I'm probably too zoomed-in right now. Just one second. Let's see if I can show it to you a bit better. There you go. These are the different examples of emails that you can use. You can send that specific welcome pack in constant contact through an automated email campaign. You could also choose that what you're sending is not necessarily automated but more personal. We have the option to create a SmartActions to let you know you could receive an email, to let you have a new donor, or you could have different contact transaction created so that you can see those in DonorPerfect. The next thing that we wanted to talk about was the DP Video. I don't know if any of you have used DP Video yet. I would love to hear your feedback if you have because I think that this is a very amazing feature that is offered where you can send a video update that can add a personal touch to your donor engagement strategy. It's an excellent way to say thank you, provide an update on how a donor's gift is having a positive impact because it has the face-to-face element. I'm going to show you an example right now of a video that was created through DP Video. Hopefully, this audio will also work. [music] Speaker: Hi, Chris. From the teammate at Coral Acres, thank you so much for your very generous gift of $1,000. If it wasn't for you, Andy here would still be waiting for the critical surgery she needed to stop cancer in its tracks. Now she's on the road to recovery and can soon get back to doing regular cat stuff. We can't thank you enough for everything you've done for us over the past 11 years from your contributions that help us build our newest shelter to the over 200 hours you've spent caring for our animals and making them feel loved. You are truly appreciated. Speaker: That was very nice. I would have loved to receive that video personally and see [unintelligible 00:32:20] is doing. You can send these videos directly on the main page in DonorPerfect on the main page of record. Are you trying to speak? Speaker: Yes, so I wanted to wait till you were done. Are we still getting an echo? Speaker: That would be nice. Speaker: Yes. I didn't want to interrupt that great video. I would also have loved to have gotten that. I'm not hearing an echo, so, Sarah, if you want, I can take back over for a bit. Speaker: I'm very happy to let you. As long as it works, let's go with it, right? Speaker: Yes, let's do it. The next two engagement strategies that we're going to talk about are your volunteer opportunities and surveys, and I'll just let Sarah get those slides back up. Speaker: Yes, one second. Speaker: No worries. It's like live feed, you never know what's going to happen, but you just roll with the punches. Speaker: I'm just apparently doing something slowly here. There we go. Speaker: All right, perfect. Another way that you guys could engage your constituency is offering them the opportunity to volunteer with your organization because that's an excellent way to keep them engaged and involved with your mission. On average, about 70% of volunteers will make a donation to the organizations that they work with. You can also potentially consider sending your new donors a special survey. That can be a great way to get valuable insight into what motivated a donor to make their first gift. You can identify the areas or programs that they're invested in, and it's an opportunity to ask that donor how they would like to hear from you in the future with the goal being that you can take all of that information and do additional segmentation for those first-time donors so you're sending them information that's relevant and timely to them. Of course, you can use DonorPerfect's online forums as a way to create this type of survey and then have those responses download directly into that donor's profile. Then, Sarah, I'm going to have you go ahead to the next slide so we can talk about monthly giving. In those communications that you're sending out, you can, of course, always highlight your monthly giving program. This is such an important piece of engagement because based on just DonorPerfect client data alone, monthly donors give 34 times more on average than a one-time donor. I'll pose that question into the chat. Would you rather have a new donor that gives one gift of a hundred dollars but never gives again or a donor who's going to give you $15 a month for the next six years? Of course, you're going to want that $15 for the next six years because it's more money. When you're ready to make that second ask, it might be a good idea to always include that option to have the donor enroll in that monthly giving program. We've covered a lot of excellent strategies to engage your new donors, but eventually, we do have to solicit and ask that donor to give a second gift again. Then that begs the question of, well, when's a good time for me to ask? The answer really is the sooner, the better. In fact, research by AnalyticalOne found that new donors who make a second gift within the first three months have a lifetime value nearly twice as high as those who make a second gift 12 months later. This truly demonstrates that it's worthwhile to invest in in cultivating a second gift early on in your relationship with a new donor. However, what might be surprising is that the value of donors who convert 13 to 24 months after their initial gift. There is a chance that they are going to convert, so if someone doesn't give in that zero to three months, don't give up on them right away because there's still a chance that they're going to give and that their lifetime value will still be significant. However, if the new donor waits 25 plus months to convert to a second donation, then their lifetime value is going to be significantly lower. All of this indicates the need to have strategies in place so that you can encourage that second gift as soon as possible from your newest acquisitions. Keeping that three-month industry recommendation benchmark in mind, we have another poll that we're going to throw up and hopefully, it will not break our presentation. We're asking here, which of these metrics do you think would be most useful to show the success of your engagement strategy for getting a second gift from a donor? We're going to go ahead and give you guys a few moments to respond. That's going to be in that same poll section where you guys took your poll earlier. [silence] All right, so, oh, okay, the numbers shifted a bit. Oh, I'm excited. All right. We're going to go ahead and end that poll real quick here. What we found is that 63% of you are saying all of the above. Time between that first and second gift, knowing how the donor gave their second gift, knowing the last contact that you use to reach out to them, and total dollars raised, those are all important metrics. We did have 33% of you that said time between the first and second gift would be the most important and 3% who said total dollars raised would be the most important metric. The great news is we can look at all of these in DonorPerfect. Sarah, if you go to the next slide, we can show them how. Sorry, so you can use DonorPerfect calculated fields as a way to identify the length of time between the donor's first and second gift, and you can also take a look and see what was the last contact that you had with them that was hopefully that motivation in them becoming a second-time giver. Just like all of the fields in DonorPerfect, they can be incorporated into a report so that you can look at the success of your engagement strategy so that you can prove it was a worthwhile investment to engage those new donors, identify what engagement strategies are resonating the most, and potentially identify some of those areas that maybe you need to improve upon or make tweaks in. Sarah, I'm going to go ahead and turn it over to you and let you show off those great calculated fields and how we can incorporate them into a report. Speaker: Thank you, Amanda. I'm very happy to have you back on board. I'm going to take you to DonorPerfect. We're going to take a look at calculated fields. Calculated fields, there's two categories of them, there are the ones that come with DonorPerfect. I showed you some of those earlier in the presentation, they were found on the main screen, and then there were some that you can create on your own. If I was to go here in "calculated fields", I'm going to see that I have all these different-- Sorry, calculated fields that have been created. I've got the second gift date, the second gift amount, the length of time between the first and second gift, my last contact activity, my last contact date. I even have the last general ledger and the last solicitation codes that were given towards or where did the gift come from, basically. All these fields, now because I've created them, they will exist on the main page. If I go back to, I'm going to just go to a different record briefly here. If I'm looking, oh, that's not the right one, but it's okay, if I'm looking at Lucy here, what I have is that she's only given one gift, so there is no information in the number of months between the first and second gift. I don't have that information yet, and I don't have a second gift date, but I do have the last contact activity. Today, I did send her a thank you letter, so that does show up here. Any field that exists in DonorPerfect can be added to a DonorPerfect report and can be added to filter the records by. If I go to the "reports", and then the "report center", and I'm going to run my second gift report that I've created. First, let me just show you what the result of this is and I'm going to run it. I'm going to find the list of people right now that have given their second gift, and I have it based on the date range, and I can see how many months that it take between both those gifts. I have here those that donated in the first three months their second gift, then it keeps going up, and then I have 32 here. That's the never give up, I guess everything is possible category right here. Oh, actually, I have a second page. No, I don't have a second page. That was just in average at the end. My average actually could be interesting if it's 4.73. This is in months, so it's calculating the number of months. Let's say I wanted to add to this report, I wanted to see more information. You can create your own easy reports and add any type of fields to it that you would like. I can either directly in the middle of this report click this little pencil so that I can edit the report. Here, I can, on this side, see all the DonorPerfect fields. If I wanted to add the last contact type right here, so let's go with that one, the last contact type. I click the little plus with the description I would like to see the word and that's not actually the name of the field. I don't think it's the last activity that I want, so I added the wrong field obviously. No, that's not what it's called either. I'm going to find it or the last contact activity. See? I knew it. Okay, so one second here, let me just remove the other one. I'm going to save and open. When I'm saving and opening, now I will have that new field added to my report. Now I can see what was my last contact activity with all of these and they were all different. It was not always the same, some I didn't even have a contact with them. I've never even sent them anything, but we can definitely see a trend that there was a lot of telephone calls. I believe that's it for me, Amanda. Speaker: Yes, sorry, I realized I forgot to unmute myself. One of the biggest reasons that donors will not give again is that they feel that nonprofits don't seem interested in them. In fact, research has indicated that 53% of donors leave due to the lack of communication from the nonprofits that they care about. I'm really happy to see that we were doing lots of phone calls there and that our donors seem to have really appreciated that. If we go to the next slide, we can rectify this issue by really diving into our data and understanding why the donor gave in the first place. There's quite a few ways that we can get this information. If you were just in the what's new, what's next DonorPerfect session, then you heard a lot about DonorPerfect insights, which is going to provide you with in-depth information about your donors' motivations, their potential to give, and their preferred methods of communications. You can also look at the data that you already have about your constituents, what you've collected from phone conversations, those details that you're capturing in that gift record or on the main profile. What you can do is you can combine both of those informations together to create donor personas because having those donor profiles will help you cultivate your relationships with those new donors and it's going to help you more wisely use your resources and outreach efforts to help you focus on those prospects that are going to be most likely to respond to your efforts. What I'm going to have Sarah do real quick is just open up a donor profile and show you some of those DP Insights fields. Those are going to cover everything from their preferences in different communications to their capacity to give and their affinity for different sectors of the nonprofit industry, even letting you know what age group your constituency is falling into. All that is super valuable information because it can help you build an engagement strategy that's going to really work for your constituents of now, and the constituency of the future. [silence] If you want to go to the next slide, awesome. If you remember all the way back at the beginning of this presentation before we had all those echoing issues, Kelly mentioned that new donors who give a second gift have a 63% donor retention rate. Retaining first-time donors does involve an investment of time and resources, but the outcome is certainly worth the challenge. Hopefully, what you're walking away with today is understanding the value of engaging donors on a more personal level, and how you can use all of DonorPerfect tools to help streamline your engagement strategy and track its overall success. We hope that after today, all of your donor relationship statuses are going to change from it's complicated to in a relationship. Thank you guys so much for attending this session. I think now we're going to go ahead and open it up to some questions. Speaker: Thank you, Sarah and Amanda and everybody for hanging in there about our technical difficulties. To be honest and transparent, I'm afraid to bring our faces back to the screen because I don't know if that caused the problem or not. I do know, Sarah and Amanda, that a lot of the questions that came in were really around some of the DonorPerfect calculated fields that everybody has, but they're not seeing them on their screens, so could you possibly go into DonorPerfect and just show them how they can perhaps add a section similar to our giving engagement section and display one of those standard fields? Speaker: I would love to do that. I also just shared in the chat a knowledge base article that refers to DonorPerfect calculated fields so that people can have a list of them to know what to look for. Just so you know, the article I shared is just a list like this that gives you the field's name. I would focus on this because this is what really is going to help you find the fields in case they were renamed by someone in the history of your organization in your DonorPerfect. If we go to the gear over here in the top right corner, we're going to go to the screen designer. I've never seen these fields, I don't know where they are. They could be hidden on the main screen, but they could also be hidden on the bio-screen, so oftentimes when I don't know where something is, I like to change it to all screens, and then just use my favorite feature when I'm looking for something, which is control F, and then I'm going to go ahead and write YTD, and then the system is going to find me all fields that have YTD in it. Right here, I'm finding these specific fields in my current system. Now they're all in the giving and engagement profile in my case. It's possible that they're not in a section called summary, it's possible they're on the bio-screen so that way it's easier to find them, and then once I've found them, then I can select them all and then at the top of the screen, I'm going to have the option to set them to display yes. They're already displayed. If I wanted to put them in a specific section and on the main screen, for example, and call it giving an engagement profile just like I did, then you can go to sections here, still in the screen designer, choose the screen that you want, and then create the section first, and then once you found them and selected them, you can move them to that section as well as display them. I would just add a new section here. Speaker: Great. Thanks, Sarah. Speaker: If you don't see it listed as giving an engagement profile, it might be called summary in your system. Speaker: It might be not in a section at all, they may just be randomly in your system, so that's why sometimes just searching by their names is going to be easier. Speaker: Yes. Speaker: Awesome. Another question that came up is actually how can we access this tutorial for future reference? All of the sessions are recorded. I do believe that that was another question. All of these sessions are recorded including the crazy feedback, so you will get to experience that for a second time if you'd like, but what you're going to have to do is wait a short period of time, I think it's around 30 minutes for the recording to get rendered, and then the recordings themselves are going to be available for 30 days. If you want something as a recording, you're going to have to come back to the event platform, and then just come back to the session, and then you'll be able to access the recording. Another question is about the email template. A question came in is is there a way to change the email template of who it's coming from? I'm going to then add a follow-up question is, can that also be changed as it's being used from the gift record? There's two questions there, Sarah or Amanda, I'm not sure who's going to answer it. Speaker: The template comes from mailings and then email templates, and from here, you're going to be able to edit your template. If I was to go change the one I used earlier, this is where it's coming from. If I wanted to from someone else, I could change it here. This will change the template permanently, and that is where the emails will come from going forward. You cannot change it on an individual gift basis. Speaker: Okay, so when you're in the gift record, can it be changed there as well? I'm sorry if you answered that, Sarah, I was scrolling through questions. Speaker: When I'm in the gift, I'm not going to have the ability to change it now. I can only change who it's going to. Speaker: Fantastic. Just making sure that we're clear in one of the questions and answers. Speaker: I know I got another question that came in and just because I'm thinking of it, I saw it early when we were having echo issue, this check box here, first gift, whenever this is the first gift that someone gives, it is checked automatically. There is nothing that you will need to do manually to check that check box, it's just the system does it for you. Just I saw that question early on but go ahead, sorry. Speaker: Oh, no, I was actually going to ask that question. It is populated for the first time, it may not be visible on your gift entry screen, so if it is not actually visible on your entry screen, then again, you would have to go into screen designer and display it much like the calculated fields that Sarah and Amanda were speaking to a moment ago. Speaker: Here, I know it's a gift field, so I could select the gift right away to look for it. Speaker: Absolutely. Now, I'm wondering if you can speak to, what would be some of the reasons that people may not be able to see the screen designer? Can what if you speak to that? My guess is that it's probably having to deal with user management and user permissions, so if you don't see like settings and screen designer, it's possible that you don't have access to that in user management. Sarah, I think you're still controlling the screen, so if you can just show in user management. Speaker: If you click on the gear and the screen designer option does not exist here, it's because you do not have the user permission to use it, and that is a user permission that is given in user management. Let's say that I don't want Amanda to touch my screen. Speaker: Hey, now. Speaker: I do want you to do things to the screen, so don't worry, but here, you have the different features. If I go into settings, I have the screen designer that I could just not give her access to, and then if I saved, she will no longer see it when she looks at her settings. Speaker: All right, I'm just looking at some of the chat and just to clarify, there's a lot of interest in that giving and engagement section. I know it's amazing information. If you are not even seeing that section, it would have to be added first, so you would do that in screen designer as Sarah and Amanda were mentioning, and then once you have a section, then you can start adding the DonorPerfect field. I definitely know that there's a lot of interest in that, so I just wanted to clarify that. While it wasn't an official question, it was something that came through. There's a couple of questions. Amanda, I know you just had a conversation with Evan and about DP Insights, do you want to just briefly speak to, what do or what would be the best course of action for our clients regarding getting more information about DP Insights? Of course, they like the idea of it, but wondering what does it cost? Does it cost? How do they go about getting the information? Where would you direct them? Speaker: Thank you, Kelly, that's a great question. If they want more information on DonorPerfect insights, I would encourage you to reach out to your account manager. They will be able to give you more details and they'll be able to talk to you about the pricing aspects. One thing I will just emphasize is that right now, DP Insight is just for our US clients, so if you are in Canada, unfortunately, it's not an offering that we currently have. Though if you're interested in something similar, then you might want to talk to your account manager about iWave, which is a very similar product that will give you information similar to what Insights gives you. Speaker: Great, thank you. A question and this will be our last one is, people are hearing a lot of great information and you're all at different places and your knowledge of DonorPerfect, and I'm going to risk bringing our faces back onto the screen. Go ahead and pull your webcams up, ladies, but where do you go next? Somebody specifically said, "Hey, we want to," and maybe we're going do this, there we go, "We want to get started, how do we get started? We want to launch a monthly giving program, where do you recommend that we get started?" One place that I know that we would love to hear from is training, so if you reach out to training.services@software.com, we would love to hear from you and just jump in the ring with you and see what we can do to help partner with you and move you along. On behalf of Sarah, Amanda, myself, and everybody behind the scenes that we didn't even know that was helping us solve our problems, thank you, and we look forward to seeing you perhaps in one more session. Have a great afternoon. Speaker: Thank you so much. Speaker: Thank you. Bye. Speaker: Bye. [01:00:20] [END OF AUDIO]

Fundraising Success/Dashboards & Reports Part 2

Learn how to build a big-picture fundraising strategy based on the goldmine of data in your DonorPerfect system.

Fundraising Success/Dashboards & Reports Part 2

Description

Learn how to build a big-picture fundraising strategy based on the goldmine of data in your DonorPerfect system. Plan for the future of your organization using DonorPerfect's filters, reports, dashboards and exports. We'll also cover key performance indicators such as growth in giving, donor retention, average gift and donor lifetime value.

Transcript

Speaker: All right. Good afternoon, everybody. Welcome to our session. You are joining us in the session where we have called it Fundraising Success, where we're going to talk about the DonorPerfect dashboards and reports. You are in a session that is going to be led by myself, I'm Kelly, Sarah, and Amanda. Yes, unfortunately, we are not using our webcams. We encountered a little bit of some technical difficulties in our earlier session, so we are trying to mitigate those issues and just keep it focused on the content instead of our faces. We do miss seeing your faces. Well, I guess we're not seeing your faces, but anyway, we're glad that you're here. Just a couple of details, like all the other sessions, the handouts, and the slide decks will be available to you. If you scroll all the way down to the bottom of the screen, you will see them there. If for some reason they are not there, it seems to be very useful if you refresh and then they'll appear. If you want to grab them right away, great, download. If you want to add them to your briefcase, we recommend that. They will also be available when you go back to view the recording. Every session has been recorded including this one and it will take a little short amount of time, 30 minutes or so for it to be rendered and then you will have access to it, but just keep in mind that while this is the last session today, that you will have access to all of the sessions and the recordings for 30 days. You can come back and you can get the information at any point. I am super excited to have this conversation with you, with Sarah and Amanda. We are going to be doing this as a little bit of a tag-team approach. As I said, our faces are not going to be visible like they have been in all of the other sessions just as a way to try and troubleshoot some of the problems we had in our 1:45 session. Sarah and Amanda, I'm going to turn it over to each of you. Sarah, I believe you are getting us started, so it is all yours. Speaker: I am, and I am so excited to talk about this right now and to do this last session with you guys. As you know, in any organization, metrics will help you measure success and failures and what brought you to either result, and DonorPerfect dashboards and their reports will help you measure and track many of those. I also know, and maybe some of you have noticed that sometimes it can be overwhelming or even nerve-wracking when you are told, "I need this result" or "I want this metric. I want this information," and now you need to go and run a report in DonorPerfect and the options are endless. We're going to do today is we're going to take a walk to three different scenarios on how DonorPerfect reports can provide the data that you need so that you can make informed decisions and fulfill your fundraising strategies and goals. The first scenario that we are going to walk through is how much money did I raise compared to my goal? The second one will be who are my lapsed donors and how to best re-engage them? Then the third one is, do I have any potential major donors amongst my mid-range donors? I'm going to take you through the first one and then pass it on to Amanda. The first one is really about keeping track of where you are in terms of meeting your fundraising goal and different campaigns, or it could be just annually, and the annual fundraising goal dashboard meter will do that. I'm going to show you that specific meter on the dashboard. I'm going to show you two reports, the Gift Comparison by Time Period and the Cross Tabulation report. As I show them to you in DonorPerfect, I'll give you some more information on them. I'm going to take you straight away now to DonorPerfect. Bear with me as I navigate to the system. Hopefully, you've seen a bit of this already in the session earlier today that talk about the different metrics and dashboard items that are new this year, and one of them is the annual fundraising goal. The annual fundraising goal, I'm just going to make it fit my screen, there we go. Right now, we can see it's the first thing I see on my dashboard. It's quick glance, I've raised 87,000. I had a goal of 130,000, that's 67%. My goal is by December 31st, 2021. I still have a bit of time. Potentially, I know I have a lot of fundraising happening at the end of the year. I'm not worried, I feel like I'm way on track to reach this goal. Potentially, your year is not a calendar year. You want to track something completely different. You would like to track a fiscal year. All you have to do is right here where the goal is, you see this little tiny blue pencil, and you can click on it, and that will let you choose whatever that goal is, and then what is the last month of that 12-month period. The meter is really tracking 12 months ending whatever months you put here. If I was to change it and say, my fiscal year ends March 31st, so I'm going to track till March, and my goal could still be 130,000 and then I'm going to save. Then when it reloads, you're going to see, it will change what percentage I'm at because now, all gifts that I've received in January, February, March 2021 were part of the previous year so they're no longer counted but I also have way more time to reach my full goal. That's easy as that, you can change the goal and the date right there. That was the first thing that I wanted to talk to you about it today. The second thing is one of the most critical, I'd say, element of success is often learning from the past. Analyzing your tactics after each campaign to determine what produced results and what didn't so that you can refine your strategies is a great way to do that. Measuring success can be especially useful when you're looking at two successive campaigns on the same subject. We're going to do the gift comparison by time period, that is a report that lets you compare any field in DonorPerfect over time. It could be by year, by month, by quarter, or by week. We're going to go and navigate there now. I'm going to go to the Reports and then Report Center, and I'm just going to zoom in a little bit since I zoomed out so you could see the giving meter. I'm trying to make this more user-friendly. I'm looking for the gifts comparison by time period. You can always search for report in the search bar over here. You can type the word or pick the right spelling, it always helps, gift comparison by time period. This is the report I'm looking for. It is a financial report; I could have looked specifically in the folder. In my case, it's also in my favorite because I use it often. The gift comparison by time period will let you really choose a date range of your choice. Let's say that I have a campaign that I run every year and I've run it for the last three years and I'd like to compare that campaign. If I was to do a date range of the last three years, then I would just go back to 2019. I can leave it till today, and then I'm going to split it over here by a year. I just want to see each year, but like I said, the system lets you do by week, by month, by quarter, or by year. I could do something completely different with this and I wanted to remove the selection filter, so just one second. If I wanted to instead just see, oh, is the campaign going this year month per month, if I'm running something different every month, I can also do that. Then the field to segment by is going to be the campaign field. I'm going to go ahead, here we go, and then I'm going to click Screen. If you've run DonorPerfect reports before, you may notice that this is slightly different than the typical sidebar that we'll see in the next report and in most of our reports, but clicking screen means show it to me on the screen right now. My other options would be to print it, send it to Excel, send it to a Word document. Here I have the campaign that I'm running every year, so Forever Home. I have 2019, 2020, 2021. I can compare it here and see what happened in 2019, what happened in 2020, what happened in 2021. I actually received in 2021, some gifts to the previous campaign, you can see them here and that is because some people chose to enroll in my monthly giving, through that campaign potentially. Or it could be because they finally responded to my coupon and sent me an older coupon. I can either decide that I really want to see the whole year, or I can really focus on the code on the side. The other thing that's really nice is I have my new building campaign over here. That is a campaign that I'm running to build a new kitty café that we're building right now and my fake rescue center. This building campaign is ongoing for multiple years so this is even more useful to track and see, okay, so how did you do in 2019? 2020 was a rough year and now we really have our biggest fundraiser for the building campaign is coming up in October, so that's normal that the number is low still. I could say that, okay, I feel like I'm on track or not, depending on the situation. That's for the gift’s comparison by time period, right now comparing campaign by year. The next report that I'm going to show you is the cross-tabulation report. Sometimes, when you look, you want to look at more than just one segment, for example, understanding which solicitation efforts directed gifts to what fund? We're going to go to cross-tabulation report, so still in report center, where all reports come from, and it's right here in my favorites. I could have again, searched for it in here, I could go look to financial reports because it is a financial report. The cross-tabulation report, my colleague, Kelly, that you've heard already today, always makes fun of me almost because I love this report so much. I think it's the best report in DonorPerfect because you can literally choose so many options to view it. I'm only going to show you one today but just remember this report as any two fields that you want to compare what has come in for those two segments, you can. Right now, I'm going to show you solicitation by general ledger, which was selected here and the cross-tabulation is really going to create a table so I'm going to see on the left side, my solicitation codes, and then on the top, my general ledger, and then we're going to see them meet in the middle. I'm going to run it, just to make sure there's nothing saved below and here we go. I'm going to just say, "Okay." Here, what we get is all my different general ledgers are listed here and then on the side my solicitation code, so just like I told you. Then I can see that my annual appeal 2021 well, 48 of those gifts, they all went to the building fund. Now I know this is an appeal, maybe that I do strictly for the building fund so that would make sense. If I look at Giving Tuesday, or grants, or any of these, I can see different categories that were selected. The one that interests me right now is where people choosing to donate from my website donation form. Here I've got that 24 chose the adoption fund, whereas 56 just put it to the general fund, so didn't necessarily pick something and six of them actually chose health. I still had two, sorry, for the building fund. What we see as the beginning is those that didn't pick anything, so there was no actual general ledger selected in that column and there was no solicitation code selected in that line, so that's what that means. Anything in blue, underlined, is clickable. I want to see who are those 24 people that donated to the adoption fund and here it is, that is their list and all of their donations. Again, I could export this to excel if I needed to. I'm going to pass this over to Amanda, and I hope that this was helpful and giving you three potentially go-to reports or options, and Amanda is going to talk about the lapsed donors. Speaker: All right. Thank you, Sarah, so much and I am so excited to get to talk to you guys about re-engaging those lapsed donors. Lapsed donors are those supporters who gave to your organization in the past, but they no longer do. The amount of time since their last donation or the criteria that you use to define a lapse status, that's going to differ by your organization. Today, we're going to stick with DonorPerfect's definition, which is they gave a gift last year, but they haven't given a gift this year. Why re-engage lapsed donors? Well, reconnecting with lapsed donors is a much more cost-effective and less time-consuming way to bring in funding, rather than going after brand new donors. Plus, it ensures that you have more long-time supporters as part of your organization that can help further your message. In terms of what I'm going to cover around lapsed donors, I'm first going to show you guys some dashboard metrics to help you identify, do you have a donor retention issue? Then we're going to take a look at the lapsed donor report to see who they are, and the general ledger analysis report to identify what are their interests. Sarah, you can go ahead and open up DonorPerfect for us real quick. On this organization's dashboard, we have quite a few different tiles and metrics that can help you identify do you need to focus on donor retention? The very first one is that donor retention tile, and it's going to tell you what your donor retention rate is. In this case, we're at 62% but if I'm looking at that red metric, it's telling me that my donor retention has actually decreased by 19%, compared to where I was last year. That's a very broad number. If I want to get a little bit more detail and look at my donor retention month over month, then I can look at the donor retention line graph and that's going to actually show us my donor retention from last year compared to the current year, and I can maybe start identifying the month where my donor retention is starting to decrease. Then I can also take a look at my donor retention by status bar graph because what that's going to do is show me the number of lapsed donors that I have for my current year compared to the number of lapsed donors that I had in the previous year. I can see I had significantly less lapsed donors last year than I did in the previous year, so yes, I need to perhaps come up with a strategy on how I'm going to re-engage them. In order to re-engage them, we have to know who are my lapsed donors. Sarah, I'm going to have you go to the reports and report center and we're going to take a look at the last year but not this year report, also shorted to call LYBUNT. Sarah is going to go ahead and click that report and this is one of those reports where you don't necessarily have to apply a filter because this report is actually going to look at your lapsed donors based on the fiscal year that you have in your DonorPerfect system. As always, it's a good idea to hit clear values to make sure there are no filters, and then go ahead and run that report. What this report will very simply do is it's going to list out all of your constituents that are marked as lapsed, and you'll be able to see some of the key details about their giving history; who they are. When was the date of their last contribution? What was the value of their last gift? How much did they give total in the previous fiscal year? How much have they given over their lifetime? This is super helpful because we can't necessarily go after every single lapsed donor. This can be some helpful information for you to make your lapsed donor list a little bit smaller and targeted on those donors that you feel you want to invest those resources and time in re-engaging. If you did want to pull this list out of DonorPerfect, you can hover over the downward caret next to run report, and you can export it to Excel, Word as a PDF, or you can use an export template to get the data out that way. Knowing who our lapsed donors are, that's only half of the lapsed donor equation because our goal is to re-engage them, we want to bring them back as a donor, so we have to think about what's the best way to engage them. The best way is always segmentation, segmentation, segmentation. Let's look at what the donor gave to us in the past so that when we're communicating with them to ask them to rejoin us, we can send them a message that is meaningful to them. One of the ways that we can do this is we can look at the last general ledger code that this donor gave to. Sarah is going to go ahead and go to the reports and report center and she's going to pull up a report called the General Ledger Analysis Report. She's going to use the search bar to search for that or she can scroll down and find it. Both of those are going to work. There's always more than one way to do something in DonorPerfect. Now unlike the lapsed donor report, the general ledger analysis report is not going to know that I only want to look at these details for my lapsed donors. I have to set a selection filter so that when I'm looking at this information, it's only showing me those general ledger codes for those lapsed donor segments. Sarah's going to go into the sidebar and click the apply icon, and what I'm going to do is I'm going to use a filter that I've already saved and it's going to be in my, I believe they're called the giving and engagement filter folders. No, it's called standard fundraising filters. If Sarah clicks on that folder, and this is a group of filters that you all have access to, if you don't see it under standard fundraising filters, you might see them under your default filter folder. What I'm looking for is my filter for lapsed donors and I can build this filter based on lapsed donors on a calendar year or fiscal year, depending on what it is you want to look at. In my case, Sarah, go ahead and select calendar. I always like running my reports on calendar, that's just my personal preference. Now if I click run report, I'm going to be able to now see all of the general ledger codes that my lapsed donors have given to. If I click on that total given hyperlink for one of these segments, let's look at adoption because that's something that's very near and dear to my heart. I can see who gave to that adoption general ledger so that when I'm coming up with how I want to engage with these lapsed donors, maybe that messaging is going to be around how my organization has helped many different dogs and cats find their forever home. That messaging could be through a direct mail piece, it could be through an email. You could even send a video message at is a way to reengage these constituents. The goal is that we want to segment that communication and we want to make sure that when we're talking to them, we're thanking them for their past donations and emphasizing the impact that they had, and asking them would they like to continue to have that larger impact? I could go on and on and on about lapsed donors, it's something that I'm very passionate about, but unless I do now have to turn it over to Kelly because she has some great information about how you can find potential major donors among your mid-range donors. Speaker: All right. I am super excited to follow Sarah and Amanda's conversation. I'm going to attempt to answer the question, do I have any potential major donors amongst my mid-range donors? Before I explain how I'm going to do it, let's just pause for a moment and think about major donors. Some of you may have participated in sessions already and our conference has spoken about this, but I'm really just going to focus in on information that exists already in DonorPerfect. Having major donors, I think we would all agree is a key element or a key fundamental building block of a successful nonprofit. In fact, many fundraisers, if I were to poll each of you, are going to say that oftentimes around 88% of all nonprofit funds come from just 12% of your donors and those are typically your major donors. Here's the question, what if you don't know who your major donors are or you would like to increase the count of major donors you currently have? We realize not all donors give a major gift as their first gift, their second, or even their third gift. Sometimes they're hidden, they're buried in there. In fact, many of them go unnoticed and really just remain that mid-range donor. They're important, but we know from a lot of the things that we've learned in this conference and you may have experienced firsthand is that you need to have some of these major donors. We know that cultivating donor relationships is super important at all levels, but we also know that building relationships doesn't just happen by itself. It takes time to build these solid relationships so that when you are having these conversations with these potential major donors, they're actually going to be really excited to support and partner with you. I know like Amanda said, we could talk about this one topic for a long time; I need to keep moving. I'm going to break this down into a very short conversation, but I'm going to share with you two dashboard reports, two filters, and two reports that you can use to find some potential major donors. Let's go ahead and go into DonorPerfect and take a closer look. Where I'm actually going to start is at the organization dashboard. As you know we've been talking about this organization dashboard and I'm actually going to focus on two tiles, two widgets that are really about overall metrics, that you are going to find hopefully useful in tracking your efforts and cultivating mid-range donors to become major donors, but you really need to think of about this as a benchmark process. Here's where I'm at now, I'm going to implement a fundraising initiative or strategy, and I'm going to come back and I'm going to periodically check to see how am I doing. The two that I want to draw your attention to are, Growth in Giving and the Donor Lifetime Value. They're book-ending, the tiles there in the middle. Growth in Giving is one metric to help you make informed growth-oriented decisions. Specifically, Growth in Giving is a percentage of growth or decline in revenue from two years ago in the past to 12 months ago on a rolling basis. It's a year-over-year basis. You will also see the total dollar amount difference between these two time periods. There are many ways to see a gain in Growth in Giving such as gifts from new donors, gifts from recaptured donors that Amanda just spoke about, and increased gift amounts from upgraded donors and that's what I'm going to focus on. Another valuable metric to help us spur us on in this quest of finding potential major donors is using the Donor Lifetime Value. Now, this is a really valuable number, but let's break it down in case it's new to you. Donor Lifetime Value is a prediction on how much money you can expect to receive from a donor, starting from their first donation and lasting until the moment they stop. Yes, it is based on actual data like their average gift amount or frequency of gifts, but since we don't ever really know when a donor will stop giving, it does become a bit of a prediction. However, while it's a predictive number, it does help to paint a picture of how we're doing in donor engagement, donor loyalty, and donor giving. If we apply the idea of major donors and the positive impact they can have on both of these metrics, it's going to be the motivation we need to keep on going. Let's go deeper in our knowledge quest here. I'm going to use all the data that exists in every system and it's going to be the data that I'm going to use to define and find my mid-range donors. My mid-range donors in this conversation is going to be an individual who has given a count of gifts between 2 and 10 gifts, and their largest or what was sometimes referred to as their maximum amount that they've ever given is between $100 and $250. That's going to be my target. I'm going to take that information, and that's going to become my selection filter. All right. Here comes the dreaded words of selection filters, and it can be mind-boggling and frustrating. We're going to try and I'm going to give you a little tip that we all use as trainers to help figure out where the data is at. We're actually going to go into our record. Let's look up my donor, Henry Arnold. As Henry's record is loading, keep in mind my definition of a mid-range donor. What I'm going to do, is I'm going to show you where in the record these nuggets of information are at, because once I know where the information is at in a record, I can then go apply it and build my selection filter. First off, I wanted to narrow this down or another way as Amanda was alluding to, segmenting to just individual donors. Typically, at the top of the main page is going to be a field that might be labeled donor type, it might be labeled constituent type, and that's where I'm identifying the type of constituent I'm focusing on individuals. I know Henry's an individual. The second part of who I wanted is that they have to have given a count of gifts between 2 and 10. You can see that Sarah is driving all this because she's highlighting the number of gifts. Perhaps, if you scroll up to the top, you'll notice in the donor profile, you'll also see it there as a number. You can see it in a couple of different places. Again, Henry meets my criteria. Now my third criteria is that they have to have given in their largest gift, is somewhere between $100 and $250. Again, it's a field that's visible in the donor profile, and it is a field that I can also choose to display in an entry screen. If you are new to DonorPerfect, or maybe you're looking at your screens and you don't see some of these fields in a given engagement profile section like it is displayed on this screen right now, you can add those through what's called the screen designer. We're not going to get into that now, but just know that it can be done. These are all DonorPerfect standard fields. Now that we know our definition of our mid-range donors that we want to search for finding, and we know where the information is at in a record, now what we want to do is apply it to a report. Let's go ahead and hop into the report center. We're going to take a look at what I consider a powerhouse report. It is the good old comprehensive donor revenue analysis. Now, I could absolutely use this report and look at everything in my system. I don't want to look at it for everything in my system, I'm focusing in on a segment that I've just defined. What we have to do is we have to apply what's referred to on the screen as setting a selection filter. Setting a selection filter is a way of telling DonorPerfect exactly which record you want to report on. We're going to check the box to set a selection filter. Now what we need to do is we're going to add a new filter. When Sarah was talking, she used the sidebar fields and criteria available. When Amanda was talking about lapsed donors, she was using some of the safe selection filters. I'm now going to walk you through how to build a selection filter. We did our pre-work and found where all of that information was that made my criteria. I know that all three pieces were found on the main page. In box or step one, I'm going to choose main bio, because that's where those three pieces of information existed. The first thing that I'm looking for is my constituent types, sometimes referred to as donor type or individuals. I'm going to choose constituent types. Since I'm just searching for one value, I'm going to choose exactly equal to, and since this is a coded field, I'm going click on that gray button, look up codes, and then select individual. Now I'm going to add more criteria because remember, I have two more parts of my puzzle. Now I'm going to go back to box 1 and it's still correct, main bio. Going to box 2, this time I'm going to search for the field that's going to give me the count of gifts which is referred to as the number of gifts. Now I have a bit of a range. I'm going to choose between in box 3 and I'm going to enter in 2 to 10, and that's the count of gifts. I have one more criteria to add. I'm going to add more criteria, and I'm going to repeat the process. Again, main bio is already selected, I could be choosing it just as an FYI from other pages. In this example, I'm main bio, so I'm good. Now I don't see maximum gift amount. Don't fret, at the top, I'm going to select all fields. Now I have this long list of fields. I'm just going to scroll through, and I'm going to search for maximum amount. Yes, there it is. We're again going to apply Between because I'm looking for the range of $100 to $250. This is the largest gift they've ever given, not their cumulative, but their largest gift they've ever given. There are the three criteria of my mid-range donors that I'm trying to learn more about, to see if they can become a potential major donor. Now I have the opportunity of reviewing what I've just selected. I want all three things. I'm going to combine the criteria with AND. I could save this filter for use in the future. That's where I can choose Save filter as. Then I can choose done. We're going to go ahead and click on Done. Now what I want to do is I want to review what I just selected. I'm going to click on this screen and let it process. Now again, keep in mind, I'm looking at this report for just a very specific segment. This report, in and of itself, is taking all of the people I've selected and breaking it down into different categories on the left, active donors, retained donors, reactivated donors, and so forth. You'll notice that I have a lot of amazing metrics. Now, in each of these sections, there's a blue link. Let's go ahead and go to the active donors and click on the number 40. I think that's a 48, might be a 45. Speaker: It's 43. Speaker: Thank you, 43. All right. What I see is a bit more information about the people that are my mid-range criteria and they're active, meaning that they've given gifts in this current time period. What do you know? There's Henry Arnold. Now what I'm seeing about Henry Arnold, that in this current year, so from 10-7-2020 to today, I can see that he's given one gift. That gift is $190 and in this time period, it's one. I can see the total lifetime giving, the average amount, the last gift amount. I'm seeing some great information. I've taken a report that could have been run for everybody, I narrowed it down to just this mid-range. Now I can start educating myself a little bit more. Now let's go into Henry's record. There's a couple of ways we could do that. The easiest, I think is just clicking on his name in the report. Now when I go back into his record, I'm going to draw your attention to a couple of other pieces of information. What I'm noticing in my quest for this mid-range to potential major donors, is I'm able to see at a glance, everybody that meets the criteria, and I can easily get into their record. What I'm noticing, in this case, is that he has a lifetime so far of $630, but I'm also noticing that he's a volunteer. Volunteers are a way that you can help measure. Consider this as another kind of feather in his cap as a potential major donor. I'm also seeing that he has given not just three gifts, but he's been around for four years. Now if I scroll down, and I have a section, like in this system we have this giving an engagement profile, I can start looking at some other information like, what did he give to most recently, his last solicitation, I can look at what was his last contact interaction. If I were to apply and get some of the DP insights data in here. Again, this is predictive analytics. I can see some of the things that he has interest in, I can see the wealth rating. Yes, this is another part of the DP insights, is it's going to give you a bit of a glimpse about their potential giving. What I'm seeing is that not only is Henry is in this mid-range, there's a lot of potential here. Now that we're starting to dig in and review some of the information that I have, whether I'm using DP insights or not, I'm getting to know Henry a bit more. Now what I want to do is I want to step back and I want to run a different report so this is my second report, where I want to look at these midrange donors, but I'm going to add one more detail in terms of their wealth rating. We're going to go to the constituent summary. The comprehensive donor revenue analysis was not as upfront about who my donors were, now I'm going to run a different report. Again, this is the constituent summary. Now one of the things that I can draw your attention to is in the sidebar, you are going to see that the filter that we just ran is still there, we didn't name it, but it's still there. That's kind of a time-saver so I'm going to click on the pencil because what I want to do is I want to narrow it down just a little bit more, I want to make my segment just a bit more specific so you can see that all three criteria are still there but there's a blue link there where I can add one more level. Let's add more criteria and I'm going to add to it just so that you can see, you can choose any field and this could be your own ranking field, it doesn't have to be a DP insights field, but I am going to use that, that DP insights and typically ranking type fields that you would build for yourself are going to be on the main page. I'm going to choose main bio and then I am going to choose the DP insights field for wealth rating. I'm going to say that it's between 75 and 100. Then I'm going to add that and then continue. That brings me back to where it was that I was at a moment ago. Again, I could choose to save this, since I'm really just in an investigative stage, I may not want to so I'm going to go ahead and click on Done. Let's take a look at who we have. Now I can see a bit more of a narrowed-down list of who I might want to start with and Henry Arnold is in there. Again, I validated what I selected, it's here in the report. Now I'm able to see their name, their phone number, excuse me their address, their phone number if they had it, and I am able to massage this a bit more, I might be able to send or schedule this to send it to somebody else, but there's a lot that you can do once you have a targeted segment. Talking about our potential major donors is you have to get in there and you have to dig around a little bit. Then start applying some selection filters to reports like the comprehensive donor revenue analysis, like the constituents summary, but then if you keep going back to those dashboard growth and giving and donor lifetime value, I suspect that you're going to start seeing a bit of an increase as you slowly deepen the relationships with these people because they're already donors. Now you're just strengthening and deepening those relationships. As we come closer to the end of our time, we're just going to do a quick recap, and then we're going to open it up for questions. Go on back to the slide. Here it comes. All right, so this is a very common quote that some of you may be familiar with and maybe it's been slightly revised, but you can't really know where you're going until you know where you've been. As a summary, as Sarah said, you can use the data you already have to see the performance. You want to look back to see how you've done so that you can make informed decisions for the future. You can review your data as Amanda was indicating, to reengage those donors, to strengthen the relationship with your donors that have already given. You just need to reach out and re-establish that relationship. Then when you're searching for potential major donors, you can invest in your data to get to know your donors more deeply and implement a more personalized strategy. Thank you so much. We are now going to open it up to questions and I'm just going to pull this back. I know when I was not talking, I did mark a couple of questions. Let me-- Speaker: Let me go ahead, Kelly, and help you out with a very good question that just came in, and it's about the last report, you were doing, the constituent summary. If the whole database hasn't been rated for predictive analytics, the person asked, this may not be the best report, right? I think the report is still great. Your filter may just be different. Maybe you want to speak a bit more to that. Speaker: Yes, so I think the thing to keep in mind is I could go in, and for example, I've helped a customer build their own custom fields, they went into screen designer, and they built their own ranking field, had nothing to do with DPN sites, nothing whatsoever, nothing to do with donor search, nothing, it's their own fields, and they exported records, they populated it with their ranking, and they imported it back in. If I had been using that system, I could have applied a different selection filter that said, my custom ranking field equals b, because that means they're mid-range. I could use that same report but my filter would be different. That they are individuals, they give an account of gift between 2 and 10, a maximum gift amount of 102,50 and my custom field equals b. I just used one example of a new source of information that's available to you but if you don't use that, and you don't have that, it's okay, you can use any field and you can just change your filter. Speaker: Thank you. Another question that I would like to ask Amanda, is when you're using the last year, but not this year report, and maybe I can go to it so that you can answer the question properly. Someone was asking, could you add solicitation codes to it or could you add addresses so that you could reach out to them? Speaker: That's a great question. Yes, so Sarah, I'll let you get into that report before I give the answer. The answer is right now with the standard reports, when we click Run Report, we don't at this moment, have the opportunity to add additional columns of data to this report as we see it in DonorPerfect. The great news is if we want to see those extra pieces of data, there's a couple of solutions that are available to you depending on what your DonorPerfect package contains. The one that I know every person will have the capability to do is you can use an export template. If you go to the downward arrow and select Export Template. I like to think of these as being almost like custom Excel files that you build in DonorPerfect, whereby if Sarah clicks on that plus sign, I can go through and under selected fields, I can add any fields that I want to see in the Excel file that I'm exporting. I can go ahead and find that last gift date, last gift General Ledger code, last solicitation, and I can add them to my template and also make sure that I have those address fields. When I'm happy with this, I can click Save and Close, and of course, give it a name. Thank you, Sarah. I can just click Export, and that's going to take these lists of lapsed donors and put them in an Excel sheet, and pull out those extra pieces of key information that I want to see. That would be solution number one. If your DonorPerfect system also has easy reports as part of your package, then you could actually build a custom lapsed donor report where when you run this report, it'll show you all of that information in the report in DonorPerfect. Really two different ways that you can do it but both of them are going to let you get that key pieces of information out that you need. Speaker: All right, so Sarah, somebody was asking about the annual fundraising goal meter. Is it possible that that can be altered? Question one, so if you could show how they can change the date, and then a follow-up is can they set a selection filter? Speaker: The first question, can you change the date and the amount? Yes, you click the little pencil, and here you would put in whatever your goal is and the day will be the last day that it ends. It will always look at the previous 12 months, so it's a 12 month period. As soon as you do the change, anyone accessing the organizational dashboard will see the updated data, the updated information, so the updated meter. At this moment we cannot add a filter to it, but that is coming, right? Speaker: Yes, and there is also, I don't know if any of you participated in the what's new, what's next. There is also going to be some fundraising goals, meters added where it can be for a very specific--You get to choose based on solicitations and campaigns exactly what the goal is going to represent. Sarah, another question, and I can't find it. That was about the general ledger analysis. Was that you that demonstrated that one? I can't remember who spoke about that one. Speaker: That would have been me. Speaker: Okay, there is the GL analysis Amanda. Is the GL analysis data based on last gift? Speaker: That is a great question. When we look at this particular report, if a donor was lapsed, and they did in fact did give to you more than one potential general ledger, then yes. They would have been included in more than one segment. That would be something that is very important, that you would want to be mindful of. For those of you that think, I want to look at that last general ledger code, how can I do that? You can certainly build a calculated field that would allow you to see that last general ledger code that a person gave to. That could be incorporated into a report if you would like to. I think Sarah is going to pull up a donor record so you can see what that calculated field would look like. In that case, it would be a single entry for each donor, based on this field. That could be incorporated into an easy report. That could also be incorporated into other DonorPerfect reports. I'm having a brain fart at the moment, and I'm trying to think of a report that's [unintelligible 00:52:36] that we could use that for. Sarah, Kelly, if you want to help me out as I'm trying to process in my head? [laughs] That's how you know we're at the end of the conference. Speaker: [laughs] There are reports you can run on any fields. You could always run reports that include the front fields on it, but because now when we're looking at the last general ledger code, we're not necessarily looking at a gift report anymore. Now we're looking at a list with a main, so you're not going to have a canned report that will include necessarily that field. You're going to have to create something. Speaker: I think one of the things that everybody-- I hope everybody has stumbled upon. Maybe you are well informed. Is that any custom field that you create, and that can be done by anybody, as long as you have the user permissions. If you have the easy report builder, you could create your own report, but even if you don't, you could create an export template, and you can look at any information in any field that is in your system. In the sense, it is a type of report. It's excel, so it's not officially a report, but you can still get that information and review it. Sarah, I'm trying to-- who's controlling the mouse? A couple of questions in this session are coming up. They love that giving and engagement section and they are wondering how do they get that on their screens? Some of them are not seeing it. Would you mind just again, going into the screen designer? I know you and I have done a couple of sessions together and we have talked about this because it's an awesome section, but not everybody's been in our sessions. They've been in other fabulous ones. Where you can go to add new fields is in the screen designer. Sarah, do you want to talk through how to do this? Speaker: Yes, the giving and engagement profile section in this system right now is in the main page, and it's called giving and engagement profile. It is a section that exists. I'm just going to click here, preview screen so you can refresh back to what we were talking about. I would say the big majority of these fields are calculated fields that come with your DonorPerefct system. Now it is possible that they are hidden. That they are not currently displayed, it's also possible that they are on the bio page, instead of the main page. What I would suggest is that you try to find them. If I go back to the field listing, you could search for them just by scrolling down and trying to find those field names. I'm going to get you in a moment a knowledge-based article that you can take with you after this that will give you the list of all of those system fields that come with DonorPerfect. If you're scrolling down you can see them, but you can also say, I can't find it, and there is a lot of fields in here. I don't know what I'm looking for. There's a lot there. If you were to just set all screens so that you would find it anywhere, and you were to do, for example, control F. I was trying to find the number of gifts. I'm going to write number, and then it's going to find me way more things than I want, but if I keep going down it's going to eventually get me to what I'm looking for. Maybe not, maybe the number was not a good idea to write. There we go, I just had to write of [chuckles]. Number of gifts, so there it is. That's where the field is. You'll see is it in a section? What screen is it on? Most likely the other ones will be near it. Whatever one you pick to look first, you have a good chance of finding the others. If not, then you could also just go through the list and search them one by one. Once you find it, you can select it over here, and then you could select them all of the ones that you want. Then at the top, you're going to get option here, where you can just set the fields to display. Yes. It was all ready, now it displayed twice. Let me just display it once though. It's being silly. You can also, once you find them and you know where they are, choose to create a section. Where we're in the screen designer, and we are going to give it a second to my DonorPerfect to catch up. Maybe, okay. We can go here to sections. We can create a brand new section and call it Giving and Engagement profile. Maybe you want to give it a different name that fits what we are doing. Then move the fields into that section. Most likely, most of these fields exist already, and I am going to just share with you the list right now if you bear with me. I just will do that right now. This is the list here of the DonorPerfect's calculated fields that are in that section by default. If you do not have the section, then you can create the section. You don't need the section. The fields may exist in the section named something else, the fields may exist in a section that-- Not a section, just listed all over, randomly everywhere. If I'm going to add a new section. Then here I would go ahead and give my section a name, and I'm going to call it number two. Then I save, and now I have a section that exists now currently at the bottom here. I can move it up, I want it to be the first thing I see, and then when I go back to fields I can go and start moving fields into this section. You can drag and drop them manually, or you can select them and then use this feature here, move selected fields to. Then move them. Last thing, just before I end and before we let you go. Screen designer was in the little gear. Screen designer. Speaker: All right. One question that was asked and I know she's been waiting for an answer is, is there a way on the dashboard to apply filters to those widgets? If you wanted to exclude [unintelligible 00:59:33] or what have you, or different types of gifts. From the actual dashboard widgets no, there's no way to do that, but in a report. If you are in the report searcher, then yes you could. The only other way to get very specific tiles to include specific gifts or exclude certain gifts is if you were to add on the report module called smart analytics. There is a way butI don't know that we want to go down that path. The short answer is right now the dashboard widgets are all-inclusive. You can't exclude or include only certain types of gifts. We would love to keep answering your questions. You're asking some great questions but we are out of time [laughs]. Just as a couple of parting words is to let you know that all of the sessions, including this one have been recorded. They are available to you for the next 30 days. You'll just come back into the event platform, find the session where you would like to watch and you can do that. Hopefully, you've been downloading things into your briefcase but it has been a pleasure interacting with you virtually as it is, but we hope that this has been helpful. We look forward to you in training sessions, webinars, perhaps in individual conversations, and maybe even next year's conference. Thanks so much. Have a great evening and take care. [pause 01:01:13] [01:01:50] [END OF AUDIO]

Tools to Engage Your Donors

Donors respond to different communication methods and opportunities to serve. Learn how DonorPerfect tools can help your organization more fully engage your donors.

Tools to Engage Your Donors

Description

Donors respond to different communication methods and opportunities to serve. Learn how DonorPerfect tools can help your organization more fully engage your donors.

Part 1 - Volunteer Management
A volunteer management system helps keep jobs and schedules organized and volunteers happy and informed. We will learn how one DonorPerfect client used VolunteerLocal to run more efficiently.

Part 2 - Text Your Donors
Communication is multi-faceted and we each have our preference. Texting has been the fastest growing method of communication with donors over the last 5 years. Learn how one organization incorporated texting to increase fundraising at an event.

Transcript

Darryl Moser: Hello, everyone. We are about to get started here. Just letting a few other people file in super happy to have you, join our session today. Just give it a few seconds here and then we'll get started. All right. Looks like things are pretty well synced up. My name is Darryl Moser. I'm the business development manager here at DonorPerfect, and I've got 30 years of experience in leading software companies and I've worked with nonprofits through every step of that career, but in my role here at DonorPerfect, for the last five years, I actually look for software tools that allow our clients to extend the functionality of their system through an integrated solution. I also serve on the board of my local food pantry/social service agency and I get the opportunity to look through the eyes of a nonprofit organization when I choose some of those products, and I look for some of the efficiency and ease of use. Today, what we going to be talking about are the tools that will help you to better engage your donors, but not just your donors. Our first session is actually going to be talking about volunteers, and then we're going to follow with a review of engagement tools, including our texting product and a few other brand-new solutions that we're really excited to tell you about, that extend the abilities of what you're able to do, and actually make the relationship stronger with your donors and your constituents. Many nonprofits actually rely on volunteer hours as strongly as they do donor dollars. Both resources are needed to deliver on your mission, but my question is do donors and volunteers expect everyone in your organization to know their contribution, whether it's time, or money? In my nonprofit, that answer is yes. Like theme of our conference, it is in the spirit of relational connection to your donors, volunteers, and all of the constituents that are a part of your organization. Today with me is Paige Pennigar from VolunteerLocal. Page has been with a VolunteerLocal for three years. Prior to that, she spent nine years teaching high school and working with national-based nonprofits, focused on educational equity before moving into a full-time role as the director of business development. Excited to be a part of VolunteerLocal's shift to focus more on nonprofit needs over the last few years, I would now like to turn it over to Paige to explain to you how VolunteerLocal actually helps nonprofits tie together their volunteers together with their donors, and make their volunteer experience more efficient, so Paige with that, I'll let you take it away. Paige Pennigar: Awesome. Thank you, Darryl. Super excited to be part of this conference, thanks to all of you for joining. As Darryl said, my name is Paige. I've been with VolunteerLocal for just over three years. Was in the part-time capacity while I was still classroom teaching, so shout out to any of you that are in the educational nonprofit world and have really been part of our shift over the last few years in terms of having time, especially with the pandemic, to really focus on the needs of nonprofits. We've been working with DonorPerfect for a while now. That integration has really started to evolve over the last year and a half so we're really excited to see a lot more of our DonorPerfect and VolunteerLocal customers take advantage of syncing hours. As Darryl said, using both donors and volunteer hours to leverage what you're trying to do with your mission. I'm going to just give a really quick overview of VolunteerLocal and then focus more on the integration pieces. Just at a glance, VolunteerLocal, we are pretty straightforward in what we do. We give you the tools to create your volunteer calendars, add those last-minute opportunities, those ongoing opportunities, and have your volunteers choose their shifts, sign up for whatever your events might be, again, be those ongoing or one-off events. We offer communication tools, both text message and email. Reporting tools, checking your volunteers in and out for those shifts to track those hours, and then, as we're all here for, to really look at how that integrates with DonorPerfect. If you've got volunteers who are also donors, we are able to essential send all of that information into DonorPerfect so that you can see everyone's profiles, both ends, the donor side and the volunteer side. Just to show you briefly our website itself, the admin view, I'm happy to show any of you, if you're interested in learning more about our us, just the actual overview of what our platform is capable of, but you're just building signup pages where volunteers are able to choose their shifts, give you that information that you want to collect from them, manage waivers, all of that. Then once those volunteers have checked in for those shifts, you're then able to track that information in DonorPerfect with the click of a button. What I'm going to do is just walk you through the ins and outs of that integration, what kind of information you're able to send over to DonorPerfect from VolunteerLocal. We provide support on this front as well, so we'll make sure that you are getting all of the different fields that you would like to send over to DonorPerfect there. Obviously, volunteer hours are going to be a huge part of that, but you might want also to get mobile number, addresses, any other demographic information, you can control what kind of information is getting sent to DonorPerfect. In your VolunteerLocal profile, we will help you manage this section of your profile. We'll get your API key, set up all of that, and then this entire section of your profile will be dedicated to managing that integration, so it's not going to be a scenario where you have to export data and then import it into VolunteerLocal. We'll get everything set up with you so that you only have to click a button when you're in your VolunteerLocal account, and are ready to send that information over to DonorPerfect. Here's an example of one of those pages with the shifts and hours. You're able to push your volunteers upcoming hours into DonorPerfect, and then once a volunteer has checked in or out for that shift, you can sync that information into DonorPerfect, so these are just some examples of those checkboxes. Again, if you have some unique data points that you would like sent into DonorPerfect, we are happy to help get that worked out. You are also able to control how VolunteerLocal will find the matching records in DonorPerfect, so it won't necessarily create a new contact in DonorPerfect, you won't find yourself in a big mess of data. We typically use the email address as that unique identifier. We're very capable of making sure maybe you've got families who are owners, or multiple partners that use the same email address. We have the tools to make sure that that data still transfers over to DonorPerfect without duplicating things or creating new users. I'm going to sit on these pages just for a minute, so in case anybody wants to actually look into these screenshots a little bit more, Darryl, assuming these resources also will be available afterward if people need them, is that right? Darryl: They will. They certainly can and actually Paige, we did have one question that had popped in here whether or not VolunteerLocal includes a mobile app and/or a URL to be able to sign up and recording the hours? Paige: We do have a mobile app for volunteers. We're also in the process of rolling out QR code check-in for your events. Given the scope of the new reality we all are part of, contactless check-in might be something that you're interested in, so we can help you get a QR code check, or set up to check in and out volunteers. In terms of the URL, you'll have a public landing page. We can wrap that landing page and any of your VolunteerLocal pages to look identical to your website so they'll look and feel just like your website, so it's not, your volunteers won't be seeing VolunteerLocal branding, they'll be seeing your branding, so hopefully that answers that URL question. Each individual scheduling page has its own unique URL and then you also have a public landing page. If you wanted to see a bunch of your volunteer opportunities listed on one page, let's say, I go to your website and I click I Want to Volunteer, it'll reroute to their signup page, which will be wrapped again with your website, so it won't really feel like the volunteer's leaving your websit. Then if you're recruiting for a specific event, you can use that individual signup page URL to post on social media out or email out to your current base. We do have the ability to import volunteer data, so if you've already got a pretty robust database of your volunteers, we can help you get that into VolunteerLocal, and you can send out opportunities right away. Darryl: Great and actually, I see that there was a follow-up question on this, and I'm not sure if you had a screen that might actually show what a volunteer might see. I think your example about the events is a really good one. For example, if my nonprofit was about to hold a 5k or something like that, and I wanted to communicate the volunteer opportunities to all of the people that I know that have volunteered in the past that are maybe in my DonorPerfect database, would I email them out of the VolunteerLocal system or is it best to bring that link back into DonorPerfect or can I do it either way? Paige: Yes, so you should be able to do it either way. Obviously, I can't speak as much on the DonorPerfect side in terms of communication, but they're all very welcome to jump in on that, but you can easily import all of your donors, or all of your current volunteers. We do offer a volunteer application. Some nonprofits will call that an interest form or registration form. Essentially, that will be your database of volunteers. You can email them when there's a new volunteer opportunity or Darryl, I'm assuming you probably can speak more to communication tools in Donor Perfect. If you wanted to send an email to all of your donors, you'll still be able to use that unique URL for a specific volunteer, or event, or ongoing volunteer calendar. That link can be sent in any communication tool, I would imagine. Darryl: Got you. Then once they actually do register to be a volunteer, are they given a username and a password or what are the credentials? Paige: Great question. One of the most popular things about our platform from the volunteer side is that there are no usernames and passwords. Everything is going to be tied to the email address and first name combination. I can actually pop over to VolunteerLocal here. If I were to use a volunteer application, that application then becomes the gateway into a scheduling page. If I were to go to a signup page, if I'm using the application, instead of giving me this list of jobs and shifts right away, it would actually ask for my first name and email address. If it recognizes that first name and email address, and we do have the ability to do whatever your application flow is. As an example, a lot of nonprofits who work with children, you will require background checks. We can support whatever those tools you use are in terms of tracking, and then you can change the status of a volunteer’s application. Once a volunteer is approved, they can go back into your scheduling page. You can email them, you can send out automatic emails, that lets a volunteer know, "Hey, thanks for applying, here's the next steps, we'll send you an email when you're eligible to sign up for shifts." Then the volunteer will use their first name and email as a gateway to get into that scheduling page. They will always have access to their profiles through their email address, so it's still secure in that the volunteer can't view any of that information without using the link that they have in their email. Your communication tab tools will all have the merge tag, so you can create templates for your emails that that volunteer profile link is going to be what replaces a username and a password. Darryl: Great, and actually one other questions popped in, does VolunteerLocal also support doing a text message communication as your reminder? Paige: You can actually schedule under our communication tools and again, if anyone's interested in a free trial, I'm more than happy to show you around and get you set up with an example of how, but our communication tools, you can build text reminders, schedule those to go out, schedule them later. We support different times zones. Schedule them now, maybe you've got last-minute emergency notification. We also do have automatic reminders through email. If I go into this example event, I'm going to scroll down to Messaging and Automation. If I wanted to schedule a reminder template to go out 24 hours before every single shift, I can add those that you don't have to think about scheduling reminders for any given event. You might want to send your thank-you email 24 hours after an event and that sort of thing. You can schedule both text messages and emails in terms of setting an automatic one that goes out every 24 hours or every time a shift happens. Right now, that's just for email, but you can still schedule text messages to go out, so down here where it says Schedule for Later, you can send a text a week before to remind people to double-check their shifts or whatever that might be. Great question. Darryl, I have this one pulled up. Darryl: Yes, actually well, and it ended up going back to the question of registration. Has there ever been an issue with access to personal info with the login being just an email address, if somebody happened to know that? Paige: Yes, we have never had any complaints to that. Again, anytime you're sending information to a volunteer, they have to be able to login to that email address, and so, can access the links that you send, or reminders that you send through their email. We've never had any complaints for any of our customers on that front in terms of security. Obviously, if a family member has access to someone's email, they might be able to do that, but to my knowledge, we've never run into any issues with it. If anything, people take a sigh of relief, when we say there are no usernames and passwords for coordinators, any volunteer coordinators, that's going to be a lot less work on getting constant emails from volunteers asking for their password to be reset. You can always put that volunteer profile link in any of your communication. Darryl: Got you, and actually I'm going to post to your email community address inside of the chat so people will know how they can get in touch with you afterwards. Then one of the other questions and I'll touch on this a little bit, when we get into the DP Text areas is does the person who's actually agreed to getting the texts, which there's going to be an opt-in requirements. That is probably part of the form that we use now to sign up for VolunteerLocal that you would actually verify that you agree at this. Paige: You can add obviously whatever questions you need to collect from volunteers, you'll check this box to validate that number, and then when a volunteer either signs up for a one-off event or fills out your application for, they will get a text message for a five-digit code right away, asking them to confirm their mobile number. They have to respond okay to that text message. They'll get an email, letting them know that they've confirmed their mobile number. You don't have the ability to send text messages out that way, only you will through your account. They won't be signing up for anything, it's just our internal communication tool that you can then schedule and send a text messages to go out. Darryl: Great. I know you've been showing us a little bit of the back end as we were going through this, as well as, I think you have a tab open from the volunteer's view. I guess I was just wondering, maybe from the volunteer perspective, it might be helpful to just walk me through signing up for a job, and the correct process and the finished process. Paige: Of course, so again this is an admin view. I'm logged into a demo account right now. This is an example event. You can create different jobs, add details to those jobs links, locations. We have password protection. Self-reporting is also an option now in response to the pandemic if you've got virtual volunteer opportunities that don't require a shift. You can get really detailed with what kind of opportunities you're offering, shift scheduler's really straightforward. I've already created a few examples shifts, choose your date, time, how many people you need, and then once you are ready for your program to go live, you can turn it online. Again, here's your public landing page. If I had a bunch of different events that I was managing, they would all show up on this example landing page. In fact, I'll show you an example landing page real quick. Ironman has given us permission to share out some stuff. Ironman uses VolunteerLocal for all of their different races in North America. You'll notice that we're at volunteerlocal.com. However, this page looks and acts just like the Ironman website. These volunteer opportunities, if I was a volunteer, let's say I wanted to volunteer for the Arizona Half Ironman. I can easily choose that event, see any of the opportunities that are available, sign up that way. I'll open up again, this is example one, we'll choose the shift, so if I'm a volunteer, everything will look like whatever you were nonprofit's website is, I'm going to use an example email here. Again, you can customize these questions, volunteer signs the waiver. There will be a scroll box. Especially in COVID times, if you've got COVID release, codes of conduct to all the different things, there will be a scroll box there. You can customize what the confirmation info is that shows up on that page. I can actually pull up this example email here in just a second. Here's an example of a confirmation message they'll get and this is all customizable. You can make it look much prettier than this example message. They'll be able to see whatever they signed up for. Click the Open their Profile button. This page would also be wrapped with your non-profit's website. They can update their info, they can add their shifts to their calendars. Again, all of those hours can get synced with DonorPerfect, cancel shifts, open the page to sign up for more. Again, you do have complete control over that volunteer flow, so if you are going to be needing to approve your volunteers for some events that maybe you don't just want the general public to be able to sign up, you can make a lot of, any of your URLs private in that regard. Darryl: Got it. Yes, and something that I've learned about VolunteerLocal is it can go from a very basic level of volunteering, very simplistic jobs to-- when I was looking at some of those Ironman jobs, and having 1,100 jobs within an individual event, and I'm sure you've got shifts, and profiles, and different qualities that you need to know about those donors, it gets very sophisticated fast. You can go from one extreme to the other very, very smoothly, that's great to see. Then, of course, after they've signed up for it, it becomes a check-in process where they could either download the mobile app or are there other ways that they can actually do the check-in to say, "I'm here to hand out water at the 5K."? Paige: Like I said, we're about to roll out the QR code check-in which allows QR-- everyone's using QR codes these days. You have just a printed QR code at the door of your nonprofit or onsite, a volunteer can just open their phone, scan, and check-in that way. We also have, and I'm just kind of showing this in the back end right now, if you were creating whatever your application flow is, you can totally customize that. If you're interviewing your volunteers before they're approved, onboarding, you could do all of that within VolunteerLocal. In terms of the check-in tools, this is an example check-in screen. This is an admin check-in screen. The reason for that is that it will have sensitive volunteer information, so if you are wanting to manage your check-in process, you can just click the clock icon, check the volunteer in and out. Here's an example of the admin view of a volunteer profile, change their applicant status, you can do notes on them, you can move them around to different volunteer opportunities, and any of your email and text templates, you can send those from within the volunteer's profile, see their service summary. That's the admin-facing check-in tool. We also have a very similar one, which is kiosk mode. That allows you to do walkup volunteering, or just build a basic kiosk where you have that open on a tablet or a mobile device. Volunteer walks up, and just types their name and clicks Check-in, so it protects their personal information, so if you want your admin users to be managing the check-in process, you can use our check-in screen, and if you want volunteers to be checking themselves in, you can either use kiosk mode, the mobile app, or QR code check-in. Darryl: Wow. It sounds like there's a lot of options there. Paige: There are. Darryl: [chuckles] One of the other things that comes up, and I know in my nonprofit that has between 400 and 500 volunteers that go ahead and serve the community, one of the debates that they have is there's one administrative person that manages a spreadsheet today, and they feel that they need to do that because the clientele is not ready to go ahead and do self-signups and so forth. Do you bump into that and what do you truly find as far as maybe an organization that serves seniors and has a lot of volunteer seniors, are you finding that the adoption is actually better than what those managers interpret it to be? Paige: Yes. It's kind of a mixed bag, and the good thing about VolunteerLocal is that it doesn't have to be volunteer-driven in terms of them signing themselves up. Because there are no user names and passwords that do help with a lot of those pieces, but you can also make it so volunteers can sign up even if they don't have an email. Obviously, you wouldn't be able to communicate with them, but you'll still be able to see that they've signed up. The other option is here, under volunteers, I went down to report, you can look at any of your different volunteer programs, see all the jobs you've got, the percentages to which they're filled. If I click on a job, it gives me the ability to look at each shift, if I've got current volunteers in that shift, I can see these example volunteers, also access that volunteer profile from the admin view here, and I can manually add volunteers. If you do have some of those volunteers who prefer to call and say, "I'm going to show up on these days," or, "I'm going to show up every Monday," you can always manually add a volunteer, and because you are the admin user, you can break the required question rule. If someone, if Joe calls, and Joe's been volunteering for 20 years with your organization, you know who Joe is, you don't need to put everything in, you could just put their first name in and still track them. If you put a volunteer's email address in because they've already worked with you, it'll prefill all of this information for you. Darryl: Fantastic. One thing that I saw on your screen there, and I know I wanted to touch on it was the background check. What's the process today to get a background check? It's so important in so many of our social service nonprofits. Paige: It is. Right now, we are officially integrated with a background check system called Verified First. That allows you to run a back background check directly in a volunteer's profile, so if I were to open an example profile, there are volunteer links. This is also where one of the DonorPerfect sync links would show up, so you can sync with DonorPerfect within a volunteer's profile or within the overall report if you just want do everybody at once. You could also, if Verified First were enabled, there's a button to just run a background check right within a volunteer's profile. If you have your own local, maybe your government agency runs this for you, what we will find is that a lot of people will create a hidden field question in volunteer information, and just call that background check status. There are a lot of different ways to collect info, so we might do a dropdown, call this Approved, Denied, Need more info, as an example, and then anytime you hide a field from a volunteer, it's still going to show up in a volunteer's profile, so if I go back to an example profile here, but it will not be visible to the volunteer. If I get an email from whatever background check system you're using that so-and-so's approved, I can easily pull up their profile, change the status of their background check to approved. It's also worth noting that we are actively trying to integrate with more background check systems for the same reason that Darryl just mentioned, that those are becoming increasingly more important, and so if you are already using a background check system, feel free to email it to me, and I can add to our list of possible integrations. Darryl: Awesome, and I did put your email address in the chat, and we can certainly provide that afterwards, and you may also have on your profile. I do see another question here in the Q&A that is, can we set a time before their commitment date when they can no longer cancel, example three days before the event? Paige: Yes. If I go into event detail, this is going to be where all those smaller behaviors live for any of your events. You can disable the ability to cancel a shift, so if you wanted to a few days before-- we are working on a tool where you can set automatically to disable it a few days before. We also have a shift swapping feature now, so if you wanted volunteers to not be able to cancel, but to just offer their shift out to other volunteers, that's an option as well. We can also accommodate minimum and maximum shift requirements. You'll have complete control over your signup page content, layout, all of that. Darryl: Awesome. One other question that came in, and I was hesitant to jump on the answer to this, is the data stored in the US or Canada? Paige: In the US, in Virginia, we do use Amazon, and I'm happy to send our data and security info to anybody who might need that. Darryl: All right. Perfect. Excellent. I think we've got most of the questions covered at this point, but certainly, the other areas that you would want to cover, maybe talk a little bit about the integration or go through that a little bit? Paige: Yes. Let's take a peek at this, just so people have a better idea of what that integration is capable of. Again, you can control how those records are matched. We'll make sure that all of the hard work is done on the back end for you so that essentially all you're having to do is click a button that says Sync, so our team will make sure that everything is good to go with your DonorPerfect ID. The sync will happen very quickly. You can click the button 20 times, it's not going to duplicate your information. Again, you're able to build out your own sync profile so that you can choose what pieces of information are getting sent to DonorPerfect. Again, this is all the DonorPerfect section of an admin profile. Obviously, your volunteer is not going to be doing that. You are simply going to have a sync to DonorPerfect option within your report. You can also do certain date filters to control when that information is getting pushed. Right now, we do have to click a button to perform a sync, it's just one click, but Brian, who is the developer and lead of all the things at VolunteerLocal, he came up with VolunteerLocal about 13 years ago for a small Des Moines based group, and it's really sprouted into something beautiful, so Brian, is the brainchild of all this, and he is working on a way to basically run the automatic reports, and syncs into DonorPerfect. Hang tight for that, but right now you do have to click one button. You're able to also create sync profiles. Sometimes you might want to send just a certain window of hours. Sometimes, you might want to have a full sync, so you can create different profiles for what a volunteer sync would look like. That way, you are able to manage your data the most efficiently. I won't dig too deep into all of the weeds with this, though I'm happy to, like I said, schedule a time to chat with any of you that wanted to talk more about the tech side of this integration. You can select multiple fields, get certain ones. We'll help you make sure that that data looks the way you want in DonorPerfect. Once you've run a sync, you can set up an email. Essentially that email will allow you to review that sync so you can see whose information was synced, if there were any potential conflicts. Maybe you need to merge some Donor profiles and Volunteer profiles, see what kind of tasks were sent over, so you will get a email to review of each sync. That's about it on that front. Obviously, I'll be in the virtual lounge if anyone wants to chat more, my email address, I know Darryl put it in the chat, it's also on the screen, and I'll make sure that the link to this presentation's available. We do have free trials. They default to two weeks but we're really flexible, especially with nonprofits. We know that time windows are unpredictable for everyone these days. We're very flexible if you need to try out our software with a few of your volunteers to see how they feel with that, I'd love to chat more. We can run through a demo of whatever makes the most sense for you and your org. We are offering a special for any of the conference attendees. Our pricing plans usually run for a calendar year, and so we are offering anyone who does schedule a free trial with us, a demo with us by the end of October or October 29th, and then upgrade by the end of 2021, which I still can't believe we're almost at the end of 2021. I said 2022 the other day and I was like, "Wait a minute. Aren't we still stuck in 2019?" If you sign up by the end of 2021, we'll make sure that that first year that you're with us was actually a 15-month. so three additional months of service at no cost. Darryl: Awesome. What a great deal, as well as a thank you so much for sharing all of the details of VolunteerLocal. As Paige mentioned, there is an integration that goes to DonorPerfect. You saw where she was actually matching up the fields, and I think one of the things that many of our users expect with the volunteer tool is to be able to see the number of hours worked inside of the other info records in DonorPerfect. That is what you will experience with VolunteerLocal, so you can get that cohesive view and I want to call them a constituent, because they may be a volunteer, they may be a donor, but at the end of the day, there's somebody who's very passionate about your organization and you need to be able to see both sides of that. That's the key to what we've been doing with the relationship here. Feel free to put any questions that you might have inside of the chat or the Q&A as it relates to the volunteer solution that Paige just presented. I see that there's about 160 of you inside the room, so surely there might be a question or two, and we're also going to then transition to the other part of the presentation, but I think Paige will stay on with us in case you think of something else that actually comes up while we were chatting about some of the other solutions that are out there. Don't hesitate to go ahead and ask any questions that you might have. Let me go ahead and queue up the other presentation. All right. Other than I think there is a very sincere Iowa fan, I think we have the chat covered at this point. Thank you, Josh Nelson, for that one. Our next topic is to really talk about other tools of engagement. Sincerely, we just heard from volunteering, which is perhaps one of the most sincere forms of engagement in your organization that you could experience. Somebody that's willing to give up their time to be knee-deep into whatever your programs are that you're offering, but as we just talked about, we need to cater to a diverse donor population, right? We heard all of that yesterday, about personalizing the experience for the donors, and that requires a diverse set of tools. You need to be able to meet the donor where they thrive, and whether that means meeting them for lunch, whether that means because they prefer email, or some other form of communication, your choice of communication may make the difference as to whether or not they become the loyal donor or not. What engagement methods do we see most nonprofits employing today? Well certainly, there's a website. People can find you through Google search, or you may also use social media. Ideally, all nonprofits here are probably using both of those. There was a discussion yesterday about events and how events have transitioned to virtual and now they may go hybrid, but certainly that's another way that you can engage people, and inform them of what you're doing inside of your organization. Email. We had a great presentation from Matt, from Constant Contact yesterday about how to write emails that will be more effective, especially during this time in the transition of the pandemic, but we're also going to talk a little bit about some, I don't want to call them new methods, but we're seeing adoption just continue to increase using SMS and texting to communicate with donors and using it as a fundraising technique. We'll talk a little bit about that feature next as well as the impact that video has had on communicating your message to your donor, whether it's a real-time video, or even just using video to describe the mission that you're working on. Personas and preferred channels. I know we sometimes, as a nonprofit community, have to look to the for-profits, as they oftentimes will lead the way in terms of how they use their marketing, and what channels are actually working to communicate with their clients, are things that we can model and use to communicate with our donors. One Twilio study found that consumers prefer email and text when communicating with brands, but wanted to make sure that I included a little byline underneath this, that out of the 2,500 people that they reviewed, there was a large dissatisfaction in terms of how businesses were approaching communication. However, they were very willing to reward the businesses that adhere to their preferred channels. If you're a person that wants to get texts, then your nonprofit should be offering that as a solution, and that will make me happier as a person who wants to digest that kind of content. I know for me personally, there's certain content I prefer in email, certain content I prefer in text. Maybe there's a mobile app, maybe there's different forms of communication that might be out there and it just depends what the subject matter is as to where I want to put it inside of my channel. The 2021 texting preferences. Which type of business communication was the most effective for reaching you quickly? Now, I think there is a qualifier here, in that quickly is important. A large percentage of people wanting to have a text message. What they're really discussing here are things like reminders for appointments, but also a great discount on a product or service. Now, a discount could be something that would correlate to perhaps a donation, or a drive, but if you're going to text a donor every day asking for a donation, you will probably quickly get disconnected from them as they shut down that communication path. It's no different than email, but for each one of those channels, there is probably an expected form of frequency, content, and delivery expediency that they expect. Now I'm going to talk a little bit about our partner product called DP Text, and how that can deliver on some of these needs that are out there. Clearly, the most popular form that we end up seeing is preparing for an event. It has become almost the de facto standard that at your events, that people will want to give via text, because it's something that they can do right there, while they're sitting in one of those chairs, that they could go ahead and make a donation but there are a few things that you might want to keep in mind as you prepare for your event. Texting does require opt-in, we talked about this during Paige's presentation. You can do that in a variety of ways, either a part of the registration on the weblink form. You can ask them for their mobile number and a check box to go ahead and opt in. You can include a widget on your event website or your actual homepage website, to allow people to enter their mobile number and sign up, or at the event. You can say text whatever your string, is to whatever the phone number may be, and that is an implicit opt in for the event as well as QR codes on the table. That's a new feature that came about in the last few months from our DP Text product, so that you can go ahead and scan that and opt into it. Then the question comes up is after you've opted into the event, what other information should be provided? You can let attendees know that you will be offering texts to give at the event, so that they can prepare themselves for it. Pre-event emails and texts, maybe what will be on stage, whether or not you're going to have an auction, as well as including signage on the tables to let them know that this is an option that's available to them, and getting your speaker at the front of the room to tell people about it, and to maybe invite at them multiple times, as long as they're asked, but to go ahead and give them the very easy instructions that if you just text this to this number, putting it on the screen behind you, you can then go ahead and contribute to the event. Then of course, throughout the evening, you want to make sure that you're giving them goal updates, and you make the ask, show the progress bar. Here's an example of a text message, and you actually can go ahead and try this yourself. We have a demo set up for it. Our demo nonprofit is called Coral Acres. You can see here that on my first response, I was given a link that I can go ahead and complete my donation form. When you make a donation through DP Text, it's actually utilizing the DonorPerfect, or any of our partner product online giving forms, that will actually feed directly into DonorPerfect. That's actually what gives you the thermometer effect inside of your event. I'll show you a little bit of that in some of the following screens, but the other thing I want to communicate about DP Ttext is that is actually has a scripting language. You can tell it to give options like this bottom text down below to say volunteer to donate your time, which would actually give you a signup that would register in a report that you can run out of DP Text, or you can even type in the word video, and they'll send you a link to a video, newsletter, a gala, all of that is completely programmable. Here's an example of launching into what a mobile web link form would look like after you've sent out that DP Text message, or taking them to your YouTube feed for the video. Then of course, as I was talking about, in the event fundraising page, and this is really important to show your progress throughout the night to see how close you're coming to your goal. Of course, the closer you get, the more intense that the asks can be to try and get you over that edge, if you will. This actually updates by reading the data inside of DonorPerfect. Even if you had checks that were written prior to the event, and they get input and coded into the DonorPerfect system with the right solicitation and campaign and date range and so forth, the meter will actually pick up that content and can be displayed at the front of your room. You get a very holistic view that is out there today. Then when your event finishes, how would you continue to use texting? Obviously, a thank you message to everybody that came, that used the text-to-give feature. You can send out links of the event videos or photos, that might be out there. Of course, everybody likes to see themselves after the event. Any status updates on the funds raised, as well as the ongoing and the long-term communication that you may use via emails, how the funds were used, and then maybe providing monthly updates thereafter just to keep them engaged with your non-profit today. While I want to say that 80% to 90% of our DP Text clients actually start with it being an event-based text-to-give system, the longer-term implications is you just opened up a communication channel with your donors that you can use to push out some of the additional info that occurs throughout the year to keep them engaged within your organization. I pasted in a DP Text screen. This is actually the ability to do a one-off text, where I could say, "Hello, board members we had a great, whatever the event was. Here's what our updates are." We can actually segment your text users so that they're going to get distinct messaging. One of the other things, and now that I know that Josh Nelson is here with us, from our product perspective, is we're exploring ways that we could possibly put a one-to-one texting tool inside of DonorPerfect, where right from the donor's record, you would be able to click the text button, and go ahead and send a message right to that donor, as long as they have a mobile number inside of their system. Certainly, if there's a suggestion vote or something, that you wanted to go ahead and chip in to suggest that, we'd like to hear from you to see whether you feel that that would be a useful tool for you and your donors. Lastly, you can jot this down. If you want to try and explore using our text-to-give the product, as I showed you, it's actually scripted, so you can run one of the scripts by texting the word CORAL to 501-200-4449. Again, this video is available to you. I can also paste that information in to the chat when we get a chance. This is a way for you to go ahead and try that. While we're on the subject of engagement, I wanted to also touch on two other ways that you can keep people, your donors, really motivated and engaged. The DP Video product has been something brand new that we released the tail end of last year. Actually, everyone that is a DonorPerfect client has the opportunity to use this free trial. It's interesting. I go to conferences a lot, and I mention to people about the new things in DonorPerfect, and mention this, and it's hard for us to even get the word out into your inboxes. It is available to all of you to go ahead and try 10 free video emails, and see how it works, but let's talk a little bit about what it is. I'm just going to do a quick check, a check in the chat here. One person that commented that for-profit organizations mirroring, yes, definitely. The texting product is available now in the US and Canada. We can support both. There's been some weird things that have gone on with the SMS messaging rules and regs. The old shortcode system that we used to use in the US is really no longer available. That's why you'll actually see that we are using 10 digit numbers today. Thank you, Josh, for that suggestion vote idea, and Catherine for your enthusiasm, for the one-to-one texting, but back to DP Vdeo. Right from your DonorPerfect screening, I circled the Send Video button. Again, this is free for you to try for 10 videos, go ahead and click that button. Then you're presented with a form. It's actually going to pop open a new tab for DP Video. It gives your name, your email address, and it automatically will pull in who the recipient email is. I can actually type a little message. When I click the Record Video button down at the bottom, I am brought to an actual live screen inside of my browser, that I can go ahead and record my video, send you a message, smiles, all kinds of things that I might want to be able to pack into that. If you think about the personalized handwritten notes that so many nonprofits send to donors, think about how much more personal and actual live video from the executive director is. We are seeing this as the technology replacement for some of those handwritten notes. Again, maybe they don't completely disappear, but it's about personalizing that experience and helping that donor to feel like you are actually catering to them that makes a huge difference. Then of course, once the email is sent, this is what my inbox email preview looks like. I get a little snippet of my video. If you're familiar with the GIF technology that is out there, it's actually a GIF. It's a bit of a motion video that appears inside of your inbox. As soon as you click the link, then you're taken to a landing page where they can go ahead and play the video. No YouTube ads,, so you're not sharing it out in that format. This is actually a hosted-by-DP video product. You can define your own background and messaging, and you can even put a Donate button that is out there. The product itself, the video is shareable by social. We also get some feedback on the number of email forwards that we see on these DP videos messages that are going out to individuals saying, "Isn't this cool? My nonprofit just sent me this personal message from their executive director," and then they forwarded it to 20 of their friends. That ends up promoting some of your donor acquisition that's out there. Lastly there, of course, is an integration. The DP contact records are updated whenever you send video email to one of your constituents. Quick reminders here, the DP Video product is a free trial. All DonorPerfect clients at any level have it, you've got 10 free video emails to try use them. Selectively send them to your board, your major donors, maybe your volunteers even, to give you that personalized message, and go ahead and give it a try. Certainly, our support team is ready there to go ahead and handle anything that should come up with it. Let me just go ahead and check some of our messages and questions that we might have that are out there. Is there a new discount for current DP users? I'm not sure if that was the DP Text or the DP Video one. I think both of these products actually have some special promos as a result of the conference that you can take advantage of. Can that mass video messages be sent at the same time? There actually are two levels of the DP Video product. The basic one that I just showed you is a one-on-one intended solution. Then there is also a premium version of the DP Video product that allows you to do mass-market email videos, where you could actually attach a video of your message. Really, really, quite great questions there. Let me just check my Q&A here. Looks like there's some volunteer questions that are out there. Great. Questions have been completed, awesome. All right, any other questions about DP Video or sending video emails? There will be a Dp Text promotion that will be going out to signup for a future year, which is 10% off in that coming year. All right, the last product that I wanted to touch on is something that is quite new. It's from a partner has been up there for some amount of time. Again we're under the headline here of engagement. There's nothing like keeping your donors fully engaged by thanking them, and thanking them quickly. Josh Nelson could even chime in with the prizes that we used to give out for the client, the DonorPerfect client that actually had the fastest response times to thanking there donors. It is really key to making sure that your donors are engaged. One of the things that we were searching for was this idea if we could automatically thank with a direct mail piece. Now, we're in the world where I can give an online donation and within seconds, I get an email thank you. That may be perfectly fine for me. Industry statistics say that you should thank a donor as many as seven times for the gift that they have given. Those thank-yous probably should be coming in different flavors, so tou're making sure that it's reaching them. With a AppealMaker, what they've done is they've actually built an integration to create automatic printed thank-you letters. Literally, "Look mom, no hands," I don't have to touch anything because once you setup the integration, you choose a template inside of the AppealMaker system system. The donor perfect API integration that they built actually views all the gifts that you receive nightly. It finds those with a matching thank-you letter code that you've identified in AppealMaker system. The letters are printed, stamped and mailed out overnight from the AppealMaker officers, within 24 to 48 hours. Fully automatic. LI was saying, really should be thanked seven times to know that there's an appreciation for their gift that is out there. This is just one of those ways that you can actually streamline one of those touch points, and still give them that paper copy, that paper feel that you might have out there. What you do for the other six ways? Could be the email thank you, could be the video email thank you, it could actually be a handwritten note. Some of those don't need to go away but you need to consider who your donors are and what kind of appreciation you should be showing them. Here are some examples of products that AppealMaker offers, that actually can work with the integration. If you wanted to send a holiday thank-you card or something to that effect that is actually tied directly to the thank-you system as well as they can do all of the campaign materials. If you wanted to do a mass mailing campaign. Once you're inside of their system, this is the fully electronic layout to your letter or message that you want to communicate to your donor, and to give them thanks. Then here is what the integration looks like., where you can select the thank-you code inside of the donor perfect system. You can add multiples of those. Then the next one is, is it actually runs through the process and gives you the list of all the people that it found that gave you a gift, that it will actually be sending out a direct mail piece. Some creative innovation, leveraging some technology that's been around for ever which has been direct mail and direct mail thank-yous, but just another way that you can connect with your donors, and try and streamline your efforts. We are at about 10 minutes past the hour, and I just wanted to start to do a wrap up here. These are just highlights to some of the products that are out there that help you make the connection with your donors and increase engagement. If there are any questions, go ahead and send them into the general chat or Q&A. Let me just take a quick peek on our Q&A here. The addition cost for DB Text is either at a-- they have both event pricing in your round pricing. I believe the entry level's at $89 month right now for DP, text or $500 for a single event. Then how do you access the thermometer showing the results of the campaign? DP Text itself now includes both a pledge thermometer. so the gift thermometer. You would get a separate login to the gift thermometer and all Dp Text accounts are now including both of those thermometers. You also can buy the thermometer independently for $10 a month if you just want to put a campaign on your website and allow them to click the link and go ahead and see the people that have contributed to whatever that campaign is. I took a cruise thorough a number of our client's campaign meters, and I've been seeing a lot of them that are actually not just for the gala event, but they are for hitting a specific target. I know with my non- profit, when COVID hit they set out a goal trying to reach a $250,000 Close the Gap campaign. Over a period of three months we ended up getting those donations and grants that actually allowed us to close that gap. Was super effective in being able to communicate what our success rate was and how far we were from goal/ and beeing able to nudge that along. All right, any other questions out there? Go ahead and put them in the chat or put them in the Q&A. Happy to go ahead and answer those, all right. Well, I guess I'm taking a look at what's coming up next on our agenda. I believe we are headed for a bit of a 15-minute break here today. Yes, from 1:30 to 1:45, you will be able to take a little bit of a break. If there are no other questions that you have, feel free to visit page inside of our VolunteerLocal lounge, where you can also just one on one chat with her if you go to their exhibit groups. I just want to thank everyone for your time and attention with this session. I guess feel free to reach out to me, either if there's a product that you feel that D DonorPerfect should work with or we are currently working with and you'd like us to extend that functionality, go ahead and reach out to me. Thank you so much and enjoy the rest of the conference. Paige: Bye, thank you, everyone.

Data Cleanup Part 1: What You Need to Know

How can I build and strengthen relationships with my donors in the proper way if my reports are not providing me with the right data?

Data Cleanup Part 1: What You Need to Know

Description

How can I build and strengthen relationships with my donors in the proper way if my reports are not providing me with the right data? Filters and reports are not only used to find the data that provides you lists and financials, they are used to pinpoint those troublesome areas of your database that may need some attention. We’ll show you some methods on finding your inconsistent data so you can make edits and get back to the accurate data you need to use your database as the fundraising tool it’s intended to be.

Transcript

Sean McClellan: Good afternoon or morning, depending on where you are everybody. My name is Sean McClellan. I am here with my wonderful colleague Janet Carroll. Today we're going to be talking about what it is that you want to look for, for data entry. Janet, if you can move to our next slide for me. Thank you so much. Like I said, we'll be discussing the filters and reports that are going to help you find out which data points need to be cleaned up in your systems. We're going to go over methods that you can use to find inconsistent data in your database. That way, we can get it cleaned up and have your system work as a tool with you not against you. This is Part 1 of a two-parter. Hopefully, you'll be joining Arlene and Donna for data cleanup part two. In the meantime, let's take it away, Janet. Janet Carroll: Thanks so much, Sean. I appreciate that. I want to start off our conversation today by asking everybody to think about a few questions about their experiences. Have you ever printed envelopes or mailing labels, only to find that you're missing address information? Have you ever searched for a donor, only to find that they have two or more records in your database? What about wanting to report on the success of an event, only to find that gifts are missing data, that the results are not what you expected simply because the details were missing? Have you ever sent email receipts only to get an invalid email message? How about running a corporate donor report, only to find that individuals and families were included? I wonder how many times you can say yes to any of these points. If so, you're in the right place today because we want to talk about indeed the benefits of having clean data. We want to discuss what to look for in your database. What you'd be aware of when you're doing your day to day data entry. What about some data cleanup tools? We'll discuss some valuable selection filters that you can save in your system for future retrieval as you make periodic and regular data checkups as part of your database maintenance. We'll also go over and demonstrate some reports so that you can get a look at your entire database to find any inconsistent or incomplete data. Now, as reminder from what Sean just said, we're going to be discussing what to look for. Our colleagues, Arlene and Donna, are going to show you how to clean that up later today. Let's get started discussing the benefits of good data. Efficient mailings to deliverable addresses. We want you to spend less time cleaning up your mailing list before you stuff those envelopes and work time carrying out your mission, making sure that your addresses indeed are complete and, as we say, mailable. When I think about detailed receipts, I'm thinking about sending them out on a timely basis, which is so much easier when our data is complete and it's in good shape, ready to be in condition to be merged into your receipts. When I think about accurate reports, I'm thinking about good data, complete data, and consistent data, allowing you to see what efforts worked and what didn't work in the past, allowing you to better plan your future events, appeals, and fundraising efforts. When I'm thinking about those focused constant contact lists, I'm thinking about getting the most out of that group email, putting your messages in the hands of people that will benefit from them the most. Think about your list requirements. If your list is based on a particular supporter of certain efforts, make sure that those details are documented and that your selection filters indeed reflect this, such as wanting your current board members in a list for them by themselves. Make sure they're noted most likely as a flag value in your database and then make sure your selection filter reflects that code. We want you to make sure of course that your data overall is more valuable allowing you to get the information you want when you want it. We want you to succeed because of your data, not in spite of it. Let's start out what we should be looking for in your database. Let's start out with our constituent records. Think now on your main bio screens, starting with duplicates. We want you to make sure that your records are indeed consolidated, so your reports are accurate. Your financial reports and your records are up to date. When it's time to send out those year-end receipts, you're only sending out one letter or email per donor. The last thing we want to do is bombard a donor with two or three different letters that they then have to organize before filing their taxes. What about the organization checks box and donor type deal? Do these values support each other? How about our addresses along with the Do Not Send Mail and the No Mail Reason field? They all lined up together. When we switch hats for a moment and look at our financial records, I'm thinking now about how consistent my coding is. Do you use general ledger where allocated, where you're going to be applying or allocating this money, the money that came in? Are your solicitations representing your appeals and events? Do your thank you letter choices represent unique messages? You have corresponding letter and email templates to go along with them. Thinking now on a more global or general basis, I'm thinking now about my coding in general. Do you have consistent naming conventions, which makes coding easy to manage and organize? How about duplicated or repeated code descriptions? Maybe you have multiple values in the same system in the same field. We're now talking about the descriptions, not the codes because the codes we know will be unique. What about expired codes? Do you have any codes that are no longer active that may be safely inactivated? Let's take a look at these items in more detail, starting with fields on the main screen. Look at this organization field. This checkbox is that lined up with your donor type field. Is your address missing any data? Take a look at your mailing, your physical address fields. Is it missing data? If it is, is the Do Not Send Mail box checked off along with an appropriate reason? What about the flag codes? Are any of them overlapping with your donor type field? We want you to make sure that your flags represent the details, the attributes, those familiar constituency type codes. Your donor type is more general, representing indeed the type of organization with the flags one level down a little bit more of a deeper dive. Let's take a look and let's demonstrate some of these fields. I'm going to come into our database here. Let's do a quick search and let's take a look here at the amazing foundation. Let's take a look at some of these fields. Wow. You know what? I have a foundation here. You know what? The Organization box is not checked. Let me check that off. My fields here realign themselves appropriate from organization record. Look at this. I'm looking over here at my donor type, one of my key fields that we've been talking about, and it's blank, better fill this in. I'm going to use foundation. I see that my address is completely filled in, which is great. I'm seeing that they are indeed a mailable record. I can send to the amazing foundation, not only because the address information is filled in, but they're also not marked Do Not Send Mail. Let me scroll down a little bit and take a look at my flag value. Oh, I see that my flag value also has a value of foundation, which is duplicating. It's overlapping my donor type. I'm going to come into my Select Flags. The first thing I'm going to do is remove my foundation value here. I'm going to click Save. I removed that flag value so I could have that foundation designated in only one place. I only wanted within the donor type. You know what? I want to go one step further. I'm going to edit my flag choices, Manage Codes, and I'm going to inactivate my foundation choice for the moment and make myself a note that I need to come in and check my flag value of foundation and compare that to my donor type of foundation and make sure that I only have my foundation as a donor type that I have it in there as my preferred way of designating it at that higher level. Now, I have a good set of flags or a better set of flags, knowing that I should be looking later on to look at all of my flag values, compare that to all indeed of my donor types. Let's come back into our presentation. Now let's go to our Gift and Pledge screens and look at some of the details here. Is my General Ledger field filled in and being used in a consistent way representing the allocation of my funds where that money was intended by the donor, and by filling out my Solicitation field, representing my fundraising effort? Is it being used for gifts? Just like I'm asking that same question about general ledger, is that also being used for all of our transactions? Does my gift or pledge have the correct Thank You Letter code assigned? Is it representing that unique message that I want to send out when I get to that receiving process? I'm going to come back into the database now and let's go into another record and take a look at our gift transaction. You know what? I am going to save my changes for that amazing foundation. Now let's come back up and do another search. Let's pick another record here. Let's choose an individual this time. We'll choose Henry Arnold, and I'm going to come into gifts. Let's edit one of our gifts here. As I'm looking here, I see I have a check, but you know what? I don't have a check number. I'm going to make a note of that to make sure I could find it from finance and fill it in because you know what? My receipt might indeed display my cheque number and is not my initial thank you letter. It might be part of my end of your tax letter. That method of payment along with the check numbers is something we need to think about. I'm looking at my gift transactions, my details here, and I'm seeing that I have a general ledger of membership. You know what? I sent out and they responded. Henry responded to my annual appeal. Wait a second. Is my annual appeal raising money for membership? I don't think so. I'm going to start at my general ledger and see where it should be. It looks like my annual appeal, looks like that should be the value, but wait a second. Before I actually finish selecting that, I'm looking here and I see what in the world is this Gooley Campaign 2018 doing here? This looks more like a solicitation code. We'll talk more about that later, but this is something I just noticed. My campaign code is not filled in for my annual appeal. Let's designate that now. My sub solicitation, I don't have one. No more details for my solicitation. Now when I come down to my Thank You template, the big question is, should I be sending out my standard acknowledgment, or should I send out something more specific thanking somebody for supporting my annual appeal? I like this option better. I'd like to say thank you for the unique message to which they responded. Some things to think about. I'm going to click Save. Let's move on to the next topic system codes. We all know that good coding practices can make or break the system. You're going to be able to run reports faster, more effectively, and certainly more accurately with good codes. When I'm thinking about consistent naming conventions, I think about making sure my codes in each field uniquely follows a similar theme. It makes it easier to find them in drop down lists, selection filters, add in the sidebar. Let's keep the codes themselves shorter. We recommend between two and six characters. Depending on the type of code, it makes it easier to navigate and manipulate data when I've exported it out of donor. Perfect. An example might be Annual Appeal 2021 compared to 2021 annual appeal. Let's make sure that we are consistent with the descriptions as well as the codes behind the seat. Do I have AA21 or AA_21 or maybe 2021 annual appeal? There's all different ways we want you to be consistent. You are reporting it. All the efforts later on is going to pay off big time. What about codes in the right fields? Are your relationships and roles in the flag field? Are your income accounts and designations in your general ledger field? Are your appeals and events in your solicitation code field? Moving on to our code descriptions, we want to avoid duplicating those. The word descriptions here is indeed a key word. A lot of organizations have too many cooks in the kitchen as they say. Sometimes we end up with multiple choices for the same designations. With different codes behind the scenes, the unique codes allows the database to accept it. We want to make sure that we have as an example, only one choice for Gala 2021. If you're not looking and assume that it's not there, without looking, you might create another Gala 2021 winner that was already in the list, but it was accepted because you created your unique code for it. Something to think about. Expired codes. We want you to make sure that you deactivate time sensitive codes periodically. You're probably not going to need that year end appeal 2015 any time soon. Let's clear it out of the drop down list and make sure that that drop down list is easier to manage with only current relevant choices in the list. I want to remind you that a deactivated code still exists in DonorPerfect. You're just not deleting that code. You're not removing it from the record. You can still of course use it when you're running reports. You're just taking the code out of that drop down list. Let's take a look in the database and let's review some examples within the database. I'm going to come here to my settings menu and focus not only on codes. I'm going to come here to Code Maintenance. Let's take a look at some of our fields. Let's start off by looking at general ledger. Here are all my choices. They're all active codes as we can see with those green checkmarks. Here, I mentioned before, we have what looks to me like a solicitation in the middle of my general ledger. I need to look and compare my codes. What's going on with my solicitations for this? Do I have a solicitation for this in that solicitation fields, or maybe even campaign? I need to review all of my fields, see where the data belongs and where that money for this Gooley campaign should be allocated. Is my annual appeal going into its own bucket or is it raising money for something specific that I should be using in its place? Some things to think about. Let's come down to solicitation now. Your solicitation. Let's click Go. First, I'm looking at all of my codes, my active as well as my inactive codes, but I'm gonna focus right now on my active codes. I'm going to hide my inactive ones. First in the list, I see it starts off with 2021 because this is alphabetical by my descriptions. At a quick glance, all of my years are at the right hand side, Annual Appeal 2021. Oh, I have two of them. That is not good. I need to consolidate. I need to find in the database, which one if not both of these that are being used and indeed consolidate, move that into only one field, one coded value there. Then I could remove when I'm getting rid of a duplicate, I could then get rid of not just an activate, it's active code. I certainly want to keep it active. It's a current code to the one that I'm no longer using. Once the data is out of there, I can then remove it, delete it from the database. I'm looking down further and I see that I have my Fall Gala 2019. I'm going to inactivate that. I have my Fall 2020, my Fall Gala 2020, my Fall Mailing. Here's my fall mailing 2020 but my 2021 is in different naming convention. I'm going to edit this right now and I'm going to fix this up. I'm going to change my description first and foremost. Let's put this at the end to be consistent with the rest of my data. We're going to come back here. Let's take a look at this. My old code was being used, so I'm going to ask the database to change my coding scheme from the old value to the new value. Now I have my fall mailings. I need to decide which is a better coding scheme and adjust accordingly. Okay, I would need to talk to my data manager to see. I like the underscores. They make it easier to read. Last year's was a different way. You know what? I'm going to inactivate last year's. I'm going to inactivate some of my older codes because they're not current. I do not plan on using any of these codes anytime soon, just in reports. Let's come back to our presentation now. Let's talk about setting up selection filters. We know that we could ask the database to run reports and find data that might be missing or are inconsistent. We could look at data as we started to do already today, looking at one field at a time, but we know that the database can also work harder for us if we ask the right questions. I like to ask the database where I have incomplete addresses. Instead of looking individually at each of these fields, I can ask where any of these fields is incomplete, is blank, or null. Here you can see in my diagram here for the selection filter I’m asking where the address is null, or the city or the state or the zip code. I look at this. I am saving it so I can easily retrieve it later on. I can look for missing salutations. I could be asking the database, where is the Do Not Send Mail box checked if I forgot to fill in a reason for it? To me, this document supports the reason why that box is checked. What about the donor type? Is that matching my organization checkbox? What about duplicate other addresses? Sometimes other addresses table can get filled up with duplicates up from the main screen when you have the address tracking turned on. Having a filter for this allows you to locate them quickly and easily, help you determine which ones are worth keeping, and which can be safely removed. I want to challenge you to share your ideas. I'm asking you to go to that chat box and share your thoughts. What kind of filters would you be using to check data in your database? Remember, put your ideas to share in the chat. Put your questions to Shawn and I in the Q&A section. I now want to turn the tables a little bit and look at some gift data clean-up filter ideas. Like the address fields, I also want to look at blank gift fields. Think about some of the key fields that are crucial to my data entry, to my receiving, to my report. Remember, every donation comes from a fundraising effort and has a purpose. It's why you raise money in the first place. Every single gift in your system should have a general ledger code to allocate the funds, solicitation code, whatever we're successful with that your donor responded to, and maybe even also the gift type how they paid. It’s good to keep track of all of this, of course, and more. You may even have some important custom fields that you've added to your database. You can use selection filters to find the donations that are missing them. What about segmented solicitations? You get the most out of your database if you keep your events and appeals with the year and season on it, letting you better track goals, expenses, response rates, and all kinds of additional information. You can build filters to find which solicitations have been properly segmented, which ones haven't been, and update your database to maximize your financial reporting effectiveness. What about appropriate thank you letters? Many organizations use a one-size-fits-all approach for receiving. Where you are sending out a standard or general thank you letter, but certain appeals and events might warrant specific thank you messages. Therefore, you want to have choices in your thank you letter field for each unique message that you want to send out to your donors. Do you have other ideas? Again, I challenge you to share those thoughts in the chat. Put any questions you have in that Q&A box. While you're doing that, I'm going to come into our database and what I'd like to do now is create some selection filters, show you how to do this process, and save them just like we've been talking about. I'm going to come into my settings and filters area knowing that my goal is to simply create and save. Later on, we could run reports using them. I'm going to come in here and add a new filter. What I'd like to do first is create that first filter that we saw looking for an incomplete address. I'm going to start down here with step number one, always a best practice step number one. My address fields are my main bio. I have that but my favorite fields I don't see address listed, so I'm going to click all fields. I'm going to ask for my address field where that's null or blank. I'm going to add more criteria. My criteria, my address is null. In step five, I'm going to stay in main bio. Now I'm looking for my city field. I'm going to ask for my city field. Again, is null or blank. Add more criteria. You'll notice my main bio was still there. My default based on my last field used the main bio. Now I need to come down to state. Here's my state field. Ask where that one is also null or blank. Add more criteria, main bio, and finally, ask for my zip code. As for that field is null or blank. I could click Get More Criteria if I want to see it all together here. I'm going to click Continue. Now I see those four fields that are being assessed, but I don't want to ask where they're all missing, I want to ask where any of them is missing so I can have efficient address checking. Whether they're all blank or any of them are blank, I want to get that larger report so I can make one big fell swoop analysis of all my data to review that. I'm going to say OR and I'm going to save my filter. I'm going to say, "Incomplete Addresses." You know what? I want to save this and I don't have anything that says data cleanup. I don't have a folder just for that purpose. I'm going to add a new filter folder and I'm going to say, "Filters for Data Cleanup." I'm going to save that. Now I'm going to have one place to come later on that I know that I'm going to be using for each of my data cleanup reports. I'm going to click Share across all Users so my colleagues will have access to that as well and click Done. Here is my folder now highlighted in orange. Let's take another look. Let's create another filter. Add New Filter. Let's look for a quick one. I'm going to ask for blank salutations. Again, main bio. Look for my salutation. I don't see that. I'm going to come in here. All my fields. Let's do my salutation. Let's ask for that’s blank, and Continue. I'm going to say, "Salutation is missing." You know what? I'm going to put that in my same filter folder for data cleanup and share it. This to me is just as key to the incomplete addresses because we want to avoid saying, "Dear friend." We want to have our personal emails, our personal letters. We want to make our potential supporters, our prospects, our volunteers. We want to have that feel-good moment that the person receiving our communications knows that we know who they are. We know that if they have a nickname, we know how they like to be addressed. Let me go do one more main biotype of demonstration here that I want to compare two fields. Let's do an Add New Filter. I'm going to ask for the donor type. I'm going to ask for main bio. I'm thinking now about where my donor type is not matching my organization checkbox. I'm going to ask first of all where my donor type is not equal to individual. There we go. I'm going to add more criteria. When my donor type is not an individual, I'm concerned. If my organization checkbox says that it is an individual, that's also a main biofield. My organization checkbox is not here, so I'm going to click All Fields. Let me come down and find my organization field. Here it is. I have my donor type not an individual. Now it's a concern if my organization checkbox is not checked if that looks. like an individual. Here it is. I have my organization checkbox not checked, which says it is an individual, but my donor type says it's not an individual. That's a problem. I'm going to say, "Organization is not checked and done our type is not individual." There we go. I'll have to abbreviate a little bit so I can get the next few characters in here. Again, one of my data cleanup filters, and I'm going to share it and click Done. Let's move over to a gift-based filter. Let's click Add New Filter. I'm going to go into gift pledge. Now I'm looking and I'm thinking about some of those key fields on my Gift and Pledge screens. I'm going to say start in gift pledge. I'm going to ask for my general ledger. Here's my general ledger, whether that's blank. I'm going to add more criteria. I'm going to ask for, in Gift / Pledge again, where my solicitation is blank or null. I'm also going to look where that method of payment is also missing on my Gift screen. I'm going to look at Gift / Pledge again. My gift type, I'm going to ask for that smaller blank. I'm going to click Continue. Here are my three values. Some of my fields. Again, you might have a longer list of fields here depending on what you define as your key fields. I'm going to ask where this is OR so any one of these is blank, I want that to immediately come to my attention. I'm going to ask for my general ledger or solicitation, or my gift type is null. I'm going to put that in my filters for data cleanup and share across all users. I think you get the idea that I can set these up and use them within reports. I'm going to come back into our presentation now. Let's move on exactly to that topic about reporting. I'll mention a few reports and then demonstrate that with you. Our donor names and addresses sounds like a simple report, and it's so valuable naturally. We like to see some of this information even look through it before we generate some mailings. This again is one of our go-to reports. We want to be able to see the address information that we've been talking about. The counter-report, one of my personal favorite reports, it counts the number of occurrences for each value within the field, allowing you to see how often a value is being utilized. The giving summary by selected fields, another very popular report while we're focusing on one field, grouping the donations by this field of your choice, allowing you to see which codes are being used and how often, of course, and the results of your efforts, the results by that particular selected field. The cross-tabulation report allows you to compare two fields at the same time and see how they interact. Think about it, the general ledger compared to solicitation. Your solicitation compared to sub-solicitation to make sure the allocations are appropriate. The only rule here is that one of these fields in the cross-tabulation report must be a gift or pledged field that has to be a financially based field. Export to file, certainly a fan favorite. It allows you to download data from DonorPerfect into a CSV file. You can build a custom set of instructions. We call that an export template to ensure that you only get the fields that you want, that you need. By including a table-specific IDs such as donor ID, or gift ID, you can make it easy to clean up the information in the spreadsheet and import it back in. Our colleagues Donna and Arlene are going to be talking about this later today. We know that data cleanup is certainly an ongoing process. Your data needs to be reviewed on a regular basis. We're all human. We know that we make mistakes. We do expect to continue working all the time to clean up our messes, to clean up our data, to check in with our data. In order to stay on top of our data cleanup, we should be running reports on a regular basis. Before I even get to my first bullet points of monthly or quarterly, I'm going to give a quick shout-out and a reminder to our transaction listing report within receipts. My hope is that you're doing a review before generating your receipts so that we don't even have to rely solely on that monthly or quarterly review for all of your data checks. This is in addition to all of those regular checks and balances. We don't want you to be surprised with a few 100 duplicate records before you send out your year-end appeals or annual consolidated receipts. Certainly, after a major appeal or event, consider deactivating your solicitation codes so you don't have to worry about cleaning up dozens of codes at the end of the year. I'd like to come into the database right now and explore some of these reports, show you how we can pull together what we've been talking about so far. I'm going to come into Reports and Report Center. The first report I want to talk about is the donor names and addresses report. Here we go. I'm going to select my report. Remember, I have a filter that I created before about my incomplete addresses. I'm going to start my sidebar again at the top always a best practice. I'm going to check my box at the top. I'm going to first write it on my entire database, where am I missing in address information? I'm going to sort my data alphabetically. I can have a title for data cleanup. Incomplete addresses. I'm going to make sure my sidebar fields are blanked out. I'm going to remove the last filter that I created. I'm going to come in here and apply a filter from my data cleanup folder. I have incomplete addresses. I'm going to select that and let's run my report. I have a five-page report. Let's go to the end of my report. Let's see here. I have 205 records that have incomplete addresses. Now looks like some here has missing a zip code, others are missing more information than that. Some have nothing in here. Remember, I have right now 205 but that includes my no mailings. I'm going to remove, eliminate my no mail addresses and let's rerun this report. Out of my 205 that were missing from my entire database, and to say some kind of address information, you know what? I have 138 that are more to be mailed. They're not eliminated that Do Not Send Mail is not checked, that I'm still missing information here. What's the purpose? I need to go through these 138, try to fill in the addresses. If I can't fill them in right now, I need to mark them Do Not Send Mail with an incomplete address by default, then they won't be included in my next mailing, but I'll have them as a group marked as incomplete addresses within my Do Not Mail reasons, so I could find them later and work on them. For now, I don't want 138 envelopes for mailing labels that are printed on that are incomplete waste of time, money, and resources. We want you to save time and energy. Use your time well. I'm going to come into reports and report center. No, I'm not going to save my changes here. I'm going to show you my counter-report. Let's look at my database from a field that you want to analyze. Starting at the top in my sidebar, I'm going to say let's go to my main bio screen, and I'm going to look at my donor type field. Here's my donor type. I'm going to make sure that I have no restrictions whatsoever in here. Let's run my report. Now I have 10 records that have a blank donor type. I fixed one earlier, otherwise, this would have been 11. Then I can click on this number 10. I see my records and I can click into each of them. This is small enough group. I can click into each of them and fix it right on the spot. A good use of time, a quick data check. While I'm there, I want to make sure that my organization checkbox goes along with the donor type that I'm about to fill in. Let's close this drill down here. I'm going to change my report. Let's come into the report center. I'm going to now find my giving summary by selected field. Let's take a look here. This doesn't have a sidebar, but so like the sidebar, always start at the top and work our way down. I'm going to focus on my current calendar year and that is my default right now. I get to choose my field of choice. I'm going to leave this right now as general ledger, but I don't want to select your filter. I want all general ledger codes within this calendar year. I don't want to have pledges included for the moment. I want money in the door. Let's take a look at our data. Wow, I have row by row. I have each of my general ledger codes like donors, number of unique donors, number of gifts, average and total dollars but you know what? I have 15 donors who gave 20 gifts for over $1,200 where I don't have a general ledger code. What should I do here? I should click into my 1275, look at my data here and fill in those missing general ledger codes. This is a great way to look at getting results at the same time that I'm checking my code usage. I get to see the blank values as well as my results, but you know what? I want those 20 gifts allocated appropriately. This is a choice to get the best of both of those worlds. Whereas by counter report gave me how the code was used, but I don't have financial reports. My donor type was a great example, salutation title, lots of other fields within that count report is really great for that as well. Let's come back into our presentation and let's talk about the last topic for today before we go into Q&A, talk about duplicate records. We know that there's occasions where we need to check duplicates. We know that you find duplicates on a regular basis. Unfortunately, people fill in their nicknames sometimes instead of their given names. They don't know if you people filling out an online form, don't know how our data is kept in our database. They're filling it out one way we might have another, or of course there could be a typo. We're asking the database to do some looking for us to compare the data from one record to another. You can see here that we have up to 10 fields that you can choose. You can check the boxes and choose the number of characters that you'd like to do the comparing. We want the database to do this hard work for us to present to us a list of potential duplicates, allowing us to make that review, to make those decisions to or easily clean up your data. Don't forget one thing when you're running the duplicate merge to run a backup of your database before you get into that. We know that Arlene and Donna are going to be demonstrating this report later today. We know that you've been entering your thoughts into your chat questions into the Q&A. I'd like to pass the baton over to Sean right now who's going to take over and answer your questions. Handing it over to you, Sean. Sean: All right. Thank you, Janet. Thank you. First off, I want to give a shout out to our audience. I was watching people ask questions to get answered by other DonorPerfect users, faster than I could type so thank you so much. We truly have some of the best clients. We've got some excellent questions in here. I'm just going to go from the most voted and we'll just tackle them one at a time until we are out of time here. The first one from Catherine was, can you explain why we need both donor type and organization checkbox fields? On a donor's record, the organization checkbox serves three purposes. The first one is it gives us a very broad definition, a binary, is it, or is it not an organization? That way, if you're doing certain types of mailings and you don't really care if it's a company versus a foundation, but you want to make sure you're not including individuals or households, you can just search off of this box. The second feature which Janet highlighted is it does update some of the display names. First name becomes organization prefix, contact, it was optional line when it's not checked. Then the third feature, if you use the address blocks that we provide in our merge [unintelligible 00:45:00], the organization box allows those address blocks to determine how the fields should be laid out. I'm opening up on a different screen, so give me a second I'll pull that over for everybody. For example, it knows to put the contact at the very top for an organization. Now, if you have a smart actions, you can build smart actions, that'll check off or uncheck the organization box based off of the donor type. If that is something that you've noticed or you've forgotten to do in the past, that might be a simple automation that can help save some time. All right. Then Kelly asked, I've always wondered what is better with regards to codes? Is it better to create new codes for every appeal or to keep the same appeal but when you run a report, you change the date. For example, of AA 2021, all annual appeals would just be AA and then run the report by a year. I always, and Janet, if you want to weigh on this, but I always say break it out by year, especially when you're talking about solicitation codes and campaign codes. Now in general ledgers, they tend to just be active until that ledger no longer exists, but for your solicitations, especially if you edit one, you can keep track of how many people you mailed. You can keep track of how much money you spent on a mail house or on in-house printing. You can keep track of other costs. For events, social media promotions, paying for a venue, catering staff, of course, every fundraiser typically has a goal. Even if it's just a slightly higher amount than last year's iteration, you can put in the date. By having this tied to each individual code, when you run a solicitation analysis, you can see Annual Appeal, 2021 stacked against 2020, against 2019 all in one report, you don't have to worry about changing the date ranges, and you definitely don't need to come in here and keep updating these values. Plus, if you ever want to consolidate them down, it is easier to consolidate down than it is to split things out. Nicole asked when should you remove a donor? This one, it really is going to come down. In my opinion, to the preference of the organization. At minimum, you want to keep any financial information for, I believe the IRS requires seven years and the Canadian Revenue Service, I think is a similar number. It doesn't have to be in DonorPerfect, but I figure keeping your data in one location makes it easier to access. Janet, do you want to weigh in on that? Janet: I think that you're right on target, Sean. I think that's great. It's something to think about. Sean: Yes, as long as they're still active in some capacity for 7 to 10 years, I'd say, keep them in there. If you need to reduce the count of records in your system, just make sure you're storing it in a spreadsheet or something like that. Janet: One thing I want to add to that, Sean, of course, is that we think about being able to reproduce, to replicate top donors, and things like that. If we have any donors that have a big history, quantity of donations, or top dollars, we want to make sure that the data is still available. We don't have to edit it out. I'd rather if given the choice have some inactive constituents be removed from the database, storing that information in an Excel spreadsheet so I could quickly still send them something, whether it's an email or a mailing but still have the important financials available or their volunteer history, any kind of that relationship. I still want to have that available. Sean: Absolutely. Catherine asked, DonorPerfect please consider adding some of the example selection filters in a folder as part of all of our systems. I don't know if Josh Nelson is here, but I can certainly bother him about something like that. I love being a pain whenever I can, especially if I can get away with it. In the meantime, can you send us these filter set-ups in a separate downloadable file. I don't know how we can distribute it, but that's something I can certainly ask around about and maybe we can get that information shared out within the next couple of days but like I said, I'll have to ask. Once we run the report to see who does not have a citation, is there a way to mass update that. Hopefully, everybody in this session is going to be attending the follow-up run by Arlene and Donna. They're going to be going over how to do all of that. We're showing you what to look for and they'll show you how to fix it. If you can't attend that session, it will be recorded. Which is actually Kathy's question, we'll be holding on to these I believe it's for 30 days. When receiving gift tribute notification letters using the receiving process added to the contact apparently is this a user error. Most likely, you're just going to want to go into settings parameters, and then under acknowledgments and receipts, just make sure that the create a contact record for receipt sent option is checked. For example, right now if we were to make a bunch of receipts, they wouldn't create a record in DonorPerfect. It'll still fill in the thank you date, but if we wanted to have a separate record we'd click on the check box here. That will include some information such as the general ledger, the amount of the donation, and who generated the receipt. [unintelligible 00:51:03] say it again, make sure you go to settings [inaudible 00:51:05] and then it's the acknowledgment option. Nicole asks can you tell me the difference between a solicitation and sub-solicitation? A solicitation, and Janet you can feel free to weigh in on this one as well but that's typically going to be your appeal or your event stuff. For example, that's what you have in annual appeal 2020 versus annual appeal 2021. That's when you've got the Summer Golf Tournament 2019 versus the Summer Golf Tournament 2021. A sub solicitation for an event pretty easy to conceptualize it's what can somebody spend money on. Can they buy a ticket? A ticket is as a subcode. Can they buy a sponsorship, an ad in the journal? Can they pay in for a raffle ticket? Anything that somebody can really-- Any reason somebody would have to give you money is a sub-solicitation. For appeals, it might be the specific letter that you send like the major donor letter versus the new donor letter. Some people use it to track if it was a physical mailing versus an electronic mailing, but it's basically the specific tool in your tool kit that you use to finally get somebody's attention and get that donation. Janet, did you want to build on that at all? Janet: You said it perfectly, Sean, thank you. That was great. Sean: If you deactivate codes, will they still show up in reports? Yes. Anything that you deactivate is just taken off of the drop-down list. It will show up in reports, it'll still show up on a record that has that code. When you build a filter, the only thing you'll want to keep in mind-- If we want to build filter looking for an old solicitation code, now gift pledge solicitation exactly equal to. When we look up the code, just make sure you check show and active so that way we can see for example annual appeal 2019. They are all in the system, when they're deactivated it just keeps them off that drop down, makes it a little easier to do manual data entry. Lynn asked and I saw, I'm sorry I thought I put the link to an article in there. Let me pull that link back up for you. Luanne asked if there's any chance I have a first and last name field combined to make it easier to pull mailing reports? They are system fields, they cannot be removed, we can't combine them but there is a full name calculated field that you can build. I'm going to pull in the article link for you. All you have to do is copy and paste the little piece of code that's in this article and it'll do the rest of the work for you. Put that link in there, sorry that didn't pop in earlier but you can absolutely create a full name field. I think our system has it in there right now. Janet: Sean, did you put that in the chat where everybody could see it? Sean: Oh, absolutely. Let me put that in chat as well. Janet: Just in case you're looking in the other place. Sean: There we go. Yes, you can see we have a donor full name field here. If I were to look up-- Oh, I got Mr. Callahan here. Now it has the full name and it'll even include things like a title, so you can use that in your address box if you prefer as well. Janet: [unintelligible 00:55:03]. Sean: All right. What do we get next in the proverbial mailbag here? Deborah asked, "How are you handling Facebook donations?" There generally is no other information but we send them thank you letters from DonorPerfect. An official tax receipt or thank you should be sent to Facebook since they are the middle man for the donation. If they provide you with a list of names which I can't speak to personally, you can use that to create soft credits and then send thank yous to the soft credit donors. Just make sure you don't include any tax-deductible information because as a soft credit, they should have been acknowledged via Facebook who I believe sends an email receipt within a few seconds after the donation is made. Janet, do you have anything for that? Janet: No I think that part of everybody's concern is that they don't get the details from Facebook which is-- You want the money but you're not getting all the details for the donors because Facebook is trying to keep you on Facebook. That was part of the conversation the last two days. They're doing what they need to keep you there but you don't want to lose out, so you're caught in between. Maybe if there's enough lobbying, we could-- Getting everybody together as one large group, maybe something can happen but right now we're in between. Sean: Kelly said, "Is it easier/wise to export the list then do a global update by re-uploading?" This is in relation to address cleanup. What they do not send mailbox checked, 138 is easy enough to do by hand, but if it's a bigger group it'll depend on exactly what all you're hoping to clean up. If it's just that do not mail check box, a global update can do that. If it's going to be a more general cleanup, exporting to a spreadsheet, cleaning it up, and then importing, would be the better way of doing it. Again, Arlene and Donna are going to be tackling that very topic-- Maybe not for addresses but those two tools for you in the next presentation. [silence] Sean: For a new donor the check has Mr. and Mrs. Smith, do we enter them both on one record or as two records? I would say if they have both their names on one check, that sounds like one donor record to me. I don't know if you were part of the presentation with Evan and the Josh's about some of our new features coming out, but that would also be an excellent example of a use of the household record once that feature has been rolled out for everybody. All right. Let me see if there's-- Got some pending questions. Emily asked, "What do you recommend for handling deceased donors?" Janet, I'll let you tackle this one because I would imagine they should be marked of course as a, "Do not send mail record," but how long would you recommend keeping such a record in the system? Janet: Well, part of me is-- For Emily, I'm thinking about when-- Is it a couple that now one person passed away? First I'm thinking about making sure that the record is now converted to the surviving spouse or partner in their first, and adjusting the spouse fields and whatnot, the fields appropriately as far as keeping them in the database. I'm still in favor of if push comes to shove and I'm concerned about the number of records in my database, I would still rather keep somebody that is a donor than not a donor that might have been in my database for 10 or 15 or 20 years that might have not produced anything. I don't have a relationship. Remember we've been talking about that transformational. If we don't have a relationship after a certain number of years and I can look in the database and see on the main screen when we edit them into our database, I can look at the communication see what's been going on on the contact screen. I would be in favor of keeping them as opposed to keeping the deceased owner rather than those that I don't have relationship with. If they're a low donor, low-hanging fruit on the totem pole, then that might weigh me to stay out. I'm not sure to be honest with the actual if there's a rule per se. If there's a chance of them being on a top list of any kind whatsoever, then I'd be still more inclined to keep them and of course, have them be more do not send mail with the reason of deceased to make sure that they're not included in any of my main biotype of reports unless it's a financial report which of course I want them to be in and then no mails are automatically included anyway by default. Sean: All right. We are right at the end. There was two quick questions that I want to answer. The first one from Carrie, is there a way to track pronouns or will I need to create a custom field? I believe at this time it would still need to be a custom field, which you can add in through the screen designer. Support or training can help you with that process. Then Michelle had a question that I think benefits everybody given the topic, does DonorPerfect have a concierge representative that can look at our system, help us begin the data cleanup process, or make a data cleanup plan? We actually have two tools for that. One is the DonorPerfect advisory. That'll get you a member of the training team will come through your database. We'll figure out what's going on. We talk to you about what you want to see changed and some of your pain points. We'll help devise a plan for that. Then tied to that we do have of data transfer team that will go through. With some feedback from you clean up your coding systems to help keep everything running a bit more smoothly in your system. Either way, talk to your account manager about either one of those options. That is all of the time that we have for everybody. Thank you all so much for taking time out of your days. I know we're all very busy. You have about 15 minutes before the next session, you can check out the rooms, booths, and lounges. Next up, we've got the data cleanup part two with Donna and Arlene. Then we have the recurring donors with Kelly, Sarah, and Amanda. Both are going to be starting at 3:00 PM Eastern. Again, thank you so much for joining us. Take care. Bye. Janet: Have a great day everybody. [pause 01:01:53] [01:02:24] [END OF AUDIO]

Data Cleanup Part 2: How You Get It Done

Having reliable data is critical for growthing your donor community.

Data Cleanup Part 2: How You Get It Done

Description

Having reliable data is critical for growthing your donor community. Sometimes your data becomes inconsistent, there’s data missing in key fields, or there are duplicate records. These are indicators that your database needs some maintenance. We'll show you some of the tools your database has to review the integrity of DonorPerfect, correct your data, and set your nonprofit in the right direction.

Transcript

[silence] Donna Mitchell: Okay, we are live. Good afternoon and welcome, everyone. This is one of the last sessions of our community Transform Your Fundraising conference. We're so glad that you're here. We hope that you've enjoyed so much of the wonderful content that has been presented to you in these last few days. I'd like to tell you what we're going to be doing today. This is going to be data cleanup and how you get it done. Our friends, Janet and Sean, showed you how to find the information, how to find the data that is dirty, and we're going to help you clean it up. I'm here with my esteemed colleague, Arlene Berkowitz, and I'm just going to tell you a little bit about my friend. Arlene has spent the last 20 years training clients in DonorPerfect. Now on occasion, you'll hear her training clients in Español, because she's just that awesome. Her passions are travel and photography, the former it's being a backseat during COVID. She spent the last 18 months concocting baked goods when she was not helping our clients find in and out-of-the-box solutions in DonorPerfect. That's our Arlene. Arlene Berkowitz: Thank you, Donna, for that lovely introduction. I'd like to return that with introducing everyone to my dear friend, Donna Mitchell. Hopefully, the majority, if not all of you, have had the extreme pleasure of being in a webinar that Donna has taught or possibly a personalized training. If you don't know her, you're going to get a sample of Donna's energy and personality in the next hour. Donna has been with DonorPerfect for six years as a trainer, and she's been a trainer in software for 25 years. She really finds joy in helping our clients make a difference in the world each and every day. As I mentioned, if you've been in her webinars, you know what energy she brings, and the humor that she brings, and she even brings her singing voice to her webinars. Maybe we'll get a little taste of that today. Donna believes that while learning is critical, we also have to have fun while we're doing that, so she does a good job of doing that. In her spare time when she's not a DonorPerfect trainer, Donna can be found cooking, and birdwatching, and snuggling up with her adorable puppy, Angel. With that done, we're going to kick it off. Let's learn about how you get it done as a sequel to Janet and Sean's session. Donna: All right, let's get this rocking and rolling. Our agenda for today, we're going to talk about data cleanup tools. [pause 00:03:09] Donna: Okay, all right. Arlene: [inaudible 00:03:56] Donna. Donna: Can you hear me now? Arlene: We are back, all right. Donna: Okay, you can hear me now. Hot dog, we're back. Woo-hoo. All right, so let's do it. Don't know where you stopped hearing me. We're going to talk about global update. We're going to do export and import for the win. This is really important information, we really think this is going to help you grab hold of your database and get it clean. Then finally, we'll do a recap. Let's jump in and get started. Now, this is the big deal. Before doing any of the tools that we are talking to you about today, you want to make sure to do a backup of your system. You're going to go to utilities, backup and restore, and then we're going to be able to create a new backup. We'll talk a little bit more about that once we get there, but this is really important part of it. All right, so here's the question. I know the chats going to go wild in a minute. [chuckles] How many people have duplicate records in their system? Oh my gosh, I know a bunch of you do. If you have duplicates in your system, well, the cure is going to be our functionality called merge duplicates. We'll talk about that in lovely detail in a moment. Do you have inaccurate reports or maybe gift totals? Well, code maintenance may be the culprit. We're going to show you how you can clean up your codes. Does your data need updating en masse? All right, I have a bunch of these records, and I don't want to go into 500 different records to make those changes. Well, a global update might be the answer for you. If you have inconsistent data entry, I know some people do, it's okay. Yes, you, Jonathan, I see it. Inconsistent data entry, we're going to be able to do an export of the data, clean it all up, and then import it back into DonorPerfect. That's when global update's not going to work for you. Let's jump in and take a look at each of these solutions. Now, does this happen to you? You stumble upon a duplicate when you're doing a search. You look for Bianca and you have two or three Biancas. Well, in that particular case, you can do what we call a manual merge. This allows you to go and specify the records that you encountered, and merge them on their own. Now, how about if you know there are duplicates in your system? There's a bunch, and I know it. Well, then you're going to be able to use the possible duplicate report. Same functionality, same place, but it's going to allow you to see a bunch of possible duplicates at one time. Now, what if you don't feel like doing any of that? Well, we do have an auto de-dupe feature. Now, you'll notice that we say not recommended and reason is, for my purpose, I prefer people to touch and handle their data to see what they're doing. Auto de-dupe is a convenient feature, but there's a lot going on there. We're not even going to really talk about that today. We're going to talk about merging manually and looking at the possible duplicates report. Let's do it. I'm going to go into DonorPerfect. Hello, there's DonorPerfect. All right. I want to go search for my donor, Bianca, because I need to talk to her, some thing is going on, I have to have some contact with her. I'm going to type in Bianca. It'll take just a moment to display. What? I have two Bianca Duncans. This happens to people a lot. We're going to be able to merge these together, but we're going to use the manual process, meaning we're selecting and isolating just those two records. Let's do it. The first thing I'm going to do is go into utilities. What was the first thing I told you? We need to do a backup and restore. If any of you have ever been in any of my trainings, or any of my webinars, or workshops, you know that backup and restore is super important. Why? Because this creates your safety net if you make a mistake or you said, "I don't really want to do that." You can always go back and restore your system to the way it was before. Now, we back you up every night and those backups are held for 30 days. If we have to back you up, you're going to have to cough up some duckets. What we recommend is when you're doing this major work, importing, global update, duplicate merges, you want to do your own backup. I have an incredible way for you to remember to do a backup. It's fun, and it's easy. What I want y'all to do is get up out of your seats. Get up, up, up, up, and I'm going to trust that you're getting up. You're on your runner. All right, I want you to put your hands in the air. Put your hands in the air, woo-hoo. I want you to stick your booty out, stick your booty out. Now, you're going to back it up, back it up, back it up, back up. All right, and you will never forget to backup your system again, all right? That's exactly what we're going to do. I'm going to click on the button. Hopefully, everybody's paying attention now. [laughs] We're going to click on create new backup. What this is going to do, it's going to tell you. If you have three backups you will have three backups. It's going to overwrite the oldest backup. That's what we're going to do. I'm going to click on "Ok", I'm going to back it up, back it up, back it up. [snaps fingers] All right and now my backup is complete. Now, I have a safety net. If I go on and merge these and go, "Oh man, I didn't want to do that," we can go back and click on Restore. All right, so let's go back to Utilities and we're going to go to Merge Duplicates. Now, when you get to this duplicates screen there're several pieces and parts to this screen. The first part we're going to go over next, not this moment, after this, this allows us to select matching criteria with which to merge records to determine whether they're possible duplicates. We also have the ability down here as you can see to manually combine and that's what we are going to do. We're going to manually combine two records that we discovered. Under the settings for manual combine, you'll see we have Simple Combine or Advanced Combine. Then, there's that Auto De-dupe. I'm just not even going to [inaudible 00:11:23] see that there. I'm going to select for this demo Advanced Combine. Now, advanced combine is really unique because it gives you some flexibility with which data you want to keep on the record that you're going to keep. Once I select Advanced Combine, I'm going now to the button at the bottom right that says Combine Manually. I'm going to click that and when I do, I'm going to click on Lookup Name. I'm going to grab a name. I'm going to click on Lookup Name. For this purpose, I'm going to [inaudible 00:12:04] Bianca again. Bianca Duncan. We will find her. I'm going to pick for this record the most recent record. The most recent record is the one with the higher donor ID. I'm going to select at 664. There it is. Now, I'm going to select Lookup Name and select the next one. We have to look up Bianca again. Bianca, one of my favorite names, I've always liked the name. There we go. Once I select the second record, it's going to give me this beautiful view and you will see this in just-- There we are. Column one is record one and all of the data are on record one. Column two is record two and column three is going to give me the resulting record based on the pieces of data that I select to be in that final merged record. Remember, when you do a merge, you're going to get rid of one of those records. It's going to go bye-bye for ever and ever, you'll never see it again, like a size eight for me. I'll probably never see that again. Anyway, that's another story for another time. I'm going to select the data that I want to be on this final record. Now, you'll take a look here at this salutation. It says Bianca but this one says Ms. Duncan. Depending on whether I know her, if I'm more familiar with her, I can switch that out if I want to. I'm going to go down here to the address field. You'll see on this record I have St and on this record I have Street. When we do verify addresses, it would truncate that street designation. I'm going to click the radio button next to the shortened street and look what happens. It now populates in that field. It's going to be updated with the information from this record. You'll see she's from Wheeling, West Virginia. Look, now she has a mobile phone number on this record but she doesn't have it here. I want that and I'm going to select that. You'll also notice that Bianca has two different email addresses. This is really important to know. When you merge records, all the transactional data, gifts, pledges, contacts, other info records, all that stuff goes into the newly merged record. Any addresses on the record will go to the second address screen so you will not lose any of that data, and that email address that we have here will become part of her newly merged record. We're not losing a thing. If I scroll down even further, you'll see I have my number of gifts and her lifetime total on this record. Clearly, somebody added this and didn't realize that Bianca had another record. What happens with the final record is it combines those gifts. Now, she's going to have a total of 10 gifts and a total of $3,620 as her lifetime total. We're not losing a thing. We don't lose a thing. Once you decided which pieces of data you want on that final record, you can go ahead and do an update. Now, one more thing to note is you can update the data in this fields. I want to edit something. I can't think of anything that I would want to do, but let's say I wanted to, I could certainly do that. Maybe I want to put in the name of her company in the option one. You can edit this column. I'm going to click on Combine, and bing, bang, boom, those records will be combined. Now, that record 662, it's gone. If I go back into Bianca's record, I love her name, I don't know why I keep writing Beyoncé. Well, I guess that's a wrong way to spell Beyoncé, right? We're going to look up Bianca. Now, you can see Bianca has one record and it is 443. If I go into the record, you see it took that address that we asked for. You'll notice here that Bianca has an email [inaudible 00:16:40] and she has five additional. I don't know where they came from but that's all right. You will see that biancad did become part of her record. That is how we are able to merge the record, you don't lose any data. Any address that is on the address record that you're moving over becomes an old address on this second address' screen. That is how we do a manual merge. Now, we're going to go back to Utilities and Merge Duplicates. This time, we're going to use the possible duplicates report. What does that mean? Well, that means that we're going to use these matching criteria to match records to find any records that may be possible duplicates. The four are selected by default, last name, first name, address, and zip, and the number of characters to match also are there by default. Now, you can add and remove criteria as desired. You can raise a lower number of characters as desired to find your records. What we're going to do today, we're going to remove that first name. Now, how many of you have Robert in the system and you have a Bob that you're importing or looking for? Those names are not going to show up in your duplicate reports if I have the first name selected. I'm going to remove that and up my chances of finding records that won't necessarily be found I had that selected. I'm going to go ahead down here and I'm going to click on Show Report. When I click on Show Report, it's going to open up into this screen. This is going to give you the list of the records that are possible duplicates. We say that because they may not be duplicates. For example, you might have Robert Jones and Robert Jones but they're father and son living in the same household. We want to make sure that we're checking this information. You know your donors, you know who's who. Most of the time, you'll be able to make that decision. If they are not duplicates, okay, then we will be able to click this Not Duplicates option here if they are truly not duplicates. If you mark those records as not duplicates of each other, they will never show up as duplicates of each other again. You'll save yourself some time because you're not going to see those names over and over and over. If in fact they are duplicates, you'll see Abigail and Abbie. You see, if I hadn't taken that first name off, it would not have picked up Abbie Dickens. It wouldn't have picked up anything for her. When we are going to merge the records again, we have the ability to do a simple combine or an advanced combine. Again, the simple combine, I'll just show you very quickly. I'm going to do it this way because I really love the advanced better. You'll see I can select the radio button pointing to the record I want to keep. Now, regardless of what I do here, it's still going to merge all of that gift data. Let's just go back to that screen, back to my list, and I'm going to do advanced for Abbie. Once I open that again, I'm going to see the records. Now, you're going to see something very interesting. Every time I've seen it, it will pick up the oldest record as the record you want to keep. Why? Because that's the record that we created first. Again, if something's coming in via an online form, it's new, you don't want to mess up that history. We're going to keep the oldest record, but once again, we're going to be able to go in here and add whatever data we want. I love that we have our street here and there's not a whole lot I need to move over. She has the perfect address. All that's great, but it is going to combine her gifts. This is going to merge into Abigail. I could maybe if I wanted to if I had the field, I could add Abbie as another field, but I'm going to click on Combine. Now, those records are combined. If I go into A-B-- Let me just do Dickens. We'll do Dickens, and you will see that Abbie is no longer by itself and Abigail now is. There she is, and it grabs all of her data. I'm trying to keep an eye on some of the questions to see if I can answer while I'm moving through. I think someone asked me under Utilities and Merge Duplicates, how do you get to the advanced option when you run a list. I'm going to uncheck that. I'm going to click on Show Report. For each option, and you're going to be doing these in pairs, you can choose Advanced. It's the middle column, and that will give you those columns so you can compare the data that you would like to move to the other record. Okay? All right. That is how you would do it. Now, this tells me I have a few, I have 26, so you're going to do them in pairs. Once you're done, you're good to go. All right. When should I do a merge? When should I merge duplicates? Should I do it once and never ever again? No. You have to do it regularly. You definitely want to do it before a mailing. You're sending out a mailing. You don't want to send, A, it looks very unprofessional to send multiple letters to the same person. B, it's going to cost you money and your donors are going to be like, "Hey, what are you spending my money on, mailing?" You want to do it before a mailing. You definitely want to do it before running these two reports, in particular, the Top Donor Listing and the Donors by Giving Level. These reports allow us to see our donors by their top amounts. For example, their largest gift amount, or their lifetime gift total, or their number of gifts. The Donors by Giving Level allow us to see those donors at the end of the year. Here are all the people that gave me 100,000 and up. These were people that gave me 500 and up, and so on. If you have duplicate records, you could be skewing that information. Donna had a gift for 10,000 here and 100,000 there, and I'll show up because you've got me under two different records where I should be much higher. That makes sense. That's exactly why you want to do it. If you are getting online donations, you want to do your merges weekly. Matching criteria are great, but they're not perfect. You know that people fill out their forms like Abigail did. She did Abbie. Robert will never write Rob but he always writes Bob. We have to be keeping an eye on that weekly. Those are some of the best practices for when we should be doing merging duplicates. All right, codes. Setting up and maintaining a good system of user-defined codes is critical to ensuring the consistency of your data. That's from my DonorPerfect Knowledgebase, but that is basic database 101. Everybody knows that garbage in is garbage out. Codes are really the backbone of Donorperfect. If we're not setting those codes up properly, guess what? We are not going to get our data out the way we expect to, and that's really affecting report integrity and a myriad of other things. Let's go in and take a look at some reasons why we use codes in DonorPerfect. My apologies. I was looking over here. All right. It provides consistent choices for data entry. Those dropdown coded fields, when I'm typing, creating a new record, if I typed an individual, if I had to type an individual every time I created a new record, the way I type, it would be at least 13 different iterations of individual. It allows us to select those options that are there for us. They are used in filters and reports all the time. Again, if your codes aren't good, if they're not consistent, you're not going to get the report integrity that you expect. They're referenced in other tools, such as DonorPerfect Online Forms. If you haven't used online forms, we hope that you'll give it a try, but if you have, you know that when you're creating those forms, you have the ability to set the item codes, those gift codes so that when those transactions download into DonorPerfect, they're going to update the gift record with the data that you actually wanted to be in there. It saves you time from entering data. You don't have to worry about it, but it is referenced there and you get to create and select the choices for each of your coded fields. Let's talk about some best practices for codes. This is really important, and I stress this often whenever I'm in webinars and training, but you want your codes to have succinct abbreviations. Now, I know most of you when you create your codes, you know that on the fly, and I'll show you that in a moment. When you create those codes on the fly, the code responds to the description, it's the same. I'm asking you to take a couple of extra seconds to make those codes a little more succinct. Instead of it saying 2021 annual appeal, what about AA 2021? That's going to make your life better. Trust me. You want your codes to be clear and intuitive. People should be able to look at them and understand what they are even without the description. Be consistent. I think Janet spoke to this beautifully in the previous session. Your solicitation codes identify the event or the appeal. It also allows DonorPerfect to calculate your return on investment. Why not put those years on those codes? That's going to make it easier to filter that data out, it's going to be easier for DonorPerfect to calculate that return on investment, and you don't have to do anything but run a report. This is really going to make your data come alive and make it much easier for you to get the data out and report the way you want. All right. What we're going to talk about, and I'm sure some of you have these things happen. How to fix a broken description or a code? You're in the system, you're like, "Ah, I don't really want to do it. I understand that this isn't done right. How do I fix it?" Well, you have the ability to change the description in Code Maintenance. Let's say we have, again, 2021. Well, let's say I call it 2021 annual appeal and I can change that description right there in Code Maintenance, it'll update all the records that it is currently touching and it will change that description for that code. I can also change the code in Code Maintenance to a new code. Yes, we can absolutely do that. Now, you want to be very, very careful about doing that and we're going to show you some steps you should take to make sure that you're being careful there. You can also go to Settings and Global Update to change data using the old code to an existing code. We're going to show you that in the next section on Global Updates, but let's go in and show you how to simply change a description. Then, we're going to run a report to change a code. I'm going to jump right back into DonorPerfect. I'm going to go to Settings. Well, before I go there, let me just show you on the donor record. This is what I'm talking about and I think a lot of you will be very familiar with what you're about to see. For example, if I go into-- and this is not the best example, but I'm going to use it. Here, we're going to use our description. Let's call this Government Agency. You see how my description is just copying whatever we see here. I'm going to ask you to do something like that. It's an extra second and now your code is truly a code and your description is truly a description. Now that we've done that, let's go in and we're going to show you how to change a code. Now we can do it here, but I'm going to go into Settings in the top right corner and Code Maintenance. Code Maintenance allows you to access all of the codes in your system. What we're going to do, I'm going to click the dropdown and I'm going to find my code. Let me see. I'm good at solicitation. I'm going to click on Go. One of the things that is really-- I don't know if you guys have noticed it, it snuck in there but now it gives you the name of the coded field and the screen that it's on. Whoop, whoop. I love that. It's my favorite. For example, if I were to go into one of these codes and I'm going to actually change this Annual Appeal code in a moment, but we can very easily just change the code on the fly. For example, if I said I didn't really want that to say virtual, I can go into the code and I can just take the description out. Now, I'm going to put it back later but I can just change that. What's going to happen is, it's going to update all the records that it's touching. It's easy-peasy. Now, I'm going to go back in there. This is the one. I'm going to put it back. I'm going to put in Virtual. Virtual, I can spell, see? That's why you don't want to type in those codes, honey. Now, what if I decided to change the code? I'm just going to put an _VIR. Guess what? When I save this now, it's going to say, "Hey, there are existing codes using this original code, FALLGALA2020." If you continue, they're going to update the rest of those records. This is how I can change the code on those records, just like that. I click on Continue. Just like that, the code is changed. There you will see, now it says that. Let's say that I have-- You saw that End of Year Appeal, right? I'm going to show you what I mean. We have this code here End of Year Appeal, but it doesn't have a year on it. Not really sure, it shouldn't really be sitting there. If I have gifts that are from one year or another, I'm going to be thrown off on my reports. The best practice would be to go run a report to find out which records have this code. Then, we can go in and do a global update. Now, there's a couple of ways you can do it if I go to Reports and the Report Center. I know Janet spoke about the counter report, that is a listing report. The counter report is a wonderful report to use when you're cleaning up data. If I go to this counter report, what it does is it counts the number of times or which records are using that particular code. I could go in here and I can see which records are using that EOY code. I'm going to select my screen, which is Gift Pledge. I'll leave it right there. We're going to keep it on solicitation. I want to see, for example, I can see how many times I'm just going to run this. I'm just going to run the report so you can see it. I'm not going to do anything special here. What it does is it counts the number of times that a code is being used on these records. You'll see now that my EOY code is on 15 Records. Now, at this moment, I don't know which records they are, so I'm going to do a search. I'm going to click on that 15. It's going to drill down to that list, and it's going to show me the records that have that code. Look, they're all 2017 gifts. That's really cool. That's easy. Now I can update this and change this via a global update. I think I went too far. I'm sorry. [laughs] I did all that, I didn't talk about global update. Oh my gosh, I got excited. All right. We're going to come right back to this [chuckles]. We showed you how to create a description, change it, and how to change a code in Code Maintenance to a new code. Now, we're going to go and talk about Global Update to the rescue. [sings] I know a lot of people are afraid global may update and you should be intimidated. The reason I say that is because it's a major big deal. I always tell my clients, if you're going to do a global update, hop on the horn, call support and say, "Hey, this is what I'm trying to do." They'll be like, "Yes, you're all over it, you got it, you can do it," or, "Whoop, no, you don't want to do that. Let us walk you through it." Global Update to the rescue. When you want to change the contents of one field and all the records to a value that you specify all at once. This allows you to globally update those records with the use of a filter to some other thing. Now, some tips for Global Update. Global Update is, again, if you know what you're doing, fantastic. Just be thinking about what you need and here are some tips that we have for you. First, know which records need to be updated. We're going to do that with a report like we just did. I need to know which records I'm updating. I want to run a report to see those records. Now, I know there's a common denominator. You want to know the data type of the field that you're updating. Is it a dropdown coded field? Is it a text field? Is it a date field? You need to be aware of the data type of the field. Then, you want to do and check your results after the update, either by spot-checking records or running a report on those records to see how they were updated. It's really, really not hard to do. When you think about it and use the steps, you're going to be awesome. Trust me, trust me, trust me, trust me. Let's take a look and to give you some ideas of different ways that we can use Global Update. The first way is I'm going to get my little spotty on. Hey. See, if we have a song, we'd go [sings]. Remember those back in the day, the cartoons? Some examples of reasons you could do a global update. We just changed all of our gifts. We're going to change all of our gifts from EOY to EOY2017. We just needed to do that by changing the code, and everything would be copacetic. We're going to do that in just a moment. One of the things, I'm going to change the solicitation code on gifts in this date range, January 1st, 2018 to January 31st, 2018 from Annual Appeal 2018 to End of Year Appeal 2017. What? Why are we doing that? Because those gifts that came in in January were all the gifts that were sitting under Susan's desk that we should have had for their end-of-year appeal. We're going to change those. Also, do you ever have records? I know someone asked us in the previous session. Do you ever have records where the salutation is blank? If the salutation is blank on your records and you do a mail merge letter, your letter will read, "Dear blank comma." I will tell you, if I get a letter that says, "Dear blank comma," I'm going to look at that organization a little funny, just saying. We're going to show you how to fill the salutation field for individual records where the salutation field is empty. We're going to populate it with the data that are in the first name field. What? Yes, we can do that. Another thing you can do, let's say for example, you have flagged donors or constituent records who are prospects. We have all these records in here that are prospects and we get a gift from some of these people. We can actually use Global Update to remove the Flag of Prospect from constituents with a gift total of $1 or more. That means they've given a gift, that means they're no longer a prospect. We can update or remove those flags en masse. Finally, we can delete prospects with no gifts that have not been updated in the last three years. These are some of the ways that you can actually use Global Update. Let's do this. I'm going to change that EOY to EOY17 and I'll tell you why. Then, we're going to change the solicitation code on those 2018 gifts in January to EOY2017. Then, we're going to do global update to fill in the salutation field for individuals where the salutation is empty. We're going to fill it in with the first name field. Let's move back over. Here are my 2017 end-of-year gifts so I know, all of these are okay, I can actually just change the code. Instead of going into code maintenance, going to show you another way. If I click on the gift amount for Roger Sandstone, how many people know Roger? Everybody knows [inaudible 00:40:16]. If I ever meet somebody named Roger Sandstone, though, I don't know what I'm going to do, I'll probably just burst into laughter. All right, here's my solicitation code, and as we know, we can create update codes right on the data entry screen. I'm going to click on the plus sign, but this time, I'm going to select manage codes. Okay, there's my end-of-year appeal, and I'm going to edit this code right here. Now, I would only do this, if all of those records were marked that way. We clearly couldn't do that if they were different needs. I'm going to click on the pencil to edit, and we're going to call this 2017, and we're going to call this 2017. We're going to save- the code already exists. What do you mean the code already exists? That's not true. Hold on one second. Bear with me love muffins. Want to go back into code maintenance? I may have erred. Solicitation. Yes, that shouldn't- this should be EOY17, and this is 2017. All right, let's try that save. There we are code is going to update existing records. Okay, and now we go back to reports. Remember, I told you, we can double-check and, update. I'm just going to refresh this counter-report, and you'll see that EOY is going to go [unintelligible 00:42:10] and now we're going to run that again. Now you see those 15 gifts are now EOY17. [unintelligible 00:42:24]. All right, now, we're going to do that global update. Once again, I told you, I recommend that running reports. You can see the records that you are dealing with. I'm going to use a different report this time, and it's a financial report called gifts by date. This report allows me to see some gift information on gifts in a specific date range. I'm going to look for those gifts. January 1st, 2018 to January 31st, 2018, or 1/31/2018. I want to clear the values, and I want to run. These gifts were accidentally entered as 2018 annual appeal. They're really not, they're my end-of-your-appeal gifts. I'm going to be able to globally update these records, and there are 18 of them. What we're going to do, we're going to go back to utilities, and for you, you are going to absolutely do a backup. Okay, I'm not going to do it now. We just did one but you're going to do a backup. We're going to go into global update and yes, oh, I meant no, I should not have cut it. Well, actually, it'll work fine because we'll be able to see my results? Yes, Elizabeth. I know it's a test system, and we've all been [inaudible 00:44:10] it, and we try to clean it up as best as we possibly could. I'm glad you said that. I wanted to mention that. You would definitely not have all of those. Okay. All right, when we go to global update, what we need to do is just follow the steps. The action is to update. If we click on update, this is going to update fields, because we see fields. If I click one, action delete, I don't see any fields. What am I deleting? Records. Again, if you are not sure what you're doing, or you just want somebody to walk you through and call support, and tell them what you're trying to do, okay? All right, we're going to click one update, and we need to know which screen and which field we're talking about. We want to find the records on the gift screen. The field we want to update is a solicitation. Now, I don't know if you all know this, but you can click into a field list in most places, and just type in a couple of letters, and there we are with solicitation code. We want to update the field solicitation, and we want to update it to a specific value. If it's a coded field, like solicitation, we can simply look up the code, and here are my list of codes. I want to change all of those to EOY17. That I did. Oh, that's why it said that. Okay, we're going to use this. Thank you, Elizabeth. I'm going to update the solicitation code to EOY17, and I have to do a filter. Which records do I want? Even if you're doing all records, you have to set a filter, it's very, very safe. I'm going to click on set selection filter, and which records do I want, I want those gifts that were dated in that date range. I'm going to add a new filter, and let me see if anybody's smart knows what other set of criteria I need. I'm going go to the gift pledge screen. I know I need that date of gift. We know that, and it's between 1/01/2018 and 1/31/2018. Add more criteria, and the next field is I don't want to do all the gifts in 2018. That would be bad. I only want to do those with a solicitation code that is exactly equal to, annual appeal 2018. If we don't see it here, that means it is inactive. I can click on show inactive codes, and there's my annual appeal '18. I hope you all know that when you inactivate a code, you can still use it in filters and reports. I'm going to click on continue. There are my two sets of criteria, and we're going to combine it with an and. Now you don't have to save this filter. Why? Because this filter will be null and void after this. I'm not going to save it, I don't want to click on done, and now we're going to do it. I recommend that you do because then you can see if the criteria are, and let's do that. Well, you get it. I'm not going to go back and do that. We're going to click on continue, and it warned you better create a backup, and we've gone Okay, and bada boom, bada bang, you are backed up. Let's check our work. I'm going to go back to the report center, and then we're going to do our gifts by date once more. The sun is beaming in, it's come up, yes, the sunshine. I love that song. All right, here we are, I'm going to get rid of my filter. Okay, and there are my gifts, and I'm going to run this, and you will see that they're all now updated to end-of-year 2017. Bada bing, bada boom, okay, nice. You can tell I just watched the Many Saints in Newark. That is how you're able to do a global update. Now we're going to do one and I see we are running really short on time, but this one is very important. I'm just going to run these reports, go back to reports. I'm going to find all the records with a salutation. We're just going to do account. I'm going to go here. Actually, we can do regular reports, we can see one name and go check it. I'm going to create a filter. Thank you, Martha. All right, our filter is going to be- I modify all the individual donors whose salutation field is null or blank. I think I've already done it. I'm going to just- here it is. Individual donors, donor type individual, and salutation is no. Let's go ahead and select that filter. Now we're going to run our report. All these folks that are about to display, they're going to get a letter that says, "Dear blank, comma." We have nine pages. Oh my word. We have nine pages. That's a lot of that. All right. [laughs] We have 254. We're going to change that. I'm going to go into utilities. Sorry about that. Utilities and global update. No, I don't want to save that. Sutherland. I'll just try to remember a name. We're going to update again main bio. In the field, we're going to type in salutation because that's the field that we want to type in, that we want to update. When you're doing a global update, to fill in value with the field name, you're going to click this checkbox that says value contains field names. In the value to update, you're going to type in the DonorPerfect field name. The DonorPerfect field name for first name is first_name. Which records do I want to do it for? Again, we have to set our filter. We're going to select filter, this one, and continue, and okay. Now, that's done. If I go back to record 544, I will see now that Mr. Sutherland's record is now updated with the salutation, with the first name. Cool. Moving on, what happens if a global update is not the answer, your data is inconsistent. It's not as straightforward as putting in the first name or updating the salutation with that. We're going to be able to export the data from DonorPerfect, scrub, scrub, scrub it in Excel, and then import it right back into DonorPerfect. Let's show you how to do that. When the global update is not the right answer, you want to export the data out of DonorPerfect. You want to be sure to include the field that needs to be updated or filled in. If you have blank donor types or blank salutations, you want to make sure those fields are in your export document. You're going to include any other fields that might be helpful. If it's names, if you know it's an individual donor and not an organization, or maybe it's a husband and wife you know it should be Mr. & Mrs. These are things that would be helpful. You also want to include the table ID number. For example, if you're updating gift records, you want to use that gift ID. Every record, every transaction gets an ID in DonorPerfect. That gift ID is going to be the exact record that we're updating, we need that or the contact ID or something, or the donor ID. You're going to make your changes in Excel, and then we're going to import them back into DonorPerfect. Here's the example that we're going to use, and I sure hope-- Oh my. There we go. I'm swinging DonorPerfect over. Hold on. Where is DonorPerfect? There it is. I'm going to go run a report, and I'm going to find these records that have these specific issues. I'm going to go to export to file. I'm going to find these specific records. I'm going to get rid of our filter. This is going to be a main biofilter. What, again, you want to do is make sure that when you're creating your export template, that it has the fields that you want. What I'm going to do is I'm going to find records that have all of this inconsistent data. What I'm going to do is I'm going to apply my filter, and I'm going to show you these records before we even export them out of the system. Here is the filter that I'm using. If we had more time I would show you how to create it, but we are running on time, so I'm going to click on select. Basically, what this filter is saying is I need to find all the donors whose donor type is blank, whose salutation is blank. Actually, I'm going go in here so you can actually see the criteria. Whose salutation is blank or no. The donor type is blank or no. The first name or the last name contains an ampersand or an and. That's a multiple equals. What this is going to do is it's going to give me a list of those records. I'm going to click on preview. I actually wanted to pick one. That was too many people. There's my 41 people. Oh, I didn't want all those people, but that's okay. I've got to make sure I have the right workgroup. Oh, my gosh, I totally forgot which one I'm supposed to do. I was supposed to use certain records, but that's okay, we're going to use just some. We're going to show you this. I'm going to preview. My export template contains the fields that I need. I have my donor ID, perfect. You'll see my salutation fields there. You'll also notice if I scroll over, do I have my donor type one here? Yes, there is my donor type. I'm going to pull these records. I know what it was, and the flag. That's what it were. Bear with me one second, folks. Oh, I know, we're getting close, we're getting close. We're getting close. I'm going to go into donor names, addresses, and phone numbers, and it's the flag. That's what it is. Where's my flag field. Oh, my gosh. I don't know where my flag field is. I can't believe it's not on here. I did this, I practiced this 100 times. Let me go get the flag field. Bear with me, folks, I apologize. This wasn't there. That's what happens when a lot of folks are playing, I probably got rid of it, and didn't realize it. Flag is update. That should do it. That should give me my list. Of course, it doesn't, but this is what we're going to do. I'm going to export that list anyway. I'm going to export using a template when I export the data out, and I'm going to show you how to fix these records. I'm going to open up my file. What I'm going to do, just for our purposes today, is I'm going to-- Bear with me one second. Some of these, they should have blank donor types. See, these folks have a blank donor type, Michelle Harvey. You'll notice, if I go here, and I know you can't see it, I apologize. I totally forgot. Let me just get rid of this. I'm going to delete this for you. My humble apologies. I totally lost blank what I was supposed to be doing. That's what I want right there, delete. See Michelle Berley. You'll notice, in this last name field, if I open this up, that the last name field reads Berley and John Harvey. That shouldn't be in the last name field. This should actually be in the optional line. Remember, the optional line contains the name of someone in the household with a different last name. I'm going to go ahead and put that in. I think I forgot the J. That's all right. Not only that, we want that to just be Berley. We also see the salutation says Michelle, we want this to say "And John." We don't want to send it to both of them and have it come in that way. I know there's a Doyle in here, so I'm going to get rid of a bunch of stuff here. I'm just going to show you how to fix a couple more of these. Bear with-- Here's my Doyle. There they are. Delete. I'm going to grab these two, I'm just going to grab these. I'm going to get rid of the rest of this because we're going to be here forever. Delete. You'll see here that the salutation is there. Is there a donor type there? Neither one of them have a donor type. I'm going to get rid of that description. I'm just going to do the donor type for those two we know the individual. We're going to be able to import this data back in. You'll also notice that in the first name I have Jamie A-N-D Evan, and then Mr. & Mrs. I prefer And in this particular case, so I'm going to change the title to And and the salutation to And, because you'll notice that that's being used inconsistently. Now we can go in and update this. This is Mr. & Mrs. Doyle, everything looks beautiful, and we have the donor types in there. Superb. Let's get rid of the description, and I'm going to make sure I got everything in here, I'm going to delete that, and I'm going to delete these. I'm just deleting these so we can get this stuff in, and I'm going to import these two records now. We're going to make this import update. This is what you would do if you had a bunch of salutations that were different, that were blank, but you were going to make some people their first name and some people not. You just have to go in and do that. Let's go back into DonorPerfect. Assuming that we've done a backup, we're going to go into import. I recommend not saving your filters as you move out of reports. We're going to choose our file. I know we're going over, I'm trying to be respectful of your time. I'm going to select our file, which needs to be a CSV file, separated value. We're going to update existing records and no, I'm sorry, we're going to update existing records for a specific table. I'm sorry. No, I'm not. It's update existing and then insert the rest as new. I'm going to do main records only because I'm not typing anything at all. I'm using that donor ID so it's going to update those exact records. We're going to click on next step. All of my fields match. I get a sample of my import information. I can go to the next step. The validation process, my records are valid and ready to go. Now I can click on import records, and we are updated. If you want a copy of your information, be sure to export it before you move from this page. Let's go look up Berley, B-E-R-L-E-Y. Let's see what we did to her record. It looks like we have two, but we're going to go into this one, and it did exactly what we wanted it to do. It put John in the optional line, it gave Michelle and John in the salutation, and it updated the donor type. Now again, I know we've gone over time, but I want to just be mindful. I know that you're all here. We're going to talk about your different situations. If your donor type or salutation is blank, make sure you're using the basic mailing template and fill export template to make sure you have the fields that you need to update. As well as any that need to help you understand what information you're going to be updating. If you have incomplete data on your gift screen, you're going to use that receding export template. Those should be in your system. Again, you can use these following tools often to keep your database healthy, merge duplicates. Make sure your codes are up-to-date and code maintenance, global updates, and export and import. We have a data cleanup workflow tip sheet available for you. Make sure you scroll down to the bottom of the screen to get that document, put it in your briefcase, or download it. Now I know we are way past time, and I hope that if you have any questions, they have been answered, but if not, do we want to open the floor or are we saying goodbye? Arlene: I'm good. I don't know how we're doing with time, everybody. Donna: Yes, we're a little over time, but I don't know if people are wanting to do some questions before we go to the final close. Arlene: All right. Don't know if we're going to get cut off so let's just stay on as long as the party is. Donna: As long as we can. Arlene: Thanks so much, John, for an outstanding job. One of the questions that was asked when we did the exercise to change, for instance, EOY to EOY17, and that flowed beautifully. One of the things that you want to look out for is if you have saved filters, or you have calculated fields that use those saved filters, or smart actions, for instance, you will have to update those filters for the new code. One way to do it is by going to settings and filters. There's the ability to search either words that are in your filter name, or the field names, or even the codes that are in your filters. Be aware of doing that if you're pretty sure that that code would not be in a filter, you're good, but just be aware that you would need to do that separately. I wanted to stress that. Thank you, everybody, for your kind words. They also [unintelligible 01:06:08] Donna, you back it up, back it up. It's all wonderful GIF image here. We're going to share with you that a new GIF image. Thank you. Donna: Jill asked, Yes, your documents are saved in the briefcase. They'll be available for the next 30 days. So you can come back in onto your login and download any of your documents that you've collected. Thank you, Jill. Great question. Arlene: Katherine is asking because in the last session, in terms of the cleanup filters to see what we can do. We also have some other people who might be able to do that. I wonder if Josh has a lot on his plate with all that is new and exciting down the road with DonorPerfect. I'm going to see if we can get some people to assist him with doing that. That would definitely be very valuable. Thank you so much, Katherine. Donna: Thank you all so much. You're so kind. It was such a pleasure just working with you Arlene: And please don't hesitate to reach out to support. If you're doing these things like the global update, or the export, and then the input, and it's the first time you're doing it. Don't hesitate to reach out, to support for assistance. We also invite you to come to webinars that go over these tools. We have them available very, very frequently. Donna: Absolutely. Arlene: Any lingering questions or anything that was not answered our apologies. Anything not answered that you want to submit again, if you are still on? Donna: Yes, the recordings are there again. They're also there for the 30 days. You can come back using your ID to log in, and those recordings will be there for you. After that, you'll be able to find them in the knowledge base somewhere. You'll get notification of that, but 30 days you have to get in here and redo some things. Arlene: Exactly. Donna: I have to say, I've seen a lot of people these last three days, and I've seen a lot of the same people at the sessions. I can't tell you what your support means. It's really interesting. You think when you don't see people that it doesn't make a difference, but just reading your responses and watching you help one another. Answering each other's questions and giving tips, and just supporting us is really appreciated. Thank you all so much. Arlene: Hi [crosstalk]. Donna: How do you retrieve your documents from the briefcase? Good question. Hopefully, our host is able to put that on there and let us know how you're able to do that. I'm pretty sure on your profile, you would probably find an icon or something that would allow you to get there. I don't know for sure, but that sounds like a plan to me. Thank you all for what you do each and every day to make this world a better place. I tell you it's a great job to have that we have to help you all do the amazing things that you do every day. Thank you. Arlene: When you go to this site it'll have your profile, whatever questions you didn't answer on your profile from that, the menu will be to go to your briefcase. That's how you'll be able to find any of those files that you put in the briefcase. Thank you. Donna: Thank you all so much. Yes, Laurie says, you can download that from your profile. I'm pretty sure it's going to be relatively easy to find and see. Just go to your profile I'm sure you'll see your briefcase there. I downloaded a bunch of docs too, so I have to get in there too. Great. Arlene: Hopefully, everybody's ready to do some cleaning up of your database right? Donna: Yes. We'll come on up. Arlene: [unintelligible 01:10:10] excellent. Donna: Right? Go clean up our database. All right. Well, it looks like-- I don't see any more questions coming through. Arlene: I think that would be a wrap. Donna: That is going to be a wrap. All right, beautiful people. Bye. Arlene: [unintelligible 01:10:34] you have a lovely afternoon and evening, everybody. [silence] [01:11:11] [END OF AUDIO]

“Actionable ideas, new ideas, I love all of it. I will be pulling quotes from the recorded session later to share with my board.”

Kerry, Austin Public Library

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